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    oisheeshemontee

    Posts : 145
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 22

    Mock Trial Club

    Post  oisheeshemontee on Fri Dec 04, 2009 1:09 am

    Quotes to come:

    They’re guilty – of being the coolest club on campus! Constitutional Rights Foundation, better known as Mock Trial Club, is a new academic team that focuses on the complicated and dramatic processes surrounding a courtroom trial.

    Being the first of its kind for AHS, Mock Trial Club operates very differently from regular academic teams. The whole team receives the details of one murder case, and then spends weeks preparing both an argument for the prosecution side and for the defense. This involves every member taking on a specific role in the courtroom, ranging from attorneys and prosecutors to witnesses, clerks, and bailiffs. Unlike other academic teams, Mock Trial Club only competes in one annual tournament – The Mock Trial Competition, held at the L.A. County Supreme Courthouse on Oct. __

    This year’s case is People vs. Bratton, a murder trial in which an aspiring comedian is accused of strangling a mouthy critic after the critic posted a negative review on a business review site. The witnesses for this case ranged from comedy club managers and struggling comedians to doctors and detectives.

    The competition proceeds in an elimination format, where teams must win every round in order to advance to the next level of competition. There are two preliminary rounds, followed by octo-finals, quarter finals, semi-finals, and a final round to determine the L.A. County champion. The winner then moves on the statewide level of competition and if they win there, they proceed to the national level.

    Experienced judges preside over the trials and decide the verdicts on the pretrial motions and the defendant’s innocence. ABCDEFG said, “Our judge was an actual juvenile judge so he was really comfortable with us. We even had a question and answer session after the round ended.”

    Each round starts off with a pretrial motion, where the pretrial lawyers from both teams debate on whether or not the preclusion of a certain piece of evidence is constitutional. This year’s pretrial motion was to preclude “Inbox” and “Sent” messages found on a private internet account as outside the scope of the search warrant. In both Rounds 1 and 2, senior Andrew Chang played the role of the pretrial lawyer and won both of his motions. Opening statements followed, where junior Ray Chao introduced the case, witnesses, and evidence. After that, the direct and cross-examination period began where prosecutors had the opportunity to question witnesses. The closing statements, delivered by senior Carl Trigilio, summarized the entire case and strengthened the team’s arguments.

    Ironically, although AHS won both the pretrial motions and the verdicts, they lost the competition by one point. AHS Mock Trial’s season may be over, but the team members still remain optimistic for next year. HIJKLMNOP remarked, “This was Arcadia’s first year ever competing in the Mock Trial Competition and we have a lot of potential. I believe that pound-for-pound, our talent surpasses the other teams’ abilities and with more time and effort, we will sail through next year’s competition.” There’s one thing that’s for sure, AHS Constitutional Rights Foundation will never acQUIT!

    jennylin

    Posts : 20
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Mock Trial Club

    Post  jennylin on Sat Dec 05, 2009 12:59 am

    who's the adviser of this club?

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Mock Trial Club

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Sun Dec 06, 2009 11:28 pm

    there's nothing to change. so just add the advisor's name in there somewhere, like jenny said, and the quotes and ill check it again.

    nancyxiao

    Posts : 170
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Mock Trial Club

    Post  nancyxiao on Tue Dec 08, 2009 12:46 pm

    They’re guilty – of being the coolest club on campus! Constitutional Rights Foundation, better known as Mock Trial Club, is a new academic team that focuses on the complicated and dramatic processes surrounding a courtroom trial.

    Being the first of its kind for AHS, Mock Trial Club, advised by Mr. Jason Barclay, operates very differently from regular academic teams. The whole team receives the details of one murder case, and then spends weeks working with their attorney coaches to prepare both an argument for the prosecution side and for the defense. This involves every member taking on a specific role in the courtroom, ranging from attorneys and prosecutors to witnesses, clerks, and bailiffs. The AHS team's coaches are Greg Fisher and Tia Fisher; Mr. Fisher is a successful attorney and Mrs. Fisher was appointed to the L.A. County Superior Court. Unlike other academic teams, Mock Trial Club only competes in one annual tournament – The Mock Trial Competition, held at the L.A. County Supreme Courthouse from Nov. 2 to Nov. 30.

    This year’s case is People vs. Bratton, a murder trial in which an aspiring comedian is accused of strangling a mouthy critic after the critic posted a negative review on a business review site. The witnesses for this case ranged from comedy club managers and struggling comedians to doctors and detectives.

    The competition proceeds in an elimination format, where teams must win every round in order to advance to the next level of competition. There are two preliminary rounds, followed by octo-finals, quarter finals, semi-finals, and a final round to determine the L.A. County champion. The winner then moves on the statewide level of competition and if they win there, they proceed to the national level.

    Experienced judges preside over the trials and decide the verdicts on the pretrial motions and the defendant’s innocence. ABCDEFG said, “Our judge was an actual juvenile judge so he was really comfortable with us. We even had a question and answer session after the round ended.”

    Each round starts off with a pretrial motion, where the pretrial lawyers from both teams debate on whether or not the preclusion of a certain piece of evidence is constitutional. This year’s pretrial motion was to preclude “Inbox” and “Sent” messages found on a private internet account as outside the scope of the search warrant. In both Rounds 1 and 2, senior Andrew Chang played the role of the pretrial lawyer and won both of his motions. Opening statements followed, where junior Ray Chao introduced the case, witnesses, and evidence. After that, the direct and cross-examination period began where prosecutors had the opportunity to question witnesses. The closing statements, delivered by senior Carl Trigilio, summarized the entire case and strengthened the team’s arguments. Quote from Mr. Barclay

    Ironically, although AHS won both the pretrial motions and the verdicts, they lost the competition by one point. AHS Mock Trial’s season may be over, but the team members still remain optimistic for next year. HIJKLMNOP remarked, “This was Arcadia’s first year ever competing in the Mock Trial Competition and we have a lot of potential. I believe that pound-for-pound, our talent surpasses the other teams’ abilities and with more time and effort, we will sail through next year’s competition.” There’s one thing that’s for sure: AHS Constitutional Rights Foundation will never acQUIT!.

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Mock Trial Club

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Tue Dec 08, 2009 9:52 pm

    They’re guilty – of being the coolest club on campus! Constitutional Rights Foundation, better known as Mock Trial Club, is a new academic team that focuses on the complicated and dramatic processes surrounding a courtroom trial.

    Being the first of its kind for AHS, Mock Trial Club, advised by Mr. Jason Barclay, operates very differently from regular academic teams. The whole team receives the details of one murder case, and then spends weeks working with their attorney coaches to prepare both an argument for the prosecution side and for the defense. This involves every member taking on a specific role in the courtroom, ranging from attorneys and prosecutors to witnesses, clerks, and bailiffs. The AHS team's coaches are Greg Fisher and Tia Fisher; Mr. Fisher is a successful attorney and Mrs. Fisher was appointed to the L.A. County Superior Court. Unlike other academic teams, Mock Trial Club only competes in one annual tournament – The Mock Trial Competition, [which was held] held at the L.A. County Supreme Courthouse from Nov. 2 to Nov. 30.

    This year’s case is [was] People vs. Bratton, a murder trial in which an aspiring comedian is [was] accused of strangling a mouthy critic after the critic posted a negative review on a business review site. The witnesses for this case ranged from comedy club managers and struggling comedians to doctors and detectives.

    The competition proceeds in an elimination format, where teams must win every round in order to advance to the next level of competition. There are two preliminary rounds, followed by octo-finals, quarter finals, semi-finals, and a final round to determine the L.A. County champion. The winner then moves on the statewide level of competition and if they win there, they proceed to the national level.

    Experienced judges preside over the trials and decide the verdicts on the pretrial motions and the defendant’s innocence. ABCDEFG said, “Our judge was an actual juvenile judge so he was really comfortable with us. We even had a question and answer session after the round ended.”

    Each round starts off with a pretrial motion, where the pretrial lawyers from both teams debate on whether or not the preclusion of a certain piece of evidence is constitutional. This year’s pretrial motion was to preclude “Inbox” and “Sent” messages found on a private internet account as outside the scope of the search warrant. In both Rounds 1 and 2, senior Andrew Chang played the role of the pretrial lawyer and won both of his motions. Opening statements followed, where junior Ray Chao introduced the case, witnesses, and evidence. After that, the direct and cross-examination period began where prosecutors had the opportunity to question witnesses. The closing statements, delivered by senior Carl Trigilio, summarized the entire case and strengthened the team’s arguments. Quote from Mr. Barclay

    Ironically, although AHS won both the pretrial motions and the verdicts, they lost the competition by one point. AHS Mock Trial’s season may be over, but the team members still remain optimistic for next year. HIJKLMNOP remarked, “This was Arcadia’s first year ever competing in the Mock Trial Competition and we have a lot of potential. I believe that pound-for-pound, our talent surpasses the other teams’ abilities and with more time and effort, we will sail through next year’s competition.” There’s one thing that’s for sure: AHS Constitutional Rights Foundation will never acQUIT!.

    nancyxiao

    Posts : 170
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Mock Trial Club

    Post  nancyxiao on Wed Dec 09, 2009 10:40 pm

    They’re guilty – of being the coolest club on campus! Constitutional Rights Foundation, better known as Mock Trial Club, is a new academic team that focuses on the complicated and dramatic processes surrounding a courtroom trial.

    Being the first of its kind for AHS, Mock Trial Club, advised by Mr. Jason Barclay, operates very differently from regular academic teams. The whole team receives the details of one murder case, and then spends weeks working with their attorney coaches to prepare both an argument for the prosecution side and for the defense. This involves every member taking on a specific role in the courtroom, ranging from attorneys and prosecutors to witnesses, clerks, and bailiffs. The AHS team's coaches are Greg Fisher and Tia Fisher; Mr. Fisher is a successful attorney and Mrs. Fisher was appointed to the L.A. County Superior Court. Unlike other academic teams, Mock Trial Club only competes in one annual tournament – The Mock Trial Competition, which was held at the L.A. County Supreme Courthouse from Nov. 2 to Nov. 30.

    This year’s case was People vs. Bratton, a murder trial in which an aspiring comedian was accused of strangling a mouthy critic after the critic posted a negative review on a business review site. The witnesses for this case ranged from comedy club managers and struggling comedians to doctors and detectives.

    The competition proceeds in an elimination format, where teams must win every round in order to advance to the next level of competition. There are two preliminary rounds, followed by octo-finals, quarter finals, semi-finals, and a final round to determine the L.A. County champion. The winner then moves on the statewide level of competition and if they win there, they proceed to the national level.

    Experienced judges preside over the trials and decide the verdicts on the pretrial motions and the defendant’s innocence. ABCDEFG said, “Our judge was an actual juvenile judge so he was really comfortable with us. We even had a question and answer session after the round ended.”

    Each round starts off with a pretrial motion, where the pretrial lawyers from both teams debate on whether or not the preclusion of a certain piece of evidence is constitutional. This year’s pretrial motion was to preclude “Inbox” and “Sent” messages found on a private internet account as outside the scope of the search warrant. In both Rounds 1 and 2, senior Andrew Chang played the role of the pretrial lawyer and won both of his motions. Opening statements followed, where junior Ray Chao introduced the case, witnesses, and evidence. After that, the direct and cross-examination period began where prosecutors had the opportunity to question witnesses. The closing statements, delivered by senior Carl Trigilio, summarized the entire case and strengthened the team’s arguments. Quote from Mr. Barclay

    Ironically, although AHS won both the pretrial motions and the verdicts, they lost the competition by one point. AHS Mock Trial’s season may be over, but the team members still remain optimistic for next year. Constitutional Rights Foundation President junior Ray Chao remarked, “This was Arcadia’s first year ever competing in the Mock Trial Competition and we have a lot of potential. I believe that pound-for-pound, our talent surpasses the other teams’ abilities and with more time and effort, we will sail through next year’s competition.” There’s one thing that’s for sure: AHS Constitutional Rights Foundation will never acQUIT!.

    nancyxiao

    Posts : 170
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Mock Trial Club

    Post  nancyxiao on Fri Dec 11, 2009 12:28 pm

    They’re guilty – of being the coolest club on campus! Constitutional Rights Foundation (CRF) is a new academic team that focuses on the complicated and dramatic processes surrounding a courtroom trial.

    Being the first of its kind for AHS, CRF, advised by Mr. Jason Barclay, operates very differently from regular academic teams. The whole team receives the details of one murder case, and then spends weeks working with their attorney coaches to prepare both an argument for the prosecution side and for the defense. This involves every member taking on a specific role in the courtroom, ranging from attorneys and prosecutors to witnesses, clerks, and bailiffs. The AHS team's attorney coaches are Greg Fisher and Tia Fisher; Mr. Fisher is a successful attorney who had worked for ________________ for __ years, and Mrs. Fisher is a judge who was appointed to the L.A. County Superior Court by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Unlike other academic teams, CRF only competes in one annual tournament – The Mock Trial Competition, which was held at the L.A. County Supreme Courthouse from Nov. 2 to Nov. 30.

    This year’s case was People vs. Bratton, a murder trial in which an aspiring comedian was accused of strangling a mouthy critic after the critic posted a negative review on a business review site. The witnesses for this case ranged from comedy club managers and struggling comedians to doctors and detectives.

    The competition proceeds in an elimination format, where teams must win every round in order to advance to the next level of competition. There are two preliminary rounds, followed by octo-finals, quarter finals, semi-finals, and a final round to determine the L.A. County champion. The winner then moves on the statewide level of competition and if they win there, they proceed to the national level.

    Experienced judges preside over the trials and decide the verdicts on the pretrial motions and the defendant’s innocence. Sophomore Amit Akula said, “Our judge was an actual juvenile judge so he was really comfortable with us. We even had a question and answer session after the round ended.”

    Each round starts off with a pretrial motion, where the pretrial lawyers from both teams debate on whether or not the preclusion of a certain piece of evidence is constitutional. This year’s pretrial motion was to preclude “Inbox” and “Sent” messages found on a private internet account as outside the scope of the search warrant. In both Rounds 1 and 2, senior Andrew Chang played the role of the pretrial lawyer and won both of his motions. Opening statements followed, where junior Ray Chao introduced the case, witnesses, and evidence. After that, the direct and cross-examination period began where prosecutors had the opportunity to question witnesses. The closing statements, delivered by senior Carl Trigilio, summarized the entire case and strengthened the team’s arguments. Their adviser, Mr. Barclay, remarked, “They were awesome and I feel that they completely deserve to win. They amazed me because they made such a huge improvement.”

    Ironically, although AHS won both the pretrial motions and the verdicts, they lost the competition by one point. “Each and every one on the team was very strong in the courtroom. I happen to think that trial lawyers are born not made and [each member of the team] has the "it" factor to be in a courtroom trying cases successfully,” said Mr. Fisher, one of the team’s attorney coaches.

    CRF’s season may be over, but the team members still remain optimistic for next year. CRF president junior Ray Chao remarked, “This was Arcadia’s first year ever competing in the Mock Trial Competition and we have a lot of potential. I believe that pound-for-pound, our talent surpasses the other teams’ abilities and with more time and effort, we will sail through next year’s competition.” There’s one thing that’s for sure: AHS Constitutional Rights Foundation will never acQUIT!.

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