The Pow Wow Forum

The Apache Pow Wow


    French article

    Share

    JadeShao

    Posts : 44
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    French article

    Post  JadeShao on Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:26 pm

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? We aren’t just talking about cities or even countries for that matter, its entirely different continents. Well, three very courageous people have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS, their names are: Bernard To, Hazel Limfat, and Alex Bellefin. They have all moved to Arcadia from either France, or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to Madame Vaughan, currently teaching all levels of French at AHS and who taught in Lyon last year, “The schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive amounts of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school in Mauritius of only 250 students where she was much more accustomed to the small environment and educational system. Madame Vaughan also notes that, “Their schedules are organized differently, and more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have 4 hours of chemistry and 7 hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” Talk about culture shock. However, Bernard, who used to live in Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because, “the days in between my schedule when I didn’t have math class set me in a state of mind where I was like "oh snap, I haven't done math for 3 days, I'm don’t feel like doing math tomorrow". Bernard is generally really glad he moved to Arcadia and says, “I've always been glad to experience new things and meet new people, moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.” Another interesting fact about the French education system is their grading scale, which is out of 20 and in order to pass a grade level you need to get a 10, which is the equivalent of a 70%. Can you imagine school without getting letter grades…no A’s or B’s…or 89.9999%’s. However, don’t pack your bags to move to France yet, because although you’ll never have to see another B+ on your paper…you’ll also never get a chance to play varsity tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech tournament of participate in a Model UN conference because…they don’t have ANY extracurricular activities. Bernard is really glad he moved to Arcadia, even though me misses his old home, and says, “I've always been glad to experience new things and meet new people, moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.” Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin who will be home-staying with another AHS student, Macie de Castro who can’t wait for Alex to arrive and exclaims, “I’m very excited about hosting Alex. We are already preparing his room and everything. My whole family is getting involved and we plan to go to the Concert of Hope, and Disneyland, and Universal Studios and PLENTY of beaches. I think Arcadia can help integrate the French students with its great diversity. Alex and other French kids can really see that America is exactly like TV shows such as the O.C. and One Tree Hill.” So if you see any of these students please help make sure they get to experience all the fantastic stereotypes and clichés of an average American high school and help them clue into our 91007 world.

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: French article

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Sat Oct 10, 2009 3:38 pm

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? We aren’t just talking about cities or even countries for that matter, its [it's] entirely different continents. Well, three very courageous people have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS, their names are: Bernard To, Hazel Limfat, and Alex Bellefin. [ Well, three very couargeous people, by the names of Bernard To, Hazel Limfat, and Alex Bellefin, have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS.] They have all moved to Arcadia from either France, or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to Madame Vaughan, currently teaching all levels of French at AHS and who taught in Lyon last year, “The schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive amounts of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school in Mauritius of only 250 students where she was much more accustomed to the small environment and educational system. Madame Vaughan also notes that, “Their schedules are organized differently, and more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have 4 hours of chemistry and 7 hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” Talk about culture shock. However, Bernard, who used to live in Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because, “the days in between my schedule [add comma] when I didn’t have math class[add comma] set me in a state of mind where I was like " ['(no quote inside a quote)]oh snap, I haven't done math for 3 days, I'm [I] don’t feel like doing math tomorrow[add apostraphie]".[period inside quotes] Bernard is generally really glad he moved to Arcadia and says, “I've always been glad to experience new things and meet new people, moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.” Another interesting fact about the French education system is their grading scale, which is out of 20[.] and [new sentence, delete and, capital In]in order to pass a grade level [,] you need to get a 10, which is the equivalent of a 70%. Can you imagine school without getting letter grades…no A’s or B’s…or 89.9999%’s. [?] However, don’t pack your bags to move to France yet, because although you’ll never have to see another B+ on your paper…you’ll also never get a chance to play varsity tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech tournament of participate in a Model UN conference because…they don’t have ANY extracurricular activities. Bernard is really glad he moved to Arcadia, even though me misses his old home, and says, “I've always been glad to experience new things and meet new people, moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.” [already said that earlier in the article]Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin who will be home-staying with another AHS student, Macie de Castro who can’t wait for Alex to arrive and exclaims, “I’m very excited about hosting Alex. We are already preparing his room and everything. My whole family is getting involved and we plan to go to the Concert of Hope, and Disneyland, and Universal Studios and PLENTY of beaches. I think Arcadia can help integrate the French students with its great diversity. Alex and other French kids can really see that America is exactly like TV shows such as the O.C. and One Tree Hill.” So[,] if you see any of these students [,] please help make sure they get to experience all the fantastic stereotypes and clichés of an average American high school and help them clue into our 91007 world.

    JadeShao

    Posts : 44
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    French article draft 2

    Post  JadeShao on Sat Oct 10, 2009 9:13 pm

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? We aren’t just talking about cities or even countries for that matter, it’s entirely different continents. Well, three very courageous people, by the names of Bernard To, Hazel Limfat, and Alex Bellefin, have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS. They have all moved to Arcadia from either France, or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to Madame Vaughan, currently teaching all levels of French at AHS and who taught in Lyon last year, “The schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive amounts of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school in Mauritius of only 250 students where she was much more accustomed to the small environment and educational system. Madame Vaughan also notes that, “Their schedules are organized differently, and more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have 4 hours of chemistry and 7 hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” Talk about culture shock. However, Bernard, who used to live in Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because, “the days in between my schedule, when I didn’t have math class, set me in a state of mind where I was like ‘oh snap, I haven't done math for 3 days, I don’t feel like doing math tomorrow’." Bernard is generally really glad he moved to Arcadia and says, “I've always been glad to experience new things and meet new people, moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.” Another interesting fact about the French education system is their grading scale, which is out of 20. In order to pass a grade level, you need to get a 10, which is the equivalent of a 70%. Can you imagine school without getting letter grades…no A’s or B’s…or 89.9999%s? However, don’t pack your bags to move to France yet, because although you’ll never have to see another B+ on your paper…you’ll also never get a chance to play varsity tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech tournament of participate in a Model UN conference because…they don’t have ANY extracurricular activities. Bernard is really glad he moved to Arcadia, even though me misses his old home, and says, “I've always been glad to experience new things and meet new people, moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.” Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin who will be home-staying with another AHS student, Macie de Castro who can’t wait for Alex to arrive and exclaims, “I’m very excited about hosting Alex. We are already preparing his room and everything. My whole family is getting involved and we plan to go to the Concert of Hope, and Disneyland, and Universal Studios and PLENTY of beaches. I think Arcadia can help integrate the French students with its great diversity. Alex and other French kids can really see that America is exactly like TV shows such as the O.C. and One Tree Hill.” So, if you see any of these students, please help make sure they get to experience all the fantastic stereotypes and clichés of an average American high school and help them clue into our 91007 world.

    JadeShao

    Posts : 44
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    French article draft #3

    Post  JadeShao on Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:33 am

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? We aren’t just talking about cities or even countries for that matter, it’s entirely different continents. Well, three very courageous people, by the names of Bernard To, Hazel Limfat, and Alex Bellefin, have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS. They have all moved to Arcadia from either France, or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to Madame Vaughan, currently teaching all levels of French at AHS and who taught in Lyon last year, “The schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive amounts of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school in Mauritius of only 250 students where she was much more accustomed to the small environment and educational system.
    Madame Vaughan also notes that, “Their schedules are organized differently, and more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have 4 hours of chemistry and 7 hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” Talk about culture shock. However, Bernard, who used to live in Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because, “the days in between my schedule, when I didn’t have math class, set me in a state of mind where I was like ‘oh snap, I haven't done math for 3 days, I don’t feel like doing math tomorrow’." Bernard is generally really glad he moved to Arcadia and says, “I've always been glad to experience new things and meet new people, moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.”
    Another interesting fact about the French education system is their grading scale, which is out of 20. In order to pass a grade level, you need to get a 10, which is the equivalent of a 70%. Can you imagine school without getting letter grades…no A’s or B’s…or 89.9999%s? However, don’t pack your bags to move to France yet, because although you’ll never have to see another B+ on your paper…you’ll also never get a chance to play varsity tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech tournament of participate in a Model UN conference because…they don’t have ANY extracurricular activities. Bernard is really glad he moved to Arcadia, even though me misses his old home, and says, “I've always been glad to experience new things and meet new people, moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.” Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin who will be home-staying with another AHS student, Macie de Castro who can’t wait for Alex to arrive and exclaims, “I’m very excited about hosting Alex. We are already preparing his room and everything. My whole family is getting involved and we plan to go to the Concert of Hope, and Disneyland, and Universal Studios and PLENTY of beaches. I think Arcadia can help integrate the French students with its great diversity. Alex and other French kids can really see that America is exactly like TV shows such as the O.C. and One Tree Hill.” So, if you see any of these students, please help make sure they get to experience all the fantastic stereotypes and clichés of an average American high school and help them clue into our 91007 world.

    JadeShao

    Posts : 44
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    draft 4

    Post  JadeShao on Tue Oct 13, 2009 11:11 pm

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? We aren’t just talking about cities or even countries for that matter, but entirely different continents. Well, three very courageous people, by the names of Bernard To (senior), Hazel Limfat (junior), and Alex Bellefin (senior), have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS. They have all moved to Arcadia from either France, or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to Madame Vaughan, our French teacher who taught in Lyon, France last year, “The schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive amount of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school in Mauritius with only 250 students where she was much more accustomed to the small environment and educational system.
    Madame Vaughan also notes that, “Their schedules are organized differently, and more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have four hours of chemistry and seven hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” The experience of culture shock must have been difficult. However, Bernard, who used to live in Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because, “the days in between my schedule, when I didn’t have math class, set me in a state of mind in which I automatically didn’t feel like doing math after three days without taking the class." Bernard doesn’t regret moving to Arcadia at all and says, “I’m always glad to experience new things and meet new people. Moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.”
    Another interesting fact about the French education system is their grading scale, which is out of 20. In order to pass a grade level, you need to get a 10, which is the equivalent of a 70%. Can you imagine school without getting letter grades…no A’s or B’s…or 89.9999%s? However, don’t pack your bags to move to France yet, because although you’ll never have to see another B+ on your paper…you’ll also never get a chance to play varsity tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech tournament or participate in a Model UN conference because they don’t have any extracurricular activities. Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin who is extremely excited to be introduced to all our schools different events this and will be hosted by an AHS student, senior Macie de Castro, who can’t wait for Alex to arrive. Macie exclaims, “I’m very excited about hosting Alex. We are already preparing his room and everything. My whole family is getting involved and we plan to go to the Concert of Hope, and Disneyland, and Universal Studios and plenty of beaches. I think Arcadia can help integrate the French students with its great diversity. Alex and other French kids can really see that America is exactly like TV shows such as the O.C. and One Tree Hill.” So, if you see any of these students, please help make sure they get to experience all the fantastic-ness of an average American high school and help them clue into our 91007 world.

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: French article

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Wed Oct 14, 2009 11:43 am

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? We aren’t just talking about cities or even countries for that matter, but entirely different continents. Well, three very courageous people, by the names of Bernard To (senior), Hazel Limfat (junior), and Alex Bellefin (senior), have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS. They have all moved to Arcadia from either France, or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to Madame Vaughan, our French teacher who taught in Lyon, France last year, “The schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive amount of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school in Mauritius with only 250 students[,] where she was much more accustomed to the small environment and educational system.
    Madame Vaughan also notes that, “Their schedules are organized differently, and more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have four hours of chemistry and seven hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” The experience of culture shock must have been difficult. However, Bernard, who used to live in Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because, “the days in between my schedule, when I didn’t have math class, set me in a state of mind in which I automatically didn’t feel like doing math after three days without taking the class." Bernard doesn’t regret moving to Arcadia at all and says, “I’m always glad to experience new things and meet new people. Moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.”
    Another interesting fact about the French education system is their grading scale, which is out of 20. In order to pass a grade level, you need to get a 10, which is the equivalent of a 70%. Can you imagine school without getting letter grades…no A’s or B’s…or 89.9999%s? However, don’t pack your bags to move to France yet, because although you’ll never have to see another B+ on your paper…you’ll also never get a chance to play varsity tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech tournament or participate in a Model UN conference because they don’t have any extracurricular activities. Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin[,] who is extremely excited to be introduced to all our schools different events this and will be hosted by an AHS student, senior Macie de Castro, who can’t wait for Alex to arrive. Macie exclaims, “I’m very excited about hosting Alex. We are already preparing his room and everything. My whole family is getting involved and we plan to go to the Concert of Hope, and Disneyland, and Universal Studios and plenty of beaches. I think Arcadia can help integrate the French students with its great diversity. Alex and other French kids can really see that America is exactly like TV shows such as the O.C. and One Tree Hill.” So, if you see any of these students, please help make sure they get to experience all the fantastic-ness of an average American high school and help them clue into our 91007 world.

    JadeShao

    Posts : 44
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    DRAFT 5

    Post  JadeShao on Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:01 pm

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? We aren’t just talking about cities or even countries for that matter, but entirely different continents. Well, three very courageous people, by the names of Bernard To (senior), Hazel Limfat (junior), and Alex Bellefin (senior), have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS. They have all moved to Arcadia from either France, or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to Madame Vaughan, our French teacher who taught in Lyon, France last year, “The schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive amount of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school in Mauritius with only 250 students, where she was much more accustomed to the small environment and educational system.
    Madame Vaughan also notes that, “Their schedules are organized differently, and more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have four hours of chemistry and seven hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” The experience of culture shock must have been difficult. However, Bernard, who used to live in Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because, “the days in between my schedule, when I didn’t have math class, set me in a state of mind in which I automatically didn’t feel like doing math after three days without taking the class." Bernard doesn’t regret moving to Arcadia at all and says, “I’m always glad to experience new things and meet new people. Moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.”
    Another interesting fact about the French education system is their grading scale, which is out of 20. In order to pass a grade level, you need to get a 10, which is the equivalent of a 70%. Can you imagine school without getting letter grades…no A’s or B’s…or 89.9999%s? However, don’t pack your bags to move to France yet, because although you’ll never have to see another B+ on your paper…you’ll also never get a chance to play varsity tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech tournament or participate in a Model UN conference because they don’t have any extracurricular activities. Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin, who is extremely excited to be introduced to all our schools different events this and will be hosted by an AHS student, senior Macie de Castro, who can’t wait for Alex to arrive. Macie exclaims, “I’m very excited about hosting Alex. We are already preparing his room and everything. My whole family is getting involved and we plan to go to the Concert of Hope, and Disneyland, and Universal Studios and plenty of beaches. I think Arcadia can help integrate the French students with its great diversity. Alex and other French kids can really see that America is exactly like TV shows such as the O.C. and One Tree Hill.” So, if you see any of these students, please help make sure they get to experience all the fantastic-ness of an average American high school and help them clue into our 91007 world.

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: French article

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Wed Oct 14, 2009 11:51 pm

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? We aren’t just talking about cities or even countries for that matter, but entirely different continents. Well, three very courageous people, by the names of Bernard To (senior), Hazel Limfat (junior), and Alex Bellefin (senior), have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS. They have all moved to Arcadia from either France, or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to Madame Vaughan, our French teacher who taught in Lyon, France last year, “The[the] schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive amount of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school in Mauritius with only 250 students, where she was much more accustomed to the small environment and educational system.
    Madame Vaughan also notes that, “Their[their] schedules are organized differently, and more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have four hours of chemistry and seven hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” The experience of culture shock must have been difficult. However, Bernard, who used to live in Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because, “the days in between my schedule, when I didn’t have math class, set me in a state of mind in which I automatically didn’t feel like doing math after three days without taking the class." Bernard doesn’t regret moving to Arcadia at all and says, “I’m always glad to experience new things and meet new people. Moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.”
    Another interesting fact about the French education system is their grading scale, which is out of 20. In order to pass a grade level, you need to get a 10, which is the equivalent of a 70%. Can you imagine school without getting letter grades…no A’s or B’s…or 89.9999%s? However, don’t pack your bags to move to France yet, because although you’ll never have to see another B+ on your paper…you’ll also never get a chance to play varsity tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech tournament or participate in a Model UN conference because they don’t have any extracurricular activities. Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin, who is extremely excited to be introduced to all our schools different events this and will be hosted by an AHS student, senior Macie de Castro, who can’t wait for Alex to arrive. Macie exclaims, “I’m very excited about hosting Alex. We are already preparing his room and everything. My whole family is getting involved and we plan to go to the Concert of Hope, and Disneyland, and Universal Studios and plenty of beaches. I think Arcadia can help integrate the French students with its great diversity. Alex and other French kids can really see that America is exactly like TV shows such as the O.C. and One Tree Hill.” So, if you see any of these students, please help make sure they get to experience all the fantastic-ness of an average American high school and help them clue into our 91007 world.

    JadeShao

    Posts : 44
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    DRAFT (freakin) #6

    Post  JadeShao on Fri Oct 16, 2009 4:47 pm

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? We aren’t just talking about cities or even countries for that matter, but entirely different continents. Well, three very courageous people, by the names of Bernard To (senior), Hazel Limfat (junior), and Alex Bellefin (senior), have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS. They have all moved to Arcadia from either France, or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to Madame Vaughan, our French teacher who taught in Lyon, France last year, “The[the] schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive amount of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school in Mauritius with only 250 students, where she was much more accustomed to the small environment and educational system.
    Madame Vaughan also notes that, “their schedules are organized differently, and more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have four hours of chemistry and seven hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” The experience of culture shock must have been difficult. However, Bernard, who used to live in Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because, “the days in between my schedule, when I didn’t have math class, set me in a state of mind in which I automatically didn’t feel like doing math after three days without taking the class." Bernard doesn’t regret moving to Arcadia at all and says, “I’m always glad to experience new things and meet new people. Moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.”
    Another interesting fact about the French education system is their grading scale, which is out of 20. In order to pass a grade level, you need to get a 10, which is the equivalent of a 70%. Can you imagine school without getting letter grades…no A’s or B’s…or 89.9999%s? However, don’t pack your bags to move to France yet, because although you’ll never have to see another B+ on your paper…you’ll also never get a chance to play varsity tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech tournament or participate in a Model UN conference because they don’t have any extracurricular activities. Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin, who is extremely excited to be introduced to all our schools different events this and will be hosted by an AHS student, senior Macie de Castro, who can’t wait for Alex to arrive. Macie exclaims, “I’m very excited about hosting Alex. We are already preparing his room and everything. My whole family is getting involved and we plan to go to the Concert of Hope, and Disneyland, and Universal Studios and plenty of beaches. I think Arcadia can help integrate the French students with its great diversity. Alex and other French kids can really see that America is exactly like TV shows such as the O.C. and One Tree Hill.” So, if you see any of these students, please help make sure they get to experience all the fantastic-ness of an average American high school and help them clue into our 91007 world.

    katetrinh

    Posts : 31
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: French article

    Post  katetrinh on Sat Oct 17, 2009 5:08 pm

    EDITED. almost final.

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? Three very courageous people, junior Hazel Limfat and seniors Bernard To and Alex Bellefin, have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS. They have all moved to Arcadia from either France or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to AHS French teacher Madame Vaughan, “the schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive amount of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school in Mauritius with only 250 students, where she was much more accustomed to the small environment and educational system.
    Madame Vaughan also notes that “their schedules are organized differently, and more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have four hours of chemistry and seven hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” Bernard, who used to live in Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because “the days in between my schedule, when I didn’t have math class, set me in a state of mind in which I automatically didn’t feel like doing math after three days without taking the class." [can’t just edit people’s quotes like that.] Bernard doesn’t regret moving to Arcadia at all and says, “I’m always glad to experience new things and meet new people. Moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.”
    Another interesting fact about the French education system is its grading scale, which is based on a point system out of 20. In order to pass a grade level, students need to get a 10, which is equivalent to a C. Imagine school without letter grades and the dreaded 89.99%. However, don’t pack your bags to move to France yet, because although you’ll never have to see another B+ on your paper, you’ll also never get a chance to play varsity tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech and Debate tournament or participate in a Model UN conference because French schools don’t have any extracurricular activities.
    Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin, who is extremely excited to be introduced to all of our school’s different events this year. He will be hosted by AHS senior Macie de Castro, who can’t wait for Alex to arrive. Macie exclaims, “I’m very excited about hosting Alex. We are already preparing his room and everything. My whole family is getting involved and we plan to go to the Concert of Hope, and Disneyland, and Universal Studios and plenty of beaches. I think Arcadia can help integrate the French students with its great diversity.” [CHANGE QUOTE? if alex is already here by the time the issue is out, this quote would not work.]

    JadeShao

    Posts : 44
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    French article

    Post  JadeShao on Mon Oct 26, 2009 8:12 pm

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? Three very courageous people, junior Hazel Limfat and seniors Bernard To and Alex Bellefin, have braved the journey and come to our very own AHS. They have all moved to Arcadia from either France or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to AHS French teacher Madame Vaughan, “the schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive amount of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school in Mauritius with only 250 students, where she was much more accustomed to the small environment and educational system.
    Madame Vaughan also notes that “their schedules are organized differently, and more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have four hours of chemistry and seven hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” Bernard, who used to live in Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because “After several days of not having math, for example, I would gradually sink into a state of mind in which I automatically wouldn’t do my math homework.” Bernard doesn’t regret moving to Arcadia at all and says, “I’m always glad to experience new things and meet new people. Moving here wasn't an opportunity to miss.”
    Another interesting fact about the French education system is its grading scale, which is based on a point system out of 20. In order to pass a grade level, students need to get a 10, which is equivalent to a C. Imagine school without letter grades and the dreaded 89.99%. However, don’t pack your bags to move to France yet, because although you’ll never have to see another B+ on your paper, you’ll also never get a chance to play varsity tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech and Debate tournament or participate in a Model UN conference because French schools don’t have any extracurricular activities.
    Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin, who is extremely excited to be introduced to all of our school’s different events this year. Alex notes, “In France, recreational activities are only available outside of school. We go to clubs, concerts and movies when we want a break from all our classes.” However, upon his arrival to the United States, Alex recently experienced the vastly different Californian life after going to Manhattan Beach and seeing the Pacific Ocean for the first time, tasting his first In-and-Out Burger and attending his first Miley Cyrus concert. Alex comments that, “California is definitely the most beautiful state in America that I’ve seen and I look forward to seeing and experiencing all the different things it has to offer.”

    katetrinh

    Posts : 31
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    FINAL COPY

    Post  katetrinh on Fri Nov 06, 2009 12:42 pm

    AU REVOIR FRANCE, HELLO ARCADIA

    Can you imagine moving from one end of the globe to the other? Three very courageous people, junior Hazel Limfat and seniors Bernard To and Alex Bellefin, have braved the journey and come to AHS. They have all moved to Arcadia from either France or a “pays de francophone” (French-speaking country). According to French teacher Madame Vaughan, “the schools in France are completely different from ours. A typical French student will have classes with the same group of people the entire year studying 12 subjects, whereas at Arcadia, you guys see different people everyday and you have the same six periods all of first and second semester.” Hazel’s first impression of AHS was sheer shock at the massive number of students milling through the halls. She had previously gone to a school on the small French-speaking island of Mauritius off the coast of Africa, where she was much more accustomed to the education system and small environment of only 250 students.

    Madame Vaughan also notes that “their schedules are organized differently, more like a university where they have longer class hours but not the same classes everyday. For example, they may have four hours of chemistry and seven hours of math, but not have English that day. Also, French students typically have random holes in their schedule where they have no class at all. It’s just totally different.” Bernard, who lived in Paris, feels that our rigid class schedules make it easier to work on a regular basis because “the days in between my schedule, when I didn’t have math class set me in a state of mind in which I didn’t feel like doing math after three days without taking the class.” Bernard exclaims, “I’m always glad to experience new things and meet new people. Moving here wasn’t an opportunity to miss.”

    Another interesting fact about the French education system is its grading scale, which is based on a point system out of 20. In order to pass a grade level, students need to get a 10, the equivalent of a C, which means you will never have to see the dreaded 89.99% again. However, don’t pack your bags to move to France just yet. You will also never get a chance to play Varsity Tennis, march in a field show, compete in a Speech and Debate tournament or participate in a Model UN conference because French schools don’t have any extracurricular activities.

    Our last French guest is Alex Bellefin, who is extremely excited to be introduced to all of our school’s different events this year. Alex notes, “In France, recreational activities are only available outside of school. We go to clubs, concerts and movies when we want a break from all our classes.” However, upon his arrival to the United States, Alex recently experienced the vastly different Californian life after going to Manhattan Beach and seeing the Pacific Ocean for the first time, tasting his first In-and-Out Burger and attending his first Miley Cyrus concert. Alex comments that, “California is definitely the most beautiful state in America that I’ve seen and I look forward to seeing and experiencing all the different things it has to offer.”

    jshao@apachepowwow.com

    Sponsored content

    Re: French article

    Post  Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Sun Dec 17, 2017 2:05 am