The Pow Wow Forum

The Apache Pow Wow


    Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Share

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Post  raphaellu on Tue Dec 01, 2009 11:01 pm

    Raphael Lu
    World War II Exhibit (sorry no quotes yet)

    During World War II, on Mar. 27 to Oct. 27 1942, Japanese-Americans in the San Gabriel Valley were rounded up and housed at the Santa Anita Racetrack in fear of a second attack after Pearl Harbor. For these eight months, the Japanese were placed in camps like these around the nation.
    These Japanese Americans were given 48 hours and a list of what they could bring. While in these camps the Japanese were forced to live in crudely built shacks that still smelled of horse manure. Most of the men were able to keep their jobs as doctors, teachers, and cooks while the other people became vegetable growers, supplying food for the camp.
    Even though times were tough for the Japanese, some people were able to keep themselves amused. For example, a staff of writers formed one of the most famous historical newspapers, “The Pacemaker.” This paper included everyday tips and recreational events happening in the camp. Recreational and glee clubs were founded as well. By late October 1942 the Japanese camp was dispersed the inhabitants were allowed to return to there homes.
    59 years later, with the bitterness of the Japanese subsiding, on Mar. 15, 2001 a memorial marker was placed at the racetrack in commemoration of encampment of the approximately 20,000 Japanese- Americans. By placing this marker well can help the people of Arcadia remember the rich, but not always happy, history of Arcadia.
    To further help remember this past, from Nov. 7 to Jan 16, 2010, an exhibit showcasing events of the camp will be showed at the The Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum.

    The Racetrack: Full of History
    New Exhibit Opens

    Raphael Lu
    World War II Exhibit

    During World War II, on Mar. 27 to Oct. 27 1942, Japanese-Americans in the San Gabriel Valley were rounded up and housed at the Santa Anita Racetrack in fear of a second attack after Pearl Harbor. For these eight months, the Japanese were placed in camps like these around the nation.
    These Japanese Americans were given 48 hours and a list of what they could bring. While in these camps the Japanese were forced to live in crudely built shacks that still smelled of horse manure. Most of the men were able to keep their jobs as doctors, teachers, and cooks while the other people became vegetable growers, supplying food for the camp.
    Even though times were tough for the Japanese, some people were able to keep themselves amused. For example, a staff of writers formed one of the most famous historical newspapers, “The Pacemaker.” This paper included everyday tips and recreational events happening in the camp. Recreational and glee clubs were founded as well. By late October 1942 the Japanese camp was dispersed the inhabitants were allowed to return to there homes.
    59 years later, with the bitterness of the Japanese subsiding, on Mar. 15, 2001 a memorial marker was placed at the racetrack in commemoration of encampment of the approximately 20,000 Japanese- Americans. By placing this marker well can help the people of Arcadia remember the rich, but not always happy, history of Arcadia.
    To further help remember this past, from Nov. 7 to Jan 16, 2010, an exhibit showcasing events of the camp will be showed at the The Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum.

    The Racetrack: Full of History
    New Exhibit Opens

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Post  raphaellu on Sun Dec 06, 2009 6:04 pm

    Raphael Lu
    World War II Exhibit (sorry no quotes yet)

    During World War II, on Mar. 27 to Oct. 27 1942, Japanese-Americans in the San Gabriel Valley were rounded up and housed at the Santa Anita Racetrack, in fear of another uprising attack, from the Japanese of the West Coast, after the Pearl Harbor attack from the east. . For these eight months, the Japanese were placed in camps like these around the nation.
    These Japanese Americans were given 48 hours and a list of what they could bring. While in these camps, the Japanese were forced to live in crudely built shacks that still smelled of horse manure. Most of the men were able to keep their jobs as doctors, teachers, and cooks, while the others became vegetable growers, supplying food for the camp.
    Even though times were tough for the Japanese, some people were able to keep themselves amused. For example, a staff of writers formed one of the most famous historical newspapers, “The Pacemaker.” This paper included everyday tips and recreational events happening in the camp. Recreational and glee clubs were founded as well. Life was almost the same. The main downside to the encampment was the enclosure and the limitations. By late October 1942, when some of the war had settled, the Japanese camp was dispersed the inhabitants were allowed to return to there homes.
    59 years later, with the bitterness of the Japanese subsiding, on Mar. 15, 2001, a memorial marker was placed at the racetrack in commemoration of encampment of the approximately 20,000 Japanese-Americans By placing this marker, we can help the people of Arcadia remember the rich history of Arcadia.
    To further help remember this past, from Nov. 7 to Jan 16, 2010, an exhibit showcasing events of the camp will be showed at the The Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum. When LA Times asked the curator, Dana Dunn, of the museum why she said she said it was be cause she was “hoping that everyone will leave with a better understanding of our American past on this topic and that it will bring about some collective healing and cultural understanding.”

    The Racetrack: Full of History
    New Exhibit Opens

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Post  raphaellu on Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:25 pm

    Raphael Lu
    World War II Exhibit (sorry working on getting quotes right now)

    During World War II, on Mar. 27 to Oct. 27 1942, Japanese-Americans in the San Gabriel Valley were rounded up and housed at the Santa Anita Racetrack, in fear of another uprising attack, from the Japanese of the West Coast, after the Pearl Harbor attack from the east. For these eight months, the Japanese were placed in camps like these around the nation.
    Japanese-Americans U.S. citizens were given 48 hours and a list of what they could bring. While in these camps, the Japanese were forced to live in crudely built shacks that still smelled of horse manure. Most of the men were able to keep their jobs as doctors, teachers, and cooks, while the others became vegetable growers, supplying food for the camp.
    Even though times were tough, some people were able to keep themselves amused. For example, a staff of writers formed one of the most famous historical newspapers, “The Pacemaker.” This paper included everyday tips and recreational events happening in the camp. Recreational and glee clubs were founded as well. The main disadvantage to the encampment was the enclosure and the limitations. By late October 1942, when some of the war had settled, the Japanese camp was dispersed the inhabitants were allowed to return to there homes.
    59 years later, with the bitterness of the Japanese subsiding on Mar. 15, 2001, a memorial marker was placed at the racetrack in commemoration of encampment of the approximately 20,000 Japanese-Americans By placing this marker, we can help the people of Arcadia remember the rich history of Arcadia.
    To further help remember this past, from Nov. 7 to Jan 16, 2010, an exhibit showcasing events of the camp will be showed at the The Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum. When LA Times asked the curator, Dana Dunn, of the museum why she said she said it was be cause she was “hoping that everyone will leave with a better understanding of our American past on this topic and that it will bring about some collective healing and cultural understanding.”

    The Racetrack: Full of History
    New Exhibit Opens

    nancyxiao

    Posts : 170
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Post  nancyxiao on Mon Dec 07, 2009 9:37 pm

    Raphael Lu
    World War II Exhibit (sorry working on getting quotes right now)

    During World War II, on [which lasted from---this is if you want to put the date in, personally, i think it's unnecessary] Mar. 27 to Oct. 27 1942, Japanese-Americans in the San Gabriel Valley were rounded up and housed at the Santa Anita Racetrack, in fear of another uprising attack, [delete comma] from the Japanese of the West Coast, [delete comma] after the Pearl Harbor attack from the east [East]. For [During] these eight months, the Japanese were placed in camps like these [if your going to refer to "these," you should probably describe the camps] around the nation.
    Japanese-Americans [Japanese-American] U.S. citizens were given 48 hours and a list of what they could bring. [were given 48 hours to pack their belongings.] While in these camps, the Japanese were forced to live in crudely built shacks that still [delete] smelled of horse manure. Most of the men were able to keep their jobs as doctors, teachers, and cooks, while the [; but] others became [were forced to become] vegetable growers, supplying [to supply] food for the camp.
    Even though times were tough, some people were able to keep themselves amused. For example, a staff of writers formed one of the most famous historical newspapers, “The Pacemaker.” This paper included everyday tips and recreational events happening in the camp. Recreational and glee clubs [awkward] were founded as well. The main disadvantage to [of] the encampment [are you talking about one specific encampment? it seems to me like you're talking about all of them in general] was the enclosure and the limitations. By late October 1942, when some of the war had settled, [i don't understand what you're trying to say. are you trying to say that some countries had settled on peace treaties already? or that a good chunk of the wartime had passed?] the Japanese camp was dispersed [insert "and"] the inhabitants were allowed to return to there [their] homes.
    59 years later, with the bitterness of the Japanese subsiding on Mar. 15, 2001, a memorial marker was placed at the racetrack in commemoration of [insert "the"] encampment of the approximately 20,000 Japanese-Americans [insert period] By placing this marker, we can help the people of Arcadia remember the rich history of Arcadia [their city---"Arcadia" gets repetitive].
    To further help [awkward] remember this past, from Nov. 7 to Jan [insert period] 16, 2010, an exhibit showcasing events of the camp will be showed [shown] at the [delete] The Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum. When LA Times asked the curator, Dana Dunn, of the museum [the museum's curator, Dana Dunn,] why she said [insert quote (= LOL] she said it was be cause [because] she was “hoping that everyone will leave with a better understanding of our American past on this topic and that it will bring about some collective healing and cultural understanding.”

    The Racetrack: Full of History
    New Exhibit Opens

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Post  raphaellu on Tue Dec 08, 2009 12:30 pm

    Raphael Lu
    World War II Exhibit (gonna get more quotes)

    During World War II, from Mar. 27 to Oct. 27 1942, Japanese-Americans in the San Gabriel Valley were rounded up and housed at the Santa Anita Racetrack, in fear of another uprising attack from the Japanese of the West Coast after the Pearl Harbor attack on Hawaii. During these eight months, the Japanese were placed in camps around the nation.
    Japanese-American U.S. citizens were given 48 hours to pack there belongings with a list of what they could bring. While in these camps, the Japanese were forced to live in crudely built shacks that still smelled of horse manure. Most of the men were able to keep their jobs as doctors, teachers, and cooks, but the others were forced to become vegetable growers, to supply food for the camp.
    Even though times were tough, some people were able to keep themselves amused. For example, a staff of writers formed one of the most famous historical newspapers, “The Pacemaker.” This paper included everyday tips and recreational events happening in the camp. Recreational and glee clubs were founded as well. The main disadvantage of the encampments was the enclosure and the limitations. By late October 1942, when some of the some of the war had passed, the Japanese camp was dispersed and the inhabitants were allowed to return to their homes.
    59 years later, with the bitterness of the Japanese subsiding on Mar. 15, 2001, a memorial marker was placed at the racetrack in the commemoration of encampment of the approximately 20,000 Japanese-Americans. By placing this marker, we can help the people of Arcadia remember the rich history of Arcadia.
    To further remember this past, from Nov. 7 to Jan. 16, 2010, an exhibit showcasing events of the camp will be shown at The Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum. When LA Times asked the museum’s curator, Dana Dunn, of the museum why she said she said it was because she was “hoping that everyone will leave with a better understanding of our American past on this topic and that it will bring about some collective healing and cultural understanding.”

    The Racetrack: Full of History
    New Exhibit Opens

    nancyxiao

    Posts : 170
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Post  nancyxiao on Tue Dec 08, 2009 2:34 pm

    Raphael Lu
    World War II Exhibit (gonna get more quotes)

    During World War II, from Mar. 27 to Oct. 27 1942, Japanese-Americans [Japanese Americans] in the San Gabriel Valley were rounded up and housed at the Santa Anita Racetrack, in fear of another uprising attack from the Japanese of the West Coast after the Pearl Harbor attack on Hawaii. During these eight months, the Japanese were placed in camps around the nation.
    Japanese-American [Japanese American] U.S. citizens were given 48 hours to pack there [their]belongings with [according to] a list of what they could bring. While in these camps, the Japanese were forced to live in crudely built shacks that still [delete] smelled of horse manure. Most of the men were able to keep their jobs as doctors, teachers, and cooks, [semicolon] but the others were forced to become vegetable growers, [delete comma] to supply food for the camp.
    Even though times were tough, some people were able to keep themselves amused. For example, a staff of writers formed one of the most famous historical newspapers, “The Pacemaker.” This paper included [includes] everyday tips and recreational events happening in the camp. Recreational and glee clubs were founded as well. The main disadvantage of the encampments was the enclosure and the limitations. By late October [Oct.] 1942, when some of the [delete] some of the war had passed, the Japanese camp was dispersed and the inhabitants were allowed to return to their homes.
    59 years later, with the bitterness of the Japanese subsiding on Mar. 15, 2001, a memorial marker was placed at the racetrack in the commemoration of encampment of the approximately 20,000 Japanese-Americans. By placing this marker, we can help the people of Arcadia remember the rich history of Arcadia.
    To further remember this past, from Nov. 7 to Jan. 16, 2010, an exhibit showcasing events of the camp will be shown at The Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum. When LA Times asked the museum’s curator, Dana Dunn, of the museum why she said she said it was because she was “hoping that everyone will leave with a better understanding of our American past on this topic and that it will bring about some collective healing and cultural understanding.”

    The Racetrack: Full of History
    New Exhibit Opens.

    nancyxiao

    Posts : 170
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Post  nancyxiao on Tue Dec 08, 2009 2:47 pm

    Raphael Lu
    World War II Exhibit (gonna get more quotes)

    During World War II, from Mar. 27 to Oct. 27 1942, Japanese-Americans [Japanese Americans] in the San Gabriel Valley were rounded up and housed at the Santa Anita Racetrack, in fear of another uprising attack from the Japanese of the West Coast after the Pearl Harbor attack on Hawaii. During these eight months, the Japanese were placed in camps around the nation.
    Japanese-American [Japanese American] U.S. citizens were given 48 hours to pack there [their]belongings with [according to] a list of what they could bring. While in these camps, the Japanese were forced to live in crudely built shacks that still [delete] smelled of horse manure. Most of the men were able to keep their jobs as doctors, teachers, and cooks, [semicolon] but the others were forced to become vegetable growers, [delete comma] to supply food for the camp.
    Even though times were tough, some people were able to keep themselves amused. For example, a staff of writers formed one of the most famous historical newspapers, “The Pacemaker.” This paper included [includes] everyday tips and recreational events happening in the camp. Recreational and glee clubs were founded as well. The main disadvantage of the encampments was the enclosure and the limitations. By late October [Oct.] 1942, when some of the [delete] some of the war had passed, the Japanese camp was dispersed and the inhabitants were allowed to return to their homes.
    59 years later, with the bitterness of the Japanese subsiding on Mar. 15, 2001, a memorial marker was placed at the racetrack in the commemoration of encampment [commemoration of the encampment] of the [delete] approximately 20,000 Japanese-Americans. By placing this marker, we can help the people of Arcadia remember the rich history of Arcadia [their city].
    To further remember this past, from Nov. 7 to Jan. 16, 2010, an exhibit showcasing events of the camp will be shown at The Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum. When LA Times asked the museum’s curator, Dana Dunn, of the museum why she said she said [what is this?] it was because she was “hoping that everyone will leave with a better understanding of our American past on this topic and that it will bring about some collective healing and cultural understanding.”

    The Racetrack: Full of History
    New Exhibit Opens..

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Post  raphaellu on Wed Dec 09, 2009 12:21 am

    Raphael Lu
    World War II Exhibit

    During World War II, from Mar. 27 to Oct. 27 1942, Japanese Americans in the San Gabriel Valley were rounded up and housed at the Santa Anita Racetrack, in fear of another uprising attack from the Japanese of the West Coast after the Pearl Harbor attack on Hawaii. During these eight months, the Japanese were placed in camps around the nation.
    Japanese American U.S. citizens were given 48 hours to pack their belongings according to a list of what they could bring. While in these camps, the Japanese were forced to live in crudely built shacks that still smelled of horse manure. Most of the men were able to keep their jobs as doctors, teachers, and cooks; but the others were forced to become vegetable growers to supply food for the camp. Senior Andy Liang believes that the

    Even though times were tough, some people were able to keep themselves amused. For example, a staff of writers formed one of the most famous historical newspapers, “The Pacemaker.” This paper includes everyday tips and recreational events happening in the camp. Recreational and glee clubs were founded as well. The main disadvantage of the encampments was the enclosure and the limitations. By late Oct. 1942, some of the war had passed, the Japanese camp was dispersed and the inhabitants were allowed to return to their homes.
    59 years later, with the bitterness of the Japanese subsiding on Mar. 15, 2001, a memorial marker was placed at the racetrack in commemoration of the encampment of approximately 20,000 Japanese-Americans. By placing this marker, we can help the people of Arcadia remember the rich history of their city.
    To further remember this past, from Nov. 7 to Jan. 16, 2010, an exhibit showcasing events of the camp will be shown at The Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum. When LA Times asked the museum’s curator, Dana Dunn, of the exhibit was made, she said it was because she was “hoping that everyone will leave with a better understanding of our American past on this topic and that it will bring about some collective healing and cultural understanding.”

    The Racetrack: Full of History
    New Exhibit Open

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    aye ya

    Post  raphaellu on Wed Dec 09, 2009 12:23 am

    sorry disregard the last post

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Post  raphaellu on Wed Dec 09, 2009 12:26 am

    Raphael Lu
    World War II Exhibit

    During World War II, from Mar. 27 to Oct. 27 1942, Japanese Americans in the San Gabriel Valley were rounded up and housed at the Santa Anita Racetrack, in fear of another uprising attack from the Japanese of the West Coast after the Pearl Harbor attack on Hawaii. During these eight months, the Japanese were placed in camps around the nation.
    Japanese American U.S. citizens were given 48 hours to pack their belongings according to a list of what they could bring. While in these camps, the Japanese were forced to live in crudely built shacks that still smelled of horse manure. Most of the men were able to keep their jobs as doctors, teachers, and cooks; but the others were forced to become vegetable growers to supply food for the camp.
    Even though times were tough, some people were able to keep themselves amused. For example, a staff of writers formed one of the most famous historical newspapers, “The Pacemaker.” This paper includes everyday tips and recreational events happening in the camp. Recreational and glee clubs were founded as well. The main disadvantage of the encampments was the enclosure and the limitations. By late Oct. 1942, some of the war had passed, the Japanese camp was dispersed and the inhabitants were allowed to return to their homes.
    59 years later, with the bitterness of the Japanese subsiding on Mar. 15, 2001, a memorial marker was placed at the racetrack in commemoration of the encampment of approximately 20,000 Japanese-Americans. By placing this marker, we can help the people of Arcadia remember the rich history of their city.
    To further remember this past, from Nov. 7 to Jan. 16, 2010, an exhibit showcasing events of the camp will be shown at The Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum. When LA Times asked the museum’s curator, Dana Dunn, of the exhibit was made, she said it was because she was “hoping that everyone will leave with a better understanding of our American past on this topic and that it will bring about some collective healing and cultural understanding.”

    The Racetrack: Full of History
    New Exhibit Open

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Post  raphaellu on Wed Dec 09, 2009 12:52 am

    Raphael Lu
    World War II Exhibit (YAY I HAVE QUOTES NOW)

    During World War II, from Mar. 27 to Oct. 27 1942, Japanese Americans in the San Gabriel Valley were rounded up and housed at the Santa Anita Racetrack, in fear of another uprising attack from the Japanese of the West Coast after the Pearl Harbor attack on Hawaii. During these eight months, the Japanese were placed in camps around the nation. One person disagreeing with this decision is Senior Andrew Taylor. He believes that the “government acted emotionally to the Pearl Harbor attack [and] needed to show strength. The Japanese were the perfect scapegoats.”
    Japanese American U.S. citizens were given 48 hours to pack their belongings according to a list of what they could bring. While in these camps, the Japanese were forced to live in crudely built shacks that smelled of horse manure. Most of the men were able to keep their jobs as doctors, teachers, and cooks; but the others were forced to become vegetable growers to supply food for the camp.
    These camps were a place for the American government to keep a close eye on the Japanese. Senior student Andy Liang explains that, contrary to popular belief, “they were generally okay and defiantly not like the German concentration camps.”
    Even though times were tough, some people were able to keep themselves amused. For example, a staff of writers formed one of the most famous historical newspapers, “The Pacemaker.” This paper includes everyday tips and recreational events happening in the camp. Recreational and glee clubs were founded as well. The main disadvantage of the encampments, however, was the enclosure and the limitations. By late Oct. 1942, some of the war had passed, the Japanese camp was dispersed and the inhabitants were allowed to return to their homes.
    59 years later, with the bitterness of the Japanese subsiding, on Mar. 15, 2001, a memorial marker was placed at the racetrack in commemoration of the encampment of approximately 20,000 Japanese-Americans. By placing this marker, we can help the people of Arcadia remember the rich history of their city.
    To further remember this past, from Nov. 7 to Jan. 16, 2010, an exhibit showcasing events of the camp will be shown at The Ruth and Charles Gilb Arcadia Historical Museum. When LA Times asked the museum’s curator, Dana Dunn, of the exhibit was made, she said it was because she was “hoping that everyone will leave with a better understanding of our American past on this topic and that it will bring about some collective healing and cultural understanding.”

    The Racetrack: Full of History
    New Exhibit Open

    Sponsored content

    Re: Japanese WWII Exhibit

    Post  Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Tue Nov 21, 2017 4:59 pm