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    Frightening Facts about your Feast

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    Joanna Shen

    Posts : 87
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Frightening Facts about your Feast

    Post  Joanna Shen on Wed Dec 02, 2009 12:08 am

    Radio stations are shifting from mainstream music to festive jingles, red blowout sales are dangling invitingly in every store, and even though you’re in California, the seasons are finally changing. As winter break draws closer and you are ready for that second round of feasts, it’s difficult not to wolf down the endless plates of tasty treats. But, before you loosen up your belt a notch, be sure you know what food combinations would be damaging if fed to your stomach.

    The Appetizer: With a hearty entrée sizzling delightfully on the stove top on the way, what better way to start off the feast than with a light, crisp salad right? Wrong. For those who go the extra mile and layer parmesan cheese and pine nuts on their salad, the combination could be disastrous. Nuts and cheeses are both considered concentrated proteins and are not uniform in composition. When combined, not only is proper digestion difficult, the gastric acidity imbalance causes upset stomachs. Rule to be learned: Do not consume two concentrated proteins of varying compositions in the same meal.
    The Entrée: Casserole dishes, a roasted chicken, and a hearty pot of cream of mushroom soup arrive at a table surrounded by drooling mouths. A feast fit for a king? Think again. Chances are, both the casserole dishes and the soup contain hefty amounts of milk. Milk is considered a cooling protein whereas meats are heating proteins. If milk and meats, like the chicken, are eaten together, your stomach will produce harmful toxins that slow down digestion to an extent where food will remain in the stomach for 7-8 hours. Rule to be learned: Do not eat meat proteins and milk proteins together.
    The Dessert: With empty plates and satisfied stomachs, the meal will only be complete with a banana split. What could go wrong with fruit and ice cream? More than you know. Whether your dessert platter consists of ice cream or frozen yogurt, avoid drizzling condensed milk or milk at all on your food under any circumstances. Eating bananas with milk produces toxins that trigger sinus congestions, allergies and even colds. Melons should be picked out of your fruit cup and eaten separately as well. Melons are 90% water, and if fermented by other foods, will stay inside your digestive system longer than necessary. Rule to be learned: Avoid taking milk with fresh fruits and eat melon only by itself.
    The Nighttime Tea: As you gather around the warm fireplace and exchange words of gratitude and past memories, it is only suitable to have a warm cup of tea or coffee to accompany your cold hands. Think again if you decide to reach for that bottle of honey to drizzle in your tea. Once the honey reaches your piping hot drink, it will begin to cook. Cooked honey molecules become non-homogenized glue that relentlessly stick on mucous membranes and clogs channels. Uncooked honey is sweet nectar. Cooked honey is poison. Rule to be learned: Choose your sweetener wisely.
    With two weeks of freedom to eat as you please, be careful as to what you gobble down. But, remember to hit the treadmill every once in a while to stay fit. Enjoy the winter season and happy holidays!

    Joanna Shen

    Posts : 87
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Frightening Facts about your Feast

    Post  Joanna Shen on Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:45 pm

    Radio stations are shifting from mainstream music to festive jingles, red blowout sales are dangling invitingly in every store, and even though you’re in California, the seasons are finally changing. As winter break draws closer and you have practiced eating tactics to ready yourself for that second round of feasts, it’s difficult not to wolf down the endless plates of tasty treats. But, before you loosen up your belt a notch, be sure you know what food combinations to watch out for that might give you unwanted presents this holiday season.
    The Appetizer: With a hearty entrée sizzling delightfully on the stove top on the way, what better way to start off the feast than with a light, crisp salad, right? Wrong. For those who go the extra mile and layer parmesan cheese and pine nuts on their salad, the combination could be disastrous. Nuts and cheeses are both considered concentrated proteins and are not uniform in composition. When combined, not only is proper digestion difficult, but the gastric acidity imbalance also causes upset stomachs. Rule to be learned: Do not consume two concentrated proteins of varying compositions in the same meal.
    The Entrée: Casserole dishes, a roasted chicken, and a hearty pot of cream of mushroom soup arrive at a table surrounded by drooling mouths. A feast fit for a king? Think again. Chances are, both the casserole dishes and the soup contain hefty amounts of milk. Milk is considered a cooling protein whereas meats are considered heating proteins. If milk and meats, like the chicken, are eaten together, your stomach will produce harmful toxins that slow down digestion to an extent in which food will remain in the stomach for 7-8 hours. Rule to be learned: Do not eat food with meat proteins and milk proteins together.
    The Dessert: With empty plates and satisfied stomachs, the meal will only be complete with a banana split. What could go wrong with fruit and ice cream? More than you know. Whether your dessert platter consists of ice cream or frozen yogurt, avoid drizzling condensed milk or milk at all on your food under any circumstances. Eating bananas with milk produces toxins that trigger sinus congestions, allergies, and even colds. Melons should be picked out of your fruit cup and eaten separately as well. Melons are 90% water and, if fermented by other foods inside the stomach, will stay inside your digestive system longer than necessary. Rule to be learned: Avoid taking milk with fresh fruits and only eat melon by itself.
    The Nighttime Tea: As you gather around the warm fireplace and exchange words of gratitude and past memories, it is only suitable to have a warm cup of tea or coffee to accompany your cold hands. What harm can a warm drink do? Think again if you decide to reach for that bottle of honey to drizzle into your tea. Once the honey reaches your piping hot drink, it will begin to cook. Cooked honey molecules become non-homogenized glue that relentlessly sticks on mucous membranes and clogs channels. Uncooked honey is sweet nectar. Cooked honey is poison. Rule to be learned: Choose your sweetener wisely.
    With two weeks of freedom to eat as you please, be careful as to what you gobble down. A small helping of avocados to accompany any meal will help ease digestion. Now that you’re a bit smarter about food, you can satisfy your cravings more healthfully. Enjoy the winter season and happy holidays!

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Frightening Facts about your Feast

    Post  ashleychi on Sun Dec 06, 2009 9:40 pm

    EDIT 1

    Radio stations are shifting from mainstream music to festive jingles, red blowout sales [or 'sales signs'?] are dangling invitingly in every store, and even though you’re in California, the seasons are finally changing. As winter break draws closer and you have practiced eating tactics to ready yourself for that second round of feasts [reword], it’s difficult not to wolf down the endless plates of tasty treats. But, [delete] before you loosen up your belt a notch, be sure you know what food combinations to watch out for that might give you unwanted presents this holiday season.
    The Appetizer: With a hearty entrée sizzling delightfully on the stove top on the way, what better way to start off the feast than with a light, crisp salad, right? Wrong. For those who go the extra mile and layer parmesan cheese and pine nuts on their salad, the combination could be disastrous. Nuts and cheeses are both considered concentrated proteins and are not uniform in composition. When combined, not only is proper digestion difficult, but the gastric acidity imbalance also causes upset stomachs. Rule to be learned: Do not consume two concentrated proteins of varying compositions in the same meal.
    The Entrée: Casserole dishes, a roasted chicken, and a hearty pot of cream of mushroom soup arrive at a table surrounded by drooling mouths. A feast fit for a king? Think again. Chances are, both the casserole dishes and the soup contain hefty amounts of milk. Milk is considered a cooling protein [insert comma] whereas meats are considered heating proteins. If milk and meats, like the chicken, are eaten together, your stomach will produce harmful toxins that slow down digestion to an extent in which food will remain in the stomach for 7-8 hours. Rule to be learned: Do not eat food with meat proteins and milk proteins together.
    The Dessert: With empty plates and satisfied stomachs, the meal will only be complete with a banana split. What could go wrong with fruit and ice cream? More than you know. Whether your dessert platter consists of ice cream or frozen yogurt, avoid drizzling condensed milk or milk at all on your food under any circumstances. Eating bananas with milk produces toxins that trigger sinus congestions, allergies, and even colds. Melons should be picked out of your fruit cup and eaten separately as well. Melons are 90% water and, if fermented by other foods inside the stomach, will stay inside your digestive system longer than necessary. Rule to be learned: Avoid taking milk with fresh fruits and only eat melon by itself.
    The Nighttime Tea: As you gather around the warm fireplace and exchange words of gratitude and past memories, it is only suitable to have a warm cup of tea or coffee to accompany your cold hands. What harm can a warm drink do? Think again if you decide to reach for that bottle of honey to drizzle into your tea. Once the honey reaches your piping hot drink, it will begin to cook. Cooked honey molecules become non-homogenized glue that relentlessly sticks on mucous membranes and clogs channels. Uncooked honey is sweet nectar. Cooked honey is poison. Rule to be learned: Choose your sweetener wisely.
    With two weeks of freedom to eat as you please, be careful as to what you gobble down. A small helping of avocados to accompany any meal will help ease digestion. Now that you’re a bit smarter about food, you can satisfy your cravings more healthfully. Enjoy the winter season and happy holidays!

    Joanna Shen

    Posts : 87
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Frightening Facts about your Feast

    Post  Joanna Shen on Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:28 am

    Radio stations are shifting from mainstream music to festive jingles, red blowout sale signs are dangling invitingly in every store, and even though you’re in California, the seasons are finally changing. As winter break draws closer and you are readying yourself for that second round of feasts, it’s difficult not to wolf down the endless plates of tasty treats. But before you loosen up your belt a notch, be sure you know what food combinations to watch out for that might give you unwanted presents this holiday season.
    The Appetizer: With a hearty entrée sizzling delightfully on the stove top on the way, what better way to start off the feast than with a light, crisp salad, right? Wrong. For those who go the extra mile and layer Parmesan cheese and pine nuts on their salad, the combination could be disastrous. Nuts and cheeses are both considered concentrated proteins and are not uniform in composition. When combined, not only is proper digestion difficult, but the gastric acidity imbalance also causes upset stomachs. Rule to be learned: Do not consume two concentrated proteins of varying compositions in the same meal.
    The Entrée: Casserole dishes, a roasted chicken, and a hearty pot of cream of mushroom soup arrive at a table surrounded by drooling mouths. A feast fit for a king? Think again. Chances are, both the casserole dishes and the soup contain hefty amounts of milk. Milk is considered a cooling protein, whereas meats are considered heating proteins. If milk and meats, like the chicken, are eaten together, your stomach will produce harmful toxins that slow down digestion to an extent in which food will remain in the stomach for 7-8 hours. Rule to be learned: Do not eat food with meat proteins and milk proteins together.
    The Dessert: With empty plates and satisfied stomachs, the meal will only be complete with a banana split. What could go wrong with fruit and ice cream? More than you know. Whether your dessert platter consists of ice cream or frozen yogurt, avoid drizzling condensed milk or milk at all on your food under any circumstances. Eating bananas with milk produces toxins that trigger sinus congestions, allergies, and even colds. Melons should be picked out of your fruit cup and eaten separately as well. Melons are 90% water and, if fermented by other foods inside the stomach, will stay inside your digestive system longer than necessary. Rule to be learned: Avoid taking milk with fresh fruits and only eat melon by itself.
    The Nighttime Tea: As you gather around the warm fireplace and exchange words of gratitude and past memories, it is only suitable to have a warm cup of tea or coffee to accompany your cold hands. What harm can a warm drink do? Think again if you decide to reach for that bottle of honey to drizzle into your tea. Once the honey reaches your piping hot drink, it will begin to cook. Cooked honey molecules become non-homogenized glue that relentlessly sticks on mucous membranes and clogs channels. Uncooked honey is sweet nectar. Cooked honey is poison. Rule to be learned: Choose your sweetener wisely.
    With two weeks of freedom to eat as you please, be careful as to what you gobble down. A small helping of avocados to accompany any meal will help ease digestion. Now that you’re a bit smarter about food, you can satisfy your cravings more healthfully. Enjoy the winter season and happy holidays!

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Frightening Facts about your Feast

    Post  ashleychi on Mon Dec 07, 2009 6:02 pm

    EDIT 2

    Radio stations are shifting [insert 'their playlists'] from mainstream music to festive jingles, red blowout sale signs are dangling invitingly in every store, and even though you’re in California, the seasons are finally changing. As winter break draws closer and you are readying yourself for that second round of feasts [reword, doesn't flow], it’s difficult not to wolf down the endless plates of tasty treats. But before you loosen up your belt a notch, be sure you know what food combinations to watch out for that might give you unwanted presents this holiday season.
    The Appetizer: With a hearty entrée sizzling delightfully on the stove top on the way, what better way to start off the feast than with a light, crisp salad, right? Wrong. For those who go the extra mile and layer Parmesan cheese and pine nuts on their salad, the combination could be disastrous. Nuts and cheeses are both considered concentrated proteins and are not uniform in composition. When combined, not only is proper digestion difficult, but the gastric acidity imbalance also causes upset stomachs. Rule to be learned: Do not consume two concentrated proteins of varying compositions in the same meal.
    The Entrée: Casserole dishes, a roasted chicken, and a hearty pot of cream of mushroom soup arrive at a table surrounded by drooling mouths. A feast fit for a king? Think again. Chances are, both the casserole dishes and the soup contain hefty amounts of milk. Milk is considered a cooling protein, whereas meats are considered heating proteins. If milk and meats, like the chicken, are eaten together, your stomach will produce harmful toxins that slow down digestion to an extent in which food will remain in the stomach for 7-8 hours. Rule to be learned: Do not eat food with meat proteins and milk proteins together.
    The Dessert: With empty plates and satisfied stomachs, the meal will only be complete with a banana split. What could go wrong with fruit and ice cream? More than you know. Whether your dessert platter consists of ice cream or frozen yogurt, avoid drizzling condensed milk or milk at all on your food under any circumstances. Eating bananas with milk produces toxins that trigger sinus congestions, allergies, and even colds. Melons should be picked out of your fruit cup and eaten separately as well. Melons are 90% water and, if fermented by other foods inside the stomach, will stay inside your digestive system longer than necessary. Rule to be learned: Avoid taking [replace with 'eating'] milk with fresh fruits and only eat melon by itself.
    The Nighttime Tea: As you [you and your loved ones] gather around the warm fireplace and exchange words of gratitude and past memories, it is only suitable to have a warm cup of tea or coffee to accompany your cold hands. What harm can a warm drink do? Think again if you decide to reach for that bottle of honey to drizzle into your tea. Once the honey reaches your piping hot drink, it will begin to cook. Cooked honey molecules become non-homogenized glue that relentlessly sticks on mucous membranes and clogs channels. Uncooked honey is sweet nectar. Cooked honey is poison. Rule to be learned: Choose your sweetener wisely.
    With two weeks of freedom to eat as you please, be careful as to what you gobble down. A small helping of avocados to accompany any meal will help ease digestion. Now that you’re a bit smarter about food, you can satisfy your cravings more healthfully [healthily]. Enjoy the winter season and happy holidays!

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