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    theresalee

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Capitalism Review

    Post  theresalee on Thu Oct 08, 2009 1:03 am

    Capitalism: Not Your Typical Love Story
    Love Conquers All…Except Capitalism

    In theatres this month: Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Whip It, (or insert other October movies that haven’t yet come out but will be), and Capitalism: A Love Story. Wait, what?! Michael Moore and the camera make hot steamy love to…American business?
    In his newest documentary, Michael Moore, director of Sicko and Fahrenheit 9/11, reviews the romantic relationship of capitalism in the United States. But it’s more a love-hate situation than you think. In fact, Moore concentrates on how the rich loves to benefit from those less fortunate in the current state of the economy.
    The opening scenes, a compilation of bank robberies, are symbolic of Moore’s message to America: that capitalism is robbing the people of their earnings. Capitalism, defined by many different people in this film, is “a system of taking and giving…mostly taking” and “tak[ing] advantage of other’s misfortune.” Focusing on the flaws of the economic system, Moore illustrates examples of how free enterprise is ruining lives of the working class. Kids sent to a privately owned juvenile hall without a proper chance for explanation while the facility and judge make money off the corporal exchange. Companies like Walmart who make large sums of money as the beneficiary once their clients and/or employees die. Pilots who live on food stamps. Workers getting laid off even though their company have procured taxpayers money. Moore successfully reveals to his audience how severely faulty the American economy is at this point. Yet his anger seems to be misguided. He claims that “capitalism is an evil, and you can’t regulate evil,” but politics play a much larger role in how business is run in this country. Instead of focusing on restructuring the economic system, perhaps it is more reasonable to direct emotions and opinions of inequality at the government.
    Though a bit lengthy at two hours, this film brings a new perspective to the so-called free pursuit of happiness in capitalism. Yet his focus may be slightly off center, Moore still uncovers the hidden injustice present in today’s economy.

    (I still have quite some stuff I need to add.)

    theresalee

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Capitalism Review

    Post  theresalee on Thu Oct 08, 2009 10:42 am

    In theatres this month: Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Whip It, (or insert other October movies that haven’t yet come out but will be), and Capitalism: A Love Story. Wait, what?! Michael Moore and the camera make hot steamy love to…American business?
    In his newest documentary, Michael Moore, director of Sicko and Fahrenheit 9/11, reviews the romantic relationship of capitalism in the United States. But it’s more a love-hate situation than you think. In fact, Moore concentrates on how the rich loves to benefit from those less fortunate in the current state of the economy.
    The opening scenes, a compilation of bank robberies, are symbolic of Moore’s message to America: that capitalism is robbing the people of their earnings. Capitalism, defined by many different people in this film, is “a system of taking and giving…mostly taking” and “tak[ing] advantage of other’s misfortune.” Focusing on the flaws of the economic system, Moore collects examples of how free enterprise is ruining lives of the working class. Kids sent to a privately owned juvenile hall without a proper chance for explanation while the facility and judge make money off the corporal exchange. Companies like Walmart who make large sums of money as the beneficiary once their clients and/or employees die. Pilots who live on food stamps. Workers getting laid off even though their company have procured taxpayers money. Moore successfully reveals to his audience how severely faulty the American economy is at this point. Yet his anger seems to be misguided. Michael argues that the current system is closer to a plutonomy, where the wealthy few control the growth (or in today’s case, the decline) of the economic and social well being. He claims that “capitalism is an evil, and you can’t regulate evil,” but politics play a much larger role in how business is run in this country. Instead of focusing on restructuring the economic system, perhaps it is more reasonable to direct emotions and opinions of inequality at the government. Without offering a probable solution to the flawed economics of society, Moore fails to fully educate his audience, only identifying the problem. His idea of bringing about change involves driving armored vehicles to companies like AIG, demanding they return government supplements, threatening to make citizen’s arrests, and wrapping the building with crime scene tape.
    A bit lengthy at two hours, this film brings a new perspective to the so-called free pursuit of happiness in capitalism. Though his focus may be slightly off center, Moore still uncovers the hidden injustice present in today’s economy.

    hanarudolph

    Posts : 152
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Capitalism Review

    Post  hanarudolph on Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:21 am

    In theatres this month: Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Whip It, (or insert other October movies that haven’t yet come out but will be), and Capitalism: A Love Story. Wait, what?! Michael Moore and the camera make hot steamy love to…American business?
    In his newest documentary, Michael Moore, director of Sicko and Fahrenheit 9/11, reviews the romantic relationship of capitalism [and what? you can't have a relationship without the "target" of that romantic relationship] in the United States. But it’s more a love-hate situation than you think. [combine sentences "But it's more like a love-hate situation: in fact, ..."] In fact, Moore concentrates on how the rich loves [change to "love"] to benefit from those less fortunate in the current state of the economy. [this is a really harsh and inaccurate generalization-- there are many rich philanthropists, so it's unfair to say the rich love to feed off the poor.]
    The opening scenes, a compilation of bank robberies, are symbolic of [the bank robberies are symbolic of capitalism robbing America, which is Moore's message. the robberies are not symbolic of Moore's message. you know what I mean?] Moore’s message to America: that ["that" should only be used with a comma, not a colon] capitalism is robbing the people of their earnings. Capitalism, as defined by many different people in this film, is “a system of taking and giving…mostly taking”-- and [delete "and"] “tak[ing] advantage of other’s misfortune.” Focusing on the flaws of the economic system, Moore collects [reword] examples of how [delete "how"] free enterprise is [delete "is"] ruining the lives of the working class. Kids sent to a privately owned juvenile hall without a proper chance for explanation [change "for explanation" to "to explain"] while the facility and judge make money off of the corporal exchange. Companies like Walmart who make large sums of money as the beneficiary once their clients and/or employees die. Pilots who live on food stamps. Workers getting laid off even though their company have procured taxpayers money. [These should be full sentences-- you're talking about examples that Moore comes up with, not examples in general, so while fragments are stylistically nice, these should be full sentences.] Moore successfully reveals to his audience how severely faulty the American economy is at this point ["at this point" is unnecessary. even if we recover, if we keep the same system it will still be faulty right?]. Yet his anger seems to be misguided. [change period to colon] Michael [change to "Moore"] argues that the current system is closer [than what? closer is a comparative word] to a plutonomy, where the wealthy few control the growth (or in today’s case, the decline) of the economic and social well being. He claims that “capitalism is an evil, and you can’t regulate evil,” but politics play a much larger role [than what? again, a comparative word] in how business is run in this country. Instead of focusing on restructuring the economic system, perhaps it is more reasonable to direct emotions and opinions of inequality [really awkward] at the government. Without offering a probable solution to the flawed economics of society, Moore fails to fully educate his audience, only identifying the problem [finding the problem is the first step: many people don't even know why the economy is bad, so I don't think you should belittle his achievement is successfully educating his audience about the problem? if someone had a good solution, there'd be no need for this movie]. His idea of bringing about change involves driving armored vehicles to companies like AIG, demanding they return government supplements, threatening to make citizen’s arrests, and wrapping the building with crime scene tape [switch the last two sentences.].
    Though A bit lengthy at two hours, this film brings a new perspective to the so-called "free" pursuit of happiness in capitalism. Though [reword to "while"] his focus [his focus, to reveal the problems in capitalism, is right, isn't it? it's his stratagem for recovery that's off.....? if not, maybe your article isn't clear enough; i haven't watched the movie] may be slightly off center, Moore still uncovers the hidden injustice present in today’s economy.

    hanarudolph

    Posts : 152
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Capitalism Review

    Post  hanarudolph on Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:22 am

    In theatres this month: Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Whip It, (or insert other October movies that haven’t yet come out but will be), and Capitalism: A Love Story. Wait, what?! Michael Moore and the camera make hot steamy love to…American business?
    In his newest documentary, Michael Moore, director of Sicko and Fahrenheit 9/11, reviews the romantic relationship of capitalism [and what? you can't have a relationship without the "target" of that romantic relationship] in the United States. But it’s more a love-hate situation than you think. [combine sentences "But it's more like a love-hate situation: in fact, ..."] In fact, Moore concentrates on how the rich loves [change to "love"] to benefit from those less fortunate in the current state of the economy. [this is a really harsh and inaccurate generalization-- there are many rich philanthropists, so it's unfair to say the rich love to feed off the poor.]
    The opening scenes, a compilation of bank robberies, are symbolic of [the bank robberies are symbolic of capitalism robbing America, which is Moore's message. the robberies are not symbolic of Moore's message. you know what I mean?] Moore’s message to America: that ["that" should only be used with a comma, not a colon] capitalism is robbing the people of their earnings. Capitalism, as defined by many different people in this film, is “a system of taking and giving…mostly taking”-- and [delete "and"] “tak[ing] advantage of other’s misfortune.” Focusing on the flaws of the economic system, Moore collects [reword] examples of how [delete "how"] free enterprise is [delete "is"] ruining the lives of the working class. Kids sent to a privately owned juvenile hall without a proper chance for explanation [change "for explanation" to "to explain"] while the facility and judge make money off of the corporal exchange. Companies like Walmart who make large sums of money as the beneficiary once their clients and/or employees die. Pilots who live on food stamps. Workers getting laid off even though their company have procured taxpayers money. [These should be full sentences-- you're talking about examples that Moore comes up with, not examples in general, so while fragments are stylistically nice, these should be full sentences.] Moore successfully reveals to his audience how severely faulty the American economy is at this point ["at this point" is unnecessary. even if we recover, if we keep the same system it will still be faulty right?]. Yet his anger seems to be misguided. [change period to colon] Michael [change to "Moore"] argues that the current system is closer [than what? closer is a comparative word] to a plutonomy, where the wealthy few control the growth (or in today’s case, the decline) of the economic and social well being. He claims that “capitalism is an evil, and you can’t regulate evil,” but politics play a much larger role [than what? again, a comparative word] in how business is run in this country. Instead of focusing on restructuring the economic system, perhaps it is more reasonable to direct emotions and opinions of inequality [really awkward] at the government. Without offering a probable solution to the flawed economics of society, Moore fails to fully educate his audience, only identifying the problem [finding the problem is the first step: many people don't even know why the economy is bad, so I don't think you should belittle his achievement is successfully educating his audience about the problem? if someone had a good solution, there'd be no need for this movie]. His idea of bringing about change involves driving armored vehicles to companies like AIG, demanding they return government supplements, threatening to make citizen’s arrests, and wrapping the building with crime scene tape [switch the last two sentences.].
    Though A bit lengthy at two hours, this film brings a new perspective to the so-called "free" pursuit of happiness in capitalism. Though [reword to "while"] his focus [his focus, to reveal the problems in capitalism, is right, isn't it? it's his stratagem for recovery that's off.....? if not, maybe your article isn't clear enough; i haven't watched the movie] may be slightly off center, Moore still uncovers the hidden injustice present in today’s economy.

    hanarudolph

    Posts : 152
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Capitalism Review

    Post  hanarudolph on Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:23 am

    sorry, I don't know why there's two. they're the same edit. Smile

    theresalee

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Capitalism Review

    Post  theresalee on Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:56 am

    In theaters this month: Where the Wild Things Are, Zombieland, Astroboy, and Capitalism: A Love Story. Wait, what?! Michael Moore and the camera make hot steamy love to…American business?

    In his newest documentary, Michael Moore, director of Sicko and Fahrenheit 9/11, reviews the romantic relationship between capitalism and the public in the United States. But it’s more a love-hate situation than you would think: in fact, Moore concentrates on how some of the rich love to benefit from those less fortunate in the current state of the economy.

    The opening scenes, a compilation of bank robberies, are symbolic of capitalism robbing America, which is Moore's message. Capitalism, as defined by many different people in this film, is “a system of taking and giving…mostly taking”--“tak[ing] advantage of other’s misfortune.” Focusing on the flaws of the economic system, Moore compiles examples of free enterprise ruining the lives of the working class. Kids who are sent to a privately owned juvenile hall without a proper chance to explain, while the facility and judge make money off of the corporal exchange. Companies like Walmart who make large sums of money as the beneficiaries once their clients or employees die. Pilots who live on food stamps. Workers who get laid off even though their company have procured taxpayers money. Moore successfully reveals to his audience how severely faulty the American economy is. Yet his anger seems to be misguided: Moore argues that the current system is closer to a plutonomy, where the wealthy few control the growth (or in today’s case, the decline) of the country's economic and social well being. He claims that “capitalism is an evil, and you can’t regulate evil" and warns that the original democratic intentions are becoming less and less apparent.

    But politics play a much larger role than the economy in how business is run in this country. Instead of focusing on restructuring the economic system, perhaps it is more reasonable to direct emotions and opinions at the government. His idea of bringing about change involves driving armored vehicles to company headquarters like AIG, demanding they return government supplements, threatening to make citizen’s arrests, and wrapping such buildings with crime scene tape. Oh, how effective. Without offering a probable solution to the flawed economics of society, Moore fails to fully educate his audience, only identifying the problem. But Moore does have a point. We are living with imperfect policies and if we ever want to see changes made, we do have to act. And soon.

    So exactly how does this apply to our lives? Us students, living in the shelter of our haven, Arcadia. Not many students have to deal with foreclosures on their houses or unjust employment cuts. But our parents might. Prevention is the best cure, some say, and in this case, prevention might be the only cure. It is extremely hard to make any large dent in the current system with petitions or strikes. We can, however, attempt to impact the future to prevent the government from additional damage.
    (still not sure where I am going with this)

    Though a bit lengthy at two hours, this film brings a new perspective to the so-called free pursuit of happiness in capitalism. While his focus may be slightly off center, Moore still uncovers the hidden injustice present in today’s economy.

    hanarudolph

    Posts : 152
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Capitalism Review

    Post  hanarudolph on Mon Oct 12, 2009 11:18 am

    In theaters this month: Where the Wild Things Are, Zombieland, Astroboy, and Capitalism: A Love Story. Wait, what?! Michael Moore and the camera make hot steamy love to…American business?

    In his newest documentary, Michael Moore, director of Sicko and Fahrenheit 9/11, reviews the romantic relationship between capitalism and the public in [reword to "of"] the United States. But it’s more a love-hate situation than you would think [delete "than you would think"]: in fact, Moore concentrates on how some of the rich love to benefit from those less fortunate in the current state of the economy [is "in the...economy" necessary?].

    The opening scenes, a compilation of bank robberies, are symbolic of capitalism robbing America, which is Moore's message. Capitalism, as defined by the many different people in this film, is “a system of taking and giving…mostly taking”--“tak[ing] advantage of other’s misfortune.” Focusing on the flaws of the economic system, Moore compiles [this word is repetitive with "compilation"] examples of free enterprise ruining the lives of the working class. Kids who [delete "who"] are sent to a privately owned juvenile hall without a proper chance to explain, while the facility and judge make money off of the corporal exchange. Companies like Walmart who [delete "who"] make large sums of money as the beneficiaries once their clients or employees die. Pilots who [delete "who"] live on food stamps. Workers who [delete "who"] get laid off even though their company have [reword to "has"] procured taxpayers money. Moore successfully reveals to his audience how severely faulty the American economy is. Yet his anger seems to be [delete "to be"] misguided: Moore argues that the current system is closer to a plutonomy, where the wealthy few control the growth (or in today’s case, the decline) of the country's economic and social well being. He claims that “capitalism is an evil, and you can’t regulate evil" and warns that the original democratic intentions are becoming less and less apparent.

    But politics play a much larger role than the economy in how business is run in this country [delete "in this country"]. Instead of focusing on restructuring the economic system, perhaps it is more reasonable to direct emotions and opinions at [reword to "towards"] the government. His idea of bringing about change involves driving armored vehicles to company headquarters like AIG, demanding they return government supplements, threatening to make citizen’s arrests, and wrapping such buildings with crime scene tape. Oh, how effective. Without offering a probable solution to the flawed economics of society, Moore fails to fully educate his audience, only identifying the problem. But Moore does have a point. We are living with imperfect policies and if we ever want to see changes made, we do [Delete "do"] have to act. And [Delete "and"] soon.
    I love the revisions you made, by the way!

    So exactly how does this apply to our lives? Us [reword to "we are only"] students, living in the shelter of our haven, [delete comma] Arcadia. Not many students have to deal with foreclosures on their houses or unjust employment cuts. But our parents might. Prevention is the best cure, some say, and in this case, prevention might be the only cure. It is extremely hard to make any large dent in the current system with petitions or strikes. We can, however, attempt to impact the future to prevent [change "to prevent" to "by preventing"] the government from causing furtheradditional [delete "additional"] damage [It was good until "impact the future" and then I lost you].
    (still not sure where I am going with this)

    Though a bit lengthy at two hours, this film brings a new perspective to the so-called free pursuit of happiness in capitalism. While his focus may be slightly off center, Moore still uncovers the hidden injustice present in today’s economy. [switch the placing of this paragraph with the one above; the above paragraph makes for a better conclusion]

    theresalee

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Capitalism Review

    Post  theresalee on Wed Oct 14, 2009 1:01 am

    In theaters this month: Where the Wild Things Are, Zombieland, Astroboy, and Capitalism: A Love Story. Wait, what?! Michael Moore and the camera make hot steamy love to…American business?

    In his newest documentary, Michael Moore, director of Sicko and Fahrenheit 9/11, reviews the romantic relationship between capitalism and the public of the United States. But it’s more a love-hate situation: in fact, Moore concentrates on how some of the rich love to benefit from those less fortunate in the current state of the economy.

    The opening scenes, a compilation of bank robberies, are symbolic of capitalism robbing America, which is Moore's message. Capitalism, as defined by the many different people in this film, is “a system of taking and giving…mostly taking”--“tak[ing] advantage of other’s misfortune.” Focusing on the flaws of the economic system, Moore shows examples of free enterprise ruining the lives of the working class. Kids are sent to a privately owned juvenile hall without a proper chance to explain, while the facility and judge make money off of the corporal exchange. Companies like Walmart make large sums of money as the beneficiaries once their clients or employees die. Pilots live on food stamps. Workers get laid off even though their company have procured taxpayers money. Moore successfully reveals to his audience how severely faulty the American economy is. Yet his anger seems misguided: Moore argues that the current system is closer to a plutonomy, where the wealthy few control the growth (or in today’s case, the decline) of the country's economic and social well being. He claims that “capitalism is an evil, and you can’t regulate evil" and warns that the original democratic intentions are becoming less and less apparent.

    But politics play a much larger role than the economy in how business is run. Instead of focusing on restructuring the economic system, perhaps it is more reasonable to direct emotions and opinions towards the government. His idea of bringing about change involves driving armored vehicles to company headquarters like AIG, demanding they return government supplements, threatening to make citizen’s arrests, and wrapping such buildings with crime scene tape. Oh, how effective. Without offering a probable solution to the flawed economics of society, Moore fails to fully educate his audience, only identifying the problem. But Moore does have a point. We are living with imperfect policies and if we ever want to see changes made, we have to act. Soon.

    Though a bit lengthy at two hours, this film brings a new perspective to the so-called free pursuit of happiness in capitalism. While his focus may be slightly off center, Moore still uncovers the hidden injustice present in today’s economy. So exactly how does this apply to our lives? We are only students, living in the shelter of our haven Arcadia. Not many students have to deal with foreclosures on their houses or unjust employment cuts. But our parents might. Prevention is the best cure, some say, and in this case, prevention might be the only cure. It is extremely hard to make any large dent in the current system with petitions or strikes. We can, however, attempt to impact the future by preventing the government from causing further damage. We have to take the initiative to be proactive in the happenings of society by being well informed about what and who we vote for. Most of you are not at the required age for voting rights yet, but the time is coming. So it's your job to be prepared when that time comes. And you can start by watching informative documentaries.

    (haha cheesy/corny ending)

    hanarudolph

    Posts : 152
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Capitalism Review

    Post  hanarudolph on Wed Oct 14, 2009 8:43 am

    Haha lol maybe but it's good Smile
    One more thing:

    The opening scenes, a compilation of bank robberies, are symbolic of capitalism robbing America, which is Moore's message. Capitalism, as defined by the many different people in this film, is “a system of taking and giving…mostly taking”--“tak[ing] advantage of other’s misfortune.” Focusing on the flaws of the economic system, Moore shows examples of free enterprise ruining the lives of the working class. Kids are sent to a privately owned juvenile hall without a proper chance to explain, while the facility and judge make money off of the corporal exchange. Companies like Walmart make large sums of money as the beneficiaries once their clients or employees die. Pilots live on food stamps. Workers get laid off even though their company have [change to has] procured taxpayers money. Moore successfully reveals to his audience how severely faulty the American economy is. Yet his anger seems misguided: Moore argues that the current system is closer to a plutonomy, where the wealthy few control the growth (or in today’s case, the decline) of the country's economic and social well being. He claims that “capitalism is an evil, and you can’t regulate evil" and warns that the original democratic intentions are becoming less and less apparent.

    theresalee

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Capitalism Review

    Post  theresalee on Mon Oct 19, 2009 10:56 am

    In theaters this month: Where the Wild Things Are, Zombieland, Astroboy, and Capitalism: A Love Story. Wait, what?! Michael Moore declares his love for…American business?

    In his newest documentary, Michael Moore, director of Sicko and Fahrenheit 9/11, reviews the romantic relationship between capitalism and the public of the United States. But it’s more a love-hate situation: in fact, Moore concentrates on how some of the rich love to benefit from those less fortunate in the current state of the economy.

    The opening scenes, a compilation of bank robberies, are symbolic of capitalism robbing America, which is Moore's message. Capitalism, as defined by the many different people in this film, is “a system of taking and giving…mostly taking” and also means to “take advantage of other’s misfortune.” Focusing on the flaws of the economic system, Moore shows examples of free enterprise ruining the lives of the working class. Kids are sent to a privately owned juvenile hall without a proper chance to explain, while the facility and judge make money off of the corporal exchange. Companies like Walmart make large sums of money as the beneficiaries once their clients or employees die. Moore successfully reveals to his audience how severely faulty the American economy is. Yet his anger seems misguided: Moore argues that the current system is closer to a plutonomy, where the wealthy few control the growth (or in today’s case, the decline) of the country's economic and social well being. He claims that “capitalism is an evil, and you can’t regulate evil" and warns that the original democratic intentions are becoming less and less apparent.

    But politics play a much larger role than the economy in how business is run. Instead of focusing on restructuring the economic system, perhaps it is more reasonable to direct emotions and opinions towards the government. His idea of bringing about change involves driving armored vehicles to company headquarters like AIG, demanding they return government supplements, threatening to make citizen’s arrests, and wrapping such buildings with crime scene tape. Oh, how effective. Without offering a probable solution to the flawed economics of society, Moore fails to fully educate his audience, only identifying the problem. But Moore does have a point. We are living with imperfect policies and if we ever want to see changes made, we have to act. Soon.

    Though a bit lengthy at two hours, this film brings a new perspective to the so-called free pursuit of happiness in capitalism. While his focus may be slightly off center, Moore still uncovers the hidden injustice present in today’s economy. So exactly how does this apply to our lives? We are only students, living in the shelter of our haven Arcadia. Not many students have to deal with foreclosures on their houses or unjust employment cuts. But our parents might. Prevention is the best cure, some say, and in this case, prevention might be the only cure. It is extremely hard to make any large dent in the current system. We can, however, attempt to impact the future by preventing the government from causing further damage. We have to take the initiative to be proactive in the happenings of society by being well informed about what and who we vote for. Most of you are not at the required age for voting rights yet, but the time is coming.And we cannot allow policies to push us around. Stand your ground with strikes and petitions. So it's your job to be prepared when that time comes. And you can start by watching informative documentaries.

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