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    Apaches Get Political

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    alexethridge

    Posts : 33
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Apaches Get Political

    Post  alexethridge on Mon Nov 09, 2009 8:47 am

    Most students at Arcadia High School live in a self-imposed bubble that shields them from the happenings of the real world. Why should they care about Obama’s healthcare reform when they already have color guard rehearsal, Chemistry midterms, and baseball practice to deal with? Some students, however, are popping their bubbles by showing an interest in political events that concern the entire nation and taking action in organizations both on and off campus that make their voices heard.
    The two prominent political clubs on campus are the Young Republicans and Young Democrats club. Both clubs are places where students interested in politics can discuss current issues that are happening outside of the school, share their opinion on government bills and laws, and overall serve as an outlet to voice personal thoughts that would seem out of place in normal lunch-time conversation. Both clubs also volunteer at political organizations such as the Young Republicans’ Letters for the Troops event last year to support the beliefs of their political parties.
    In addition to learning more about our nation’s policies, there are multiple benefits to joining a political party club on campus, such as learning how to form your own opinion. Senior Andrew Hong and President of Young Republicans says, “Belonging to a political party as a student gives you more of a say, so that we aren't following [others’ opinions] blindly like sheep.” Another benefit of belonging to a political party’s club and becoming interested in politics is subsequently interested in voting. While the most recent presidential election garnered many votes from eligible voters, there is still a large majority of the population that does not vote and therefore leaving a large majority of the population unrepresented. Junior Monica Ma, President of the Young Democrats Clubs, says, “I know a lot of people feel that their votes don’t matter or that the process is corrupt but as democratic citizens we should believe it is our obligation to vote! There are so many people in other nations that wish for their vote. Americans should not take their privileges for granted!”
    The presidents of these clubs are just two of the various students at AHS who have formed their political opinions at a young age. Ma got her start in politics during the infamous 2008 elections between Barack Obama and John McCain when she began volunteering at the campaign for a congressional candidate. In response to how he became interested in politics, Hong says, “I feel that it's important to know and have a say in how our country is run so one day I [can] voice my opinions and exercise my rights to shape the government accordingly to my needs.” Although they belong to opposing political parties, Hong and Ma both see the value in being politically aware as teenager, and while they may not be able to vote yet, they will be well informed by the time they can. Ma voices her opinion on the matter, saying, “I don't think it’s essential for students to align themselves to a party so early, but as the next generation of voters, we shouldn't simply fall in line with our parents' views. It's our obligations to get informed and form our own educated opinions on matters that will shape our future.”
    In addition to the students who are involved in politics on campus, there are others who participate in campaigns outside of school. Junior Ray Chao also started his political career during the 2008 elections when he began publicly displaying his support for Barack Obama. Now, as the Los Angeles Regional Director and Arcadia Chapter Coordinator of Gavin Newsom’s campaign for governor, Chao has demonstrated his efforts to make his voice heard. “Students for Gavin Newsom has built their organization upon the belief that students can significantly influence the outcome of any election,” he says. While Newsom’s campaign has ended since, it is unlikely that Chao will cease his participation in politics. “I hope to inspire the next generation of voters to start getting involved in the electoral process as early as possible.”
    Young Democrats meets every Monday at lunch in room J28, and Young Republicans meets every Monday at lunch in J3. Whether you’re conservative or liberal, or just want to know what SNL’s political skits are about, get out there and let your voice be heard!

    katetrinh

    Posts : 31
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Apaches Get Political

    Post  katetrinh on Mon Nov 09, 2009 12:52 pm

    semi-edited.

    Most students at Arcadia High School live in a self-imposed bubble that shields them from the happenings of the real world. Why should they care about Obama’s healthcare reform when they already have Colorguard rehearsal, chemistry midterms, and baseball practice to deal with? Some students, however, are popping their bubbles by showing an interest in political events that concern the entire nation and taking action in organizations both on and off campus that make their voices heard.
    The two prominent political clubs on campus are the Young Republicans and Young Democrats. Both clubs allow students interested in politics to discuss current issues that are happening outside of the school, share their opinions on government bills and laws, and voice their personal thoughts that would seem out of place in normal lunch-time conversation. Club members also volunteer at political organizations, like last year’s Young Republicans’ Letters for the Troops event, to support the beliefs of their political parties.
    In addition to learning more about our nation’s policies, there are multiple benefits to joining a political party club on campus, such as learning how to form your own opinion. President of Young Republicans, senior Andrew Hong, expresses, “Belonging to a political party as a student gives you more of a say, so that we aren't following [others’ opinions] blindly like sheep.” Another benefit of belonging to a political party’s club and becoming interested in politics is subsequently interested in voting [can you reword this? It’s kind of confusing]. While the most recent presidential election garnered many votes, a large portion of the population still does not vote, leaving a fraction of the population unrepresented. Junior Monica Ma, President of the Young Democrats Club, encourages, “I know a lot of people feel that their votes don’t matter or that the process is corrupt but as democratic citizens we should believe it is our obligation to vote! There are so many people in other nations that wish for their vote. Americans should not take their privileges for granted!”
    The presidents of these clubs are just two of the many students at AHS who have formed their political opinions at a young age. Monica got her start in politics during the 2008 elections between Barack Obama and John McCain when she began volunteering at the campaign for a congressional candidate. In response to how he became interested in politics, Andrew explains, “I feel that it's important to know and have a say in how our country is run so one day I [can] voice my opinions and exercise my rights to shape the government accordingly to my needs.” Although they belong to opposing political parties, Andrew and Monica both see the value in being politically aware as teenagers, and while they may not be able to vote yet, they will be well informed by the time they can. Monica voices, “I don't think it’s essential for students to align themselves to a party so early, but as the next generation of voters, we shouldn't simply fall in line with our parents' views. It's our obligation to get informed and form our own educated opinions on matters that will shape our future.”
    In addition to the students who are involved in politics on campus, there are others who participate in campaigns outside of school. Junior Ray Chao also started his political career during the 2008 elections when he began publicly displaying his support for Barack Obama. Now, as the Los Angeles Regional Director and Arcadia Chapter Coordinator of Gavin Newsom’s campaign for governor, Ray has demonstrated his efforts to make his voice heard. “Students for Gavin Newsom has built their organization upon the belief that students can significantly influence the outcome of any election,” he says. While Newsom’s campaign has ended since, it is unlikely that Chao will cease his participation in politics. “I hope to inspire the next generation of voters to start getting involved in the electoral process as early as possible.”
    Young Democrats meets every Monday at lunch in room J28, and Young Republicans meets every Monday at lunch in J3. Whether you’re conservative or liberal, or just want to know what SNL’s political skits are about, get out there and let your voice be heard!

    Joanna Liao

    Posts : 161
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 23

    Copy Edit #1

    Post  Joanna Liao on Tue Nov 10, 2009 9:11 pm

    Most students at Arcadia High School live in a self-imposed bubble that shields them from the happenings of the real world. Why should they care about Obama’s healthcare reform when they already have Colorguard rehearsal, chemistry (capitalize chemistry) midterms, and baseball practice to deal with? Some students, however, are popping their bubbles by showing an interest in political events that concern the entire nation and taking action in organizations both on and off campus that make their voices heard.
    The two prominent political clubs on campus are the Young Republicans and Young Democrats. Both clubs allow students interested in politics to discuss current issues that are happening outside of the school, share their opinions on government bills and laws, and voice their personal thoughts that would seem out of place in normal lunch-time conversation. Club members also volunteer at political organizations, like last year’s Young Republicans’ Letters for the Troops event, to support the beliefs of their political parties.
    In addition to learning more about our nation’s policies, there are multiple benefits to joining a political party club on campus, such as learning how to form your own opinion. President of Young Republicans, senior Andrew Hong, expresses, “Belonging to a political party as a student gives you more of a say, so that we aren't following [others’ opinions] blindly like sheep.” Another benefit of belonging to a political party’s club and becoming interested in politics is subsequently interested in voting [can you reword this? It’s kind of confusing]. While the most recent presidential election garnered many votes, a large portion of the population still does not vote, leaving a fraction of the population unrepresented. Junior Monica Ma, President of the Young Democrats Club, encourages, “I know a lot of people feel that their votes don’t matter or that the process is corrupt but as democratic citizens we should believe it is our obligation to vote! There are so many people in other nations that wish for their vote. Americans should not take their privileges for granted!”
    The presidents of these clubs are just two of the many students at AHS who have formed their political opinions at a young age. Monica got her start in politics during the 2008 elections between Barack Obama and John McCain when she began volunteering at the campaign for a congressional candidate. In response to how he became interested in politics, Andrew explains, “I feel that it's important to know and have a say in how our country is run so one day I [can] voice my opinions and exercise my rights to shape the government accordingly to my needs.” Although they belong to opposing political parties, Andrew and Monica both see the value in being politically aware as teenagers, and while they may not be able to vote yet, they will be well informed by the time they can. Monica voices, “I don't think it’s essential for students to align themselves to a party so early, but as the next generation of voters, we shouldn't simply fall in line with our parents' views. It's our obligation to get informed and form our own educated opinions on matters that will shape our future.”
    In addition to the students who are involved in politics on campus, there are others who participate in campaigns outside of school. Junior Ray Chao also started his political career during the 2008 elections when he began publicly displaying his support for Barack Obama. Now, as the Los Angeles Regional Director and Arcadia Chapter Coordinator of Gavin Newsom’s campaign for governor, Ray has demonstrated his efforts to make his voice heard. (awk reword) “Students for Gavin Newsom has built their organization upon the belief that students can significantly influence the outcome of any election,” he says. While Newsom’s campaign has ended since, it is unlikely that Chao (Ray Chao) will cease his participation in politics. “I hope to inspire the next generation of voters to start getting involved in the electoral process as early as possible.”
    Young Democrats meets every Monday at lunch in room J28, and Young Republicans meets every Monday at lunch in J3. Whether you’re conservative or liberal, or just want to know what SNL’s political skits are about, get out there and let your voice be heard!

    debbiejong

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Apaches Get Political

    Post  debbiejong on Wed Nov 11, 2009 1:07 pm

    EDIT 2

    Most students at Arcadia High School [AHS] live in a self-imposed bubble that shields them from the happenings of the real world. Why should they care about Obama’s healthcare [health care] reform when they already have Colorguard rehearsal, chemistry [Chemistry] midterms, and baseball practice to deal with? Some students, however, are popping their bubbles by [and] showing an interest in political events that concern the entire nation and [by] taking action [participating?] in organizations both on and off campus that make their voices heard.

    The two prominent political clubs on campus are the Young Republicans and [the] Young Democrats. Both clubs allow students interested in politics to discuss current issues that are happening outside of the school, share their opinions on government bills and laws, and voice their personal thoughts that would seem out of place in normal lunch-time conversation. Club members also volunteer at political organizations, like last year’s Young Republicans’ Letters for the Troops event, to support the beliefs of their political parties.

    In addition to learning more about our nation’s policies, there are multiple benefits to joining a political party club on campus, such as learning how to form your own opinion [opinions]. President of Young Republicans, senior Andrew Hong, expresses [expressed], “Belonging to a political party as a student gives you more of a say, so that we aren't following [others’ opinions] blindly like sheep.” Another benefit of belonging to a political party’s club and becoming interested in politics is subsequently interested in voting [can you reword this? It’s kind of confusing]. While the most recent presidential election garnered many votes, a large portion of the population still does not vote, leaving a fraction of the population unrepresented. Junior Monica Ma, President of the Young Democrats Club, encourages [encouraged], “I know a lot of people feel that their votes don’t matter or that the process is corrupt but as democratic citizens we should believe it is our obligation to vote! There are so many people in other nations that [who] wish for their vote. Americans should not take their privileges for granted!”

    The presidents of these clubs are just two of the many students at AHS who have formed their political opinions at a young age. Monica got her start in politics during the 2008 [presidential] elections between Barack Obama and John McCain when she began volunteering [volunteered] at the campaign for a congressional candidate. In response to how he became interested in politics, Andrew explains [explained], “I feel that it's important to know and have a say in how our country is run so one day I [can] voice my opinions and exercise my rights to shape the government accordingly to my needs.” Although they belong to opposing political parties, Andrew and Monica both see the value in being politically aware as teenagers, and while they may not be able to vote yet, they will be well informed by the time they can. Monica voices [voiced], “I don't think it’s essential for students to align themselves to a party so early, but as the next generation of voters, we shouldn't simply fall in line with our parents' views. It's our obligation to get informed and form our own educated opinions on matters that will shape our future.”

    In addition to the students who are involved in politics on campus, there are others who participate in campaigns outside of school. Junior Ray Chao also started his political career during the 2008 elections when he began publicly displaying his support for Barack Obama. Now, as the Los Angeles Regional Director and Arcadia Chapter Coordinator of Gavin Newsom’s campaign for governor, Ray has demonstrated his efforts to make his voice heard. [awk reword] “Students for Gavin Newsom has [have?] built their organization upon the belief that students can significantly influence the outcome of any election,” he says [said]. While Newsom’s campaign has ended since, it is unlikely that Chao [Ray] will cease his participation in politics. “I hope to inspire the next generation of voters to start getting involved in the electoral process as early as possible.”

    Young Democrats meets every Monday at lunch in room J28 [J-28], and Young Republicans meets every Monday at lunch in J3 [J-3]. Whether you’re conservative or liberal, or just want to know what SNL’s political skits are about, get out there and let your voice be heard!

    alexethridge

    Posts : 33
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Apaches Get Political

    Post  alexethridge on Wed Nov 18, 2009 7:08 am

    648 words, goes democrats then republicans.

    Most students at Arcadia High School live in a self-imposed bubble that shields them from the happenings of the real world. Why should they care about Obama’s healthcare reform when they already have Color Guard rehearsal, Chemistry midterms, and baseball practice to deal with? Some students, however, are popping their bubbles by showing an interest in political events that concern the entire nation and taking action in organizations both on and off campus that make their voices heard.

    Meet junior Monica Ma, President of AHS’ Young Democrats. “As a club we attend various political lectures and volunteer for democratic organizations during election time,” says Monica about Young Democrats’ activities over the school year. “It’s a place where students interested in politics can discuss current issues that are happening outside of the school, share their opinion on government bills and laws, and overall serve as an outlet to voice personal thoughts that would seem out of place in normal lunch-time conversation.” While the Young Democrats may appear to be like the Young Republicans in both appearance and function, what really makes them unique are their distinctive beliefs. As Democrats, they believe all people should be able to pursue their goals despite their religion, race, ethnic background or sexual orientation. For example, I asked Monica, “What’s the Democratic opinion on the lack of interest today’s youth shows for political events?” Monica replied, “The route Americans take on things like global warming, Middle East policies and health care are decisions that will have a momentous impact and shape the world we are to inherit. Now is no time to be apathetic!” If you find yourself wanting to discuss civil rights’ movements, head on over to J-28 Mondays at lunch, where your opinion is certainly welcome.
    In addition to the students who get political on campus, there are others who participate outside of school. Junior Ray Chao is one of the few students who manages school, sports, and politics as a high school. He started his political career during the 2008 elections and now, after being the Los Angeles Regional Director and Arcadia Chapter Coordinator of Gavin Newsom’s campaign, Chao has already become emersed in the political world, a good experience for a high schooler to be proud of. “Students for Gavin Newsom has built their organization upon the belief that students can significantly influence the outcome of any election,” he says. While Newsom’s campaign has ended, it is unlikely that Ray Chao will cease his participation in politics. “I hope to inspire the next generation of voters to start getting involved in the electoral process as early as possible.”

    Senior Andrew Hong is President of the Young Republicans, the other dominating political club on campus. “The Young Republicans Club is a club where politically conservative students meet and talk about current issues,” says Andrew. “We also volunteer such as the Letters for the Troops event, and this year, we're hoping to bring in public speakers.” The Republican perspective believes that each person is responsible for their own place in society, and the government should enable each the ability to secure the benefits of society for themselves, their families and those who are unable to care for themselves. I asked Andrew the same question to get his Republican perspective, to which he replied, “It's normal for students to have a lack of interest on modern issues because modern issues aren't always relevant to us, especially living in the privileged neighborhood of Arcadia. Which would you rather read about: Rihanna getting decked in the face by Chris Brown or the ongoing debate regarding healthcare reform?” If you have a conventional opinion you want to share, stop by J-3 at lunch on Mondays for some good discussion and debate.
    Whether you’re conservative or liberal, or just want to know what SNL’s political skits are about, get out there and let your voice be heard!

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