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    Make Music Foundation

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    evandelgado

    Posts : 47
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Make Music Foundation

    Post  evandelgado on Mon Oct 19, 2009 8:03 am

    Make Music Foundation Brings to Music to the Unfortunate
    By Evan Delgado
    On Oct. 24, the Make Music Foundation held a concert at the Arcadia Presbyterian Church. ETC ETC ETC

    The Make Music Foundation is a student-based club that is an essential part of the Harmony Project. Their main objective is to raise money to bring music to children who are financially deprived and cannot afford to gain musical education on their own. All if the MMF’s officers have an extensive musical education, and believe that every child should have an opportunity to follow their passion. Many of the members of the Make Music Foundation believe that music can be life changing, and have allowed the foundation to take over their lives. The foundation soon hopes to become a nonprofit group.

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Make Music Foundation

    Post  ashleychi on Sun Oct 25, 2009 3:30 pm

    By Ashley Chi and Evan Delgado
    On Oct. 24, the Make Music Foundation, a faction of the Harmony Project, held a concert at the Arcadia Presbyterian Church. The airy room was soon filled with people of all ages and backgrounds, murmuring excitedly among themselves, with an air of excitement in the air. As the lights dimmed and the charismatic host Tom Ngo came out onto stage, the crowd began to cheer in anticipation of the spectacular concert that was about to start. The string of musical acts began with Sam Hart, who rose to prominence through his popular tune “Mario Kart Love Song” on YouTube. People of notable fame and local performers alike came to perform, showcasing new talent along with experienced performers such as Feats in Inches and AJ Rafael.

    John Ford, an attendee, described the performers as “all talented” and performed “very well.” The crowd response was alike and the same, with the audience clapping along and cheering at the fervent enthusiasm of Clara Chung and Ashley Luu, and quietly taking in Sam Hart’s and Jennifer Chung’s emotional ballads. Christine Lo, president of the Make Music Foundation (MMF), said that the “concert was great, [even though] it [ran] a little long[er than expected]. I didn’t expect a full house, and [the concert] was definitely worth all the work that was put into it.” The proceeds that were made by this concert will go to the Harmony Project. Everyone who attended the concert left in awe of the coalition of talented individuals. Attendee Lorraine Kimura thought that the concert was “a huge success, and really highlighted the local talent.”

    The Make Music Foundation was started when president Christine Lo shared an idea with current treasurer Eileen Yoon. The idea was an organization led by students that would raise money for music. Christine Lo states that they started out as “five friends [who] decided to act on the fact that [they] all share a love for music.” These friends, now officers, have an extensive musical education. At first, they didn’t know which charity they would raise money for, but what they did know that they all had in common was their love for music. After much research, the club found out about the Harmony Project, an organization founded by Margaret Martin.

    The Harmony Project’s main goal is to provide musical education for children who are financially deprived and cannot afford to gain the education on their own. The unique aspect of the Harmony Project is that the foundation continues to provide musical education for children all throughout their youth. “The best part is seeing the kids discover their own potentials,” Ms. Martin says, confirming the success of the foundation. The MMF’s and Harmony Project’s goals are closely intertwined, with the MMF members believe that music can be life changing, and have allowed the foundation to take over their lives. All of the MMF’s officers believe that every child should have an opportunity to follow their passion.

    Since last summer, when the Make Music Foundation only had five members, it has grown to over 30 members, all who share a passion for music. The Harmony Project has influenced hundreds of lives and allowed the unfortunate to have a chance at a life they never would have had. The Harmony Project adheres to the belief that music is essential to the healthy growth of children, and that where you are born or the money you have should not prevent you from following your dreams. Aurelia Brambila, a student who has been a part of the Harmony Project for eight years, says that the musical education has helped her to be “more outgoing and social.” Her advice to everyone: “Open you mind to music.”

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Make Music Foundation

    Post  ashleychi on Sun Oct 25, 2009 3:59 pm

    EDIT 2

    By Ashley Chi and Evan Delgado
    On Oct. 24, the Make Music Foundation, a faction of the Harmony Project, held a benefit concert at the Arcadia Presbyterian Church. The spacious room was soon filled with people of all ages and backgrounds, murmuring excitedly among themselves, with an air of excitement in the atmosphere. As the lights dimmed and the charismatic host Tom Ngo came out onto stage, the crowd began to cheer in anticipation of the spectacular concert that was about to start. The string of musical acts began with Sam Hart, who rose to prominence through his popular tune “Mario Kart Love Song” on YouTube. People of notable fame and local performers alike came to perform, showcasing new talent along with experienced performers.

    John Ford, an attendee, described all of the performers as “talented” and that they performed “very well.” The crowd response was alike and the same, with the audience clapping along and cheering at the fervent enthusiasm of Clara Chung and Feats in Inches, and quietly taking in AJ Rafael’s and Jennifer Chung’s emotional ballads. Christine Lo, president of the Make Music Foundation (MMF), said that the “concert was great, [even though] it [ran] a little long[er than expected]. I didn’t expect a full house, and [the concert] was definitely worth all the work that was put into it.” Everyone who attended the concert left in awe of the coalition of talented individuals. Attendee Lorraine Kimura thought that the concert was “a huge success, and really highlighted the local talent.” The goal of the benefit concert was to raise funds for the Harmony Project, an organization that holds similar values as the MMF.

    The Make Music Foundation was started when president Christine Lo shared an idea with reasurer Eileen Yoon. The idea? An organization, led by students, that would raise money for music. Christine Lo states that they started out as “five friends [who] decided to act on the fact that [they] all share a love for music.” These friends, now officers, each have an extensive musical education. At first, they didn’t know which charity they would raise money for, but what they did know that they all had in common was their love for music. After much research, the club found the Harmony Project, an organization founded by Margaret Martin.

    The Harmony Project’s main goal is to provide musical education for children who are financially deprived and cannot afford to gain the education on their own. The unique aspect of the Harmony Project is that the foundation continues to provide musical education for children all throughout their youth. “The best part is seeing the kids discover their own potentials,” Ms. Martin says, confirming the success of the foundation. The MMF’s and Harmony Project’s goals are closely intertwined, with MMF members valuing the life-changing aspect of music. All of the MMF’s officers believe that every child should have an opportunity to follow their passion.

    Since last summer, the Make Music Foundation has grown from a five member organization to one with over 30 members, all who share a passion for music. The Harmony Project and MMF have influenced many lives and allowed the less fortunate to have a chance at a life they never would have had. Both organizations adhere to the belief that music is essential to the healthy growth of children, and that where a person was born or anyone’s economical status should not prevent a person from following his or her dreams. Aurelia Brambila, a student who has been a part of the Harmony Project for eight years and a person who encompasses everything the Harmony Project and MMF stands for, says that the musical education the Harmony Project has provided has helped her to be “more outgoing and social.” Her advice to everyone: “Open your mind to music.”

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Make Music Foundation

    Post  ashleychi on Sun Oct 25, 2009 11:04 pm

    EDIT 3

    By Ashley Chi and Evan Delgado
    On Oct. 24, the Make Music Foundation, a faction of the Harmony Project, held a benefit concert at the Arcadia Presbyterian Church. The spacious room was filled with people of all ages and backgrounds, murmuring excitedly among themselves, with an air of excitement in the atmosphere. As the lights dimmed and the charismatic host Tom Ngo came out onto stage, the crowd began to cheer in anticipation of the spectacular concert that was about to start. The string of musical acts began with Sam Hart, who rose to prominence through his popular tune “Mario Kart Love Song” on YouTube. People of notable fame and local performers alike came to perform, showcasing new talent along with experienced performers.

    John Ford, an attendee, described all of the performers as “talented” and that they performed “very well.” The crowd response was alike and the same, with the audience clapping along and cheering at the fervent enthusiasm of Clara Chung and Feats in Inches, and quietly taking in AJ Rafael’s and Jennifer Chung’s emotional ballads. Christine Lo, president of the Make Music Foundation (MMF), said that the “concert was great, [even though] it [ran] a little long[er than expected]. I didn’t expect a full house, and [the concert] was definitely worth all the work that was put into it.” Everyone who attended the concert left in awe of the coalition of talented individuals. Attendee Lorraine Kimura thought that the concert was “a huge success, and really highlighted the local talent.” The goal of the benefit concert was to raise funds for the Harmony Project, an organization that holds similar values as the MMF.

    The Make Music Foundation took off when president Christine Lo shared an idea with reasurer Eileen Yoon. The idea? An organization, led by students, that would raise money for music. Christine Lo states that they started out as “five friends [who] decided to act on the fact that [they] all share a love for music.” These friends, now officers, each have xtensive musical backgrounds. At first, they didn’t know which charity they would raise money for, but they did know that they all shared a love for music. After much research, the club found the Harmony Project, an organization founded by Margaret Martin.

    The Harmony Project’s main goal is to provide musical education for children who are financially deprived and cannot afford to gain the education on their own. The unique aspect of the Harmony Project is that the foundation continues to provide musical education for children all throughout their youth. “The best part is seeing the kids discover their own potentials,” Ms. Martin says, confirming the success of the foundation. The MMF’s and Harmony Project’s goals are closely intertwined, with MMF members valuing the life-changing aspect of music. All of the MMF’s officers believe that every child should have an opportunity to follow their passion.

    Since last summer, the Make Music Foundation has grown from a five member organization to one with over 30 members, all who share a passion for music. The Harmony Project and MMF have influenced many lives and allowed the less fortunate to have a chance at a life they never would have had. Both organizations adhere to the belief that music is essential to the healthy growth of children, and that where a person was born or a person’s economical status should not prevent anyone from following his or her dreams. Aurelia Brambila, a student who has been a part of the Harmony Project for eight years and a person who encompasses everything the Harmony Project and MMF stands for, says that the musical education the Harmony Project has provided has helped her to be “more outgoing and sociable.” Her advice to everyone: “Open your mind to music.”

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Make Music Foundation

    Post  ashleychi on Sun Oct 25, 2009 11:38 pm

    EDIT 4

    By Ashley Chi and Evan Delgado
    On Oct. 24, the Make Music Foundation, a faction of the Harmony Project, held a benefit concert at the Arcadia Presbyterian Church. The spacious room was filled with people of all ages and backgrounds, murmuring excitedly among themselves, with an air of excitement in the atmosphere. As the lights dimmed and the charismatic host Tom Ngo came out onto stage, the crowd began to cheer in anticipation of the spectacular concert that was about to start. The string of musical acts began with Sam Hart, who had risen to prominence through his popular tune “Mario Kart Love Song” on YouTube. People of notable fame and local performers alike came to perform, showcasing new talent along with experienced performers.

    John Ford, an attendee, described all of the performers as “talented” and that they performed “very well.” The crowd response was alike and the same, with the audience clapping along and cheering at the fervent enthusiasm of Clara Chung and Feats in Inches, and quietly taking in AJ Rafael’s and Jennifer Chung’s emotional ballads. Christine Lo, president of the Make Music Foundation (MMF), said that the “concert was great, [even though] it [ran] a little long[er than expected]. I didn’t expect a full house, and [the concert] was definitely worth all the work that was put into it.” Everyone who attended the concert left in awe of the coalition of talented individuals. Attendee Lorraine Kimura thought that the concert was “a huge success, and really highlighted the local talent.” The goal of the benefit concert was to raise funds for the Harmony Project, an organization that holds similar values as the MMF.

    The Make Music Foundation took off when president Christine Lo shared an idea with reasurer Eileen Yoon. The idea? An organization, led by students, that would raise money for music. Christine Lo states that they started out as “five friends [who] decided to act on the fact that [they] all share a love for music.” These friends, now officers, each have xtensive musical backgrounds. At first, they didn’t know which charity they would raise money for, but they did know that they all shared a love for music. After much research, the club found the Harmony Project, an organization founded by Margaret Martin.

    The Harmony Project’s main goal is to provide musical education for children who are financially deprived and cannot afford to gain the education on their own. The unique aspect of the Harmony Project is that the foundation continues to provide musical education for children all throughout their youth. “The best part is seeing the kids discover their own potentials,” Ms. Martin says, confirming the success of the foundation. She also adds that “with enough financial support, we can turn LA's gang-ridden neighborhoods around, because music speaks to everyone.” The MMF’s and Harmony Project’s goals are closely intertwined, with MMF members valuing the life-changing aspect of music. All of the MMF’s officers believe that every child should have an opportunity to follow their passion.

    Since last summer, the Make Music Foundation has grown from a five member organization to one with over 30 members, all who share a passion for music. The Harmony Project and MMF have influenced many lives and allowed the less fortunate to have a chance at a life they never would have had. Both organizations adhere to the belief that music is essential to the healthy growth of children, and that where a person was born or a person’s economical status should not prevent anyone from following his or her dreams. Aurelia Brambila, a student who has been a part of the Harmony Project for eight years and a person who encompasses everything the Harmony Project and MMF stands for, says that the musical education the Harmony Project has provided has helped her to be “more outgoing and sociable.” Her advice to everyone: “Open your mind to music.”

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