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    Marching Band and Color guard

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    katherinebay

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    Marching Band and Color guard Empty Marching Band and Color guard

    Post  katherinebay on Wed Sep 09, 2009 12:15 am

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. When thinking of a marching band, one would assume that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints go Marching In." The respective team or group would perform to their respective area. However, the football field isn't only used for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting a choreographed performance by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and Color guard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and visuals shown by the Color guard's different types of equipment.

    On an annual basis, the theme of a spectacular show such as this varies. For instance, this season's theme revolves around the Egypt. The music, which is composed by Sam Cardon and is and transcribed. adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne, resembles Persian and Egyptian music as well. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes this as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the Band, Percussion, and Color guard also manages to present all of this while marching. So far, their drill has led them to make many Egyptian-themed shapes, like eyes and pyramids.

    Color guard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystical with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs, or back bends, as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning a usual flag with a colorful silk attached, they perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Halftime during any varsity football home game is when the Band, Percussion, and Color guard unleashes their intriguing field show.
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    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty EDIT 1

    Post  ashleychi on Sat Sep 12, 2009 5:16 pm

    EDIT 1

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. When thinking of a marching band, one would assume that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints go Marching In." The respective team or group would perform to their respective area. However, the football field isn't only used for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting a choreographed performance by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and Color guard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and visuals shown by the Color guard's different types of equipment. [change to...'and different types of equipment Color guard integrates into their routine.']

    On an annual basis, the theme of a spectacular show such as this varies. [change to... 'The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year.'] For instance, this season's theme revolves around the [delete] Egypt. The music, which is composed by Sam Cardon and is and transcribed. adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne, [< awk.] resembles Persian and Egyptian music as well [delete]. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes this [change to 'the music'] as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the Band, Percussion, and Color guard also [delete] manages to present all of this while marching. So far, their [whose? Color guard or band's?] drill has led them to make many Egyptian-themed shapes, like eyes and pyramids.

    Color guard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystical [change to 'mystically'] with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs, or back bends, as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning a [change to 'the'] usual flag with a colorful silk attached, they perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Halftime during any varsity football home game is when the Band, Percussion, and Color guard unleashes [unleash] their intriguing field show.
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    katherinebay

    Posts : 123
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty Re: Marching Band and Color guard

    Post  katherinebay on Sun Sep 13, 2009 10:32 am

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. When thinking of a marching band, one would assume that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints go Marching In." The respective team or group would perform to their respective area. However, the football field isn't only used for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting a choreographed performance by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and Color guard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment Color guard integrates into their routine.

    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season's theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and is transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne and resembles Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes this the music as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the Band, Percussion, and Color guard manages to present all of this while marching. So far, the Color guard, Band, and Percussion's drill has led them to make many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids.

    Color guard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs, or back bends, as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, they perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Halftime during any varsity football home game is when the Band, Percussion, and Color guard unleash their intriguing field show.
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    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty EDIT 2

    Post  ashleychi on Sun Sep 13, 2009 12:53 pm

    EDIT 2

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. When thinking of a marching band, one would assume that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints go Marching In." The respective team or group would perform to their respective area. [this is ok, but doesn't really flow that well. try rewording it.] However, the football field isn't only used [used solely] for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting a choreographed performance by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and Color guard [color guard]. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment Color guard [color guard] integrates into their routine.

    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season's theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and is transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne and resembles Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes this the music as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the Band, Percussion, and Color guard manages to present all of this while marching. So far, the Color guard [color guard], Band [band], and Percussion's [percussion's] drill has led them to make [change to 'create'] many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids.

    Color guard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs, or back bends, [change to 'such as walk overs and back bends'] as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, they perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Halftime during any varsity football home game is when the Band, Percussion, and Color guard [band, percussion, and color guard] unleash their intriguing field show.
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    katherinebay

    Posts : 123
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty Re: Marching Band and Color guard

    Post  katherinebay on Mon Sep 14, 2009 10:14 am

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. Similarly, when thinking of a marching band, a common supposition would be that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints go Marching In." One would assume that the respective team or group would perform to their respective area.
    However, the football field isn't used solely for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting a choreographed performance by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and color guard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment color guard integrates into their routine.

    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season's theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and is transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne and resembles Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes the music as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the Band, Percussion, and Color guard manages to present all of this while marching. So far, the color guard, band, and percussion's drill has led them to create many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids.

    Color guard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs and back bends as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, they perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Halftime during any varsity football home game and their numerous competitions are when the band, percussion, and color guard unleash their intriguing field show.
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    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty EDIT 3

    Post  ashleychi on Mon Sep 14, 2009 5:06 pm

    EDIT 3

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. Similarly, when thinking of a marching band, a common supposition would be that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints go Marching In." One would assume that the respective team or group would perform to their respective area.

    However, the football field isn't used solely for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting a [delete] choreographed performance [performances] by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and color guard [colorguard- it's one word, I just found out]. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment color guard [colorguard] integrates into their routine.

    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season's theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and is transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne and resembles Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes the music as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the Band [lowercase], Percussion [lowercase], and Color guard [colorguard] manages to present all of this while marching. So far, the color guard [colorguard], band, and percussion's drill has led them to create many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids.

    Color guard [Colorguard] is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs and back bends [insert comma] as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, they [replace with 'colorguard members'] perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Halftime during any varsity football home game and their numerous competitions are when the band, percussion, and color guard [colorguard] unleash their intriguing field show.
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    katherinebay

    Posts : 123
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty Re: Marching Band and Color guard

    Post  katherinebay on Tue Sep 15, 2009 10:21 am

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. Similarly, when thinking of a marching band, a common supposition would be that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints go Marching In." One would assume that the respective team or group would perform to their respective area.

    However, the football field isn't used solely for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting choreographed performances by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and colorguard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment colorguard integrates into their routine.

    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season's theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and is transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne and resembles Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes the music as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the band, percussion, and colorguard manages to present all of this while marching. So far, the colorguard, band, and percussion's drill has led them to create many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids.

    Colorguard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs and back bends, as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, colorguard members perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Halftime during any varsity football home game and their numerous competitions are when the band, percussion, and colorguard unleash their intriguing field show.
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    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty EDIT 4

    Post  ashleychi on Tue Sep 15, 2009 9:47 pm

    EDIT 4

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. Similarly, when thinking of a marching band, a common supposition would be that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints go [capitalize] Marching In." One would assume that the respective team or group would perform to [replace with 'at' or 'in'] their respective area.

    However, the football field isn't used solely for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting choreographed performances by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and colorguard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment colorguard integrates into their routine.

    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season's theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and is transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne and resembles Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes the music as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the band, percussion, and colorguard manages [manage] to present all of this while marching. So far, the colorguard, band, and percussion's drill has led them to create many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids.

    Colorguard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs and back bends, as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, colorguard members perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Halftime during any varsity football home game and their numerous competitions are when the band, percussion, and colorguard unleash their intriguing field show.
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    katherinebay

    Posts : 123
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty Re: Marching Band and Color guard

    Post  katherinebay on Wed Sep 16, 2009 11:42 pm

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. Similarly, when thinking of a marching band, a common supposition would be that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints Go Marching In." One would assume that the respective team or group would perform in their respective area.

    However, the football field isn't used solely for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting choreographed performances by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and colorguard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment colorguard integrates into their routine. Halftime during any varsity football home game and their numerous competitions are when the band, percussion, and colorguard unleash their intriguing field show.

    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season's theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and is transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne and resembles Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes the music as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the band, percussion, and colorguard manage to present all of this while marching. So far, the colorguard, band, and percussion's drill has led them to create many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids. As for second song, the band’s music turns into a much slower-paced song filled with body movements from the band. Such coordination blends in perfectly with their tunes.

    Colorguard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs and back bends, as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, colorguard members perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Impressive saber work is also displayed and the team performs such difficult routines, making it look simply incredulous. For the freshmen on the team still trying to get use to such heart-pumping work, some such as freshman Anna Miyajima find it “hard learning new work, but really cool to be part of such an amazing show.”

    Of course, no one can visualize a performance such as this through just reading an article, no matter how descriptive it may be. With that said, to watch such speculation in the making isn’t just any ordinary show, it is a journey that takes the audience through Egypt with twists and turns all around. Although the band, colorguard, and percussion aren’t quite finished choreographing the entire show, this would give one an even more reason to come and support the band, percussion, and colorguard.
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    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty EDIT 5

    Post  ashleychi on Sat Sep 19, 2009 8:45 pm

    EDIT 5

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. Similarly, when thinking of a marching band, a common supposition would be that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints Go Marching In." One would assume that the respective team or group would perform in their respective area.

    However, the football field isn't used solely for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting choreographed performances by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and colorguard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment colorguard integrates into their routine. Halftime during any varsity football home game and their numerous competitions are when the band, percussion, and colorguard unleash their intriguing field show.

    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season's theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and is transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne and resembles Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes the music as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the band, percussion, and colorguard manage to present all of this while marching. So far, the colorguard, band, and percussion's drill has led them to create many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids. As for second song [change to 'another, slow-paced song'] ,the band’s music turns into a much slower-paced song filled with body movements from the band [awk, reword]. Such coordination blends in perfectly with their tunes.

    Colorguard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs and back bends, as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, colorguard members perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Impressive saber work is also displayed and the team performs such [delete] difficult routines, making it look simply incredulous. For the freshmen on the team still trying to get use [used] to such heart-pumping work, some [insert comma] such as [change to 'like'] freshman Anna Miyajima [insert comma] find it “hard learning new work, but really cool to be part of such an amazing show.”

    Of course, no one can visualize a performance such as this through just reading an article [change to 'no one can visualize such a performance just by reading an article] , no matter how descriptive it may be. With that said, to watch such speculation [word choice] in the making isn’t just any ordinary show, it is a journey that takes the audience through Egypt with twists and turns all around. Although the band, colorguard, and percussion aren’t quite finished choreographing the entire show, this would give one an even more reason to come and support the band, percussion, and colorguard. [awk, reword]
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    katherinebay

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    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty Re: Marching Band and Color guard

    Post  katherinebay on Sat Sep 19, 2009 9:48 pm

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. Similarly, when thinking of a marching band, a common supposition would be that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints Go Marching In." One would assume that the respective team or group would perform in their respective area.

    However, the football field isn't used solely for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting choreographed performances by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and colorguard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment colorguard integrates into their routine. Halftime during any varsity football home game and their numerous competitions are when the band, percussion, and colorguard unleash their intriguing field show.

    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season's theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and is transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne and resembles Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes the music as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the band, percussion, and colorguard manage to present all of this while marching. So far, the colorguard, band, and percussion's drill has led them to create many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids. As for another, slow-paced song, the music turns into a ballad filled with body movements from the band and percussion. Such coordination blends in perfectly with their tunes.

    Colorguard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs and back bends, as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, colorguard members perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Impressive saber work is also displayed and the team performs difficult routines, making it look simply incredulous. For the freshmen on the team still trying to get used to such heart-pumping work, some, like freshman Anna Miyajima, find it “hard learning new work, but really cool to be part of such an amazing show.”

    Of course, no one can visualize such a performance just by reading an article, no matter how descriptive it may be. With that said, to observe such fantasia in the making isn’t just any ordinary show, it is a journey that takes the audience through Egypt with twists and turns all around. Although the band, colorguard, and percussion aren’t quite finished choreographing the entire show, this would give one an even bigger reason to come and watch them at each and every home football game. Such dedication from them is so unique and pure that that alone is already an immense accomplishment.
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    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty EDIT 6

    Post  ashleychi on Mon Sep 21, 2009 8:02 pm

    EDIT 6

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. Similarly, when thinking of a marching band, a common supposition would be that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints Go Marching In." One would assume that the respective team or group would perform in their respective area.

    However, the football field isn't used solely for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting choreographed performances by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and colorguard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment colorguard integrates into their routine. Halftime during any varsity football home game and their numerous competitions are when the band, percussion, and colorguard unleash their intriguing field show.

    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season's theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and is transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne and resembles Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes the music as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the band, percussion, and colorguard manage to present all of this while marching. So far, the colorguard, band, and percussion's drill has led them to create many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids. As for another, slow-paced song, the music turns into a ballad filled with body movements from the band and percussion. Such coordination blends in perfectly with their tunes [replace with 'the pace of their music].

    Colorguard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs and back bends, as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, colorguard members perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Impressive saber work is also displayed and the team performs difficult routines, making it look simply incredulous. For the freshmen on the team still trying to get used to such heart-pumping work, some, like freshman Anna Miyajima, find it “hard learning new work, but really cool to be part of such an amazing show.”

    Of course, no one can visualize such a performance just by reading an article, no matter how descriptive it may be. With that said, to observe such fantasia in the making isn’t just any ordinary show, it is a journey that takes the audience through Egypt with twists and turns all around. Although the band, colorguard, and percussion aren’t quite finished choreographing the entire show, this would give one an even bigger reason to come and watch them at each and every home football game. Such dedication from them is so unique and pure that that alone is already an immense accomplishment.
    avatar
    katherinebay

    Posts : 123
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty Re: Marching Band and Color guard

    Post  katherinebay on Tue Sep 22, 2009 8:18 pm

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. Similarly, when thinking of a marching band, a common supposition would be that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of "When the Saints Go Marching In." One would assume that the respective team or group would perform in their respective area.

    However, the football field isn't used solely for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but for presenting choreographed performances by the Apache Marching Band, varsity Percussion, and colorguard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment colorguard integrates into their routine. Halftime during any varsity football home game and their numerous competitions are when the band, percussion, and colorguard unleash their intriguing field show.

    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season's theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and is transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne and resembles Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes the music as "very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others." While embellishing such intricate music, the band, percussion, and colorguard manage to present all of this while marching. So far, the colorguard, band, and percussion's drill has led them to create many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids. As for another, slow-paced song, the music turns into a ballad filled with body movements from the band and percussion. Such coordination blends in perfectly with the pace of their music.

    Colorguard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs and back bends, as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, colorguard members perform with only a single 7-foot pole, which leaves the audience asking for more. Impressive saber work is also displayed and the team performs difficult routines, making it look simply incredulous. For the freshmen on the team still trying to get used to such heart-pumping work, some, like freshman Anna Miyajima, find it “hard learning new work, but really cool to be part of such an amazing show.”

    Of course, no one can visualize such a performance just by reading an article, no matter how descriptive it may be. With that said, to observe such fantasia in the making isn’t just any ordinary show, it is a journey that takes the audience through Egypt with twists and turns all around. Although the band, colorguard, and percussion aren’t quite finished choreographing the entire show, this would give one an even bigger reason to come and watch them at each and every home football game. Such dedication from them is so unique and pure that that alone is already an immense accomplishment.
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    Joanna Shen

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    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Marching Band and Color guard Empty Re: Marching Band and Color guard

    Post  Joanna Shen on Wed Sep 23, 2009 4:57 pm

    When thinking of a football field, what first comes to mind is a football team who plays on the field. Similarly, when thinking of a marching band, a common supposition would be that the band would be marching on a street to the tune of “When the Saints Go Marching In.” One would assume that the respective team or group would perform in their respective area.
    However, the football field isn’t used solely for winning touchdowns or kickoffs, but also for presenting choreographed performances by the marching band, varsity percussion, and colorguard. This competitive field show consists of four songs complete with intense foot work, variation in tempo, and different types of equipment colorguard integrates into their routine. Halftime during any varsity football home game consists of the band, percussion, and colorguard unleashing their intriguing field show.
    The theme of this spectacular show varies with every year. For instance, this season’s theme revolves around Egypt. The music is composed by Sam Cardon and was transcribed, adapted, and arranged by Bill Hoehne to resemble Persian and Egyptian music. Sophomore Bryan Mak describes the music as “very flowy in some parts, and really loud and cool-sounding in others.” While embellishing such intricate music, the band, percussion, and colorguard manage to present all of this while marching. So far, the colorguard, band, and percussion’s drill has led them to create many Egyptian-themed shapes, such as eyes and pyramids. For another slow-paced song, the music turns into a ballad filled with body movements from the band and percussion. Such coordination blends in perfectly with the pace of their songs.
    Colorguard is responsible for most of the visual entertainment shown throughout the entire performance. The beginning of the show starts off mystically with very detailed dance movements such as walk overs and back bends, as well as partner work. Soon after, instead of spinning the usual flag with a colorful silk attached, colorguard members perform with only a single 7-foot pole. Impressive saber work is also displayed and the team performs difficult routines, making it look simply incredulous. For the freshmen on the team still trying to get used to such heart-pumping work, some, like freshman Anna Miyajima, find it “hard learning new work, but really cool to be part of such an amazing show.”
    Of course, no one can visualize such a performance just by reading an article, no matter how descriptive it may be. With that said, to observe such fantasia in the making isn’t just any ordinary show, it is a journey that takes the audience through Egypt with twists and turns all around. Although the band, colorguard, and percussion aren’t quite finished choreographing the entire show, this would give one an even bigger reason to come and watch them at each and every home football game. Such dedication from them is so unique and pure that their devotion alone is already an immense accomplishment.

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      Current date/time is Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:09 pm