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    Young Dong Tofu

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    theresalee

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Young Dong Tofu

    Post  theresalee on Fri Dec 04, 2009 4:42 am

    Young Dong Tofu

    Oh, the weather outside is frightful. But the food is so delightful…especially on a cold winter day eating soup! As the chilly atmosphere of the oncoming season begins to settle in, we begin to crave more and more hot foods to keep ourselves warm and toasty. And what better way to do so than to dine on some spicy tofu soup? Spotted! T scurries into Young Dong Tofu for hot meal on a cold day.
    Located in the Pavilions plaza right next to L.A. Fitness, Young Dong Tofu is a small scale Korean Restaurant overlooked by many. This Korean BBQ restaurant sports a comfortable but elegant look with its plain brown and black marbled tables and wood paneled floors. There is nothing that stands out except possibly the mini waterfall panel near the entrance of the store, and that’s just the decoration. I went kind of early, before the prime dinnertime for many, so there was not any wait time at all. But I have heard reports about long waiting times during busy Saturday nights and lunch times though.
    Immediately after sitting down, we were served a small salad with homemade sweet and sour dressing and a glass of water. Opening appetizer, I assumed. I took a quick glance over the menu but didn’t find anything to be out of the ordinary. Combinations, composed of either meat or assorted mixtures and a tofu soup, ranged from $12-$15 (also dependent on dinner or lunch), everything on the tofu menu was almost $9, and items from the special menu were highest at $14 and lowest at $5. Other than their specialty of tofu, Young Dong also serves up many other dishes such as cold noodles and Korean bean cakes.
    I ordered a B.B.Q. Beef Rib (also known as galbi in Korean) plus seafood tofu combination for a friend and me. A few minutes later, the side dishes were brought out (called banchan in Korean). There were a total of six. The first was mung bean cake, which is a flat pancake made with ground beans and other ingredients, or in this case, green onion and bean sprouts. The others included kimchi, sweet and sour seaweed, spiced squid and cucumber over white cabbage, peppered bean sprouts, and oi kimchi (cucumbers in chili sauce).
    Soon after, the tofu soup was brought out, bubbling and smoking, in a black ceramic bowl alongside with the steaming hot rice, which was also encased within a ceramic bowl as well. I quickly cracked the raw egg they provided and stirred it around the bowl to fully cook it. Too slowly cool down the soup, I mixed a few bites of the soup at a time with the rice as to perfectly balance out the rich seafood and saltiness. The tofu was soft and almost liquid, but full of taste and melded with the soup nicely. After while, the BBQ beef ribs came on a sizzling plate and I watched and smelled in amazement as the onions under the beef were being grilled right before my eyes. The ribs were evenly marinated and cooked to the tee.
    The meal altogether was very delectable and taste-bud-stimulating. The contrast between all the cooled side dishes combined with the hot main dishes was an all encompassing treat. Especially with the Christmas music blasting through the radio, I could definitely feel the coolness of winter approaching. Young Dong provided a tasty meal as well as a spicy cultural experience.



    P.S. Apologies for the mediocre rough! Will polish up a lot more this weekend!!

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Young Dong Tofu

    Post  reginaliu on Sat Dec 05, 2009 12:18 pm

    Young Dong Tofu

    Oh, the weather outside is frightful. But the food is so delightful…especially on a cold winter day eating soup! As the chilly atmosphere of the oncoming season begins to settle in, we begin to crave more and more hot foods to keep ourselves warm and toasty. And what better way to do so than to dine on some spicy tofu soup? Spotted! T scurries into Young Dong Tofu for [a] hot meal on a cold day.
    Located in the Pavilions plaza right next to L.A. Fitness, Young Dong Tofu is a small scale Korean Restaurant overlooked by many. This Korean BBQ restaurant sports a comfortable but elegant look with its plain brown and black marbled tables and wood paneled floors. There is nothing that stands out except possibly the mini waterfall panel near the entrance of the store, and that’s just the decoration. I went kind of early, before the prime dinnertime for many, so there was not any wait time at all. But I have heard reports about long waiting times during busy Saturday nights and lunch times though [delete either "But" or "though"].
    Immediately after sitting down, we [change to "I" or define "we"] were served a small salad with homemade sweet and sour dressing and a glass of water. Opening appetizer, I assumed. I took a quick glance over the menu but didn’t find anything to be out of the ordinary. Combinations, composed of either meat or assorted mixtures and a tofu soup, ranged from $12-$15 [$12 to $15] (also dependent on dinner or lunch), everything on the tofu menu was almost $9, and items from the special menu were highest at $14 and lowest at $5. Other than their specialty of tofu, Young Dong also serves up many other dishes such as cold noodles and Korean bean cakes.
    I ordered a B.B.Q. Beef Rib (also known as galbi in Korean) plus [a] seafood tofu combination for a friend and me. A few minutes later, the side dishes were brought out (called banchan in Korean). There were a total of six. The first was mung bean cake, which is a flat pancake made with ground beans and other ingredients, or in this case, green onion and bean sprouts. The others included kimchi, sweet and sour seaweed, spiced squid and cucumber over white cabbage, peppered bean sprouts, and oi kimchi (cucumbers in chili sauce).
    Soon after, the tofu soup was brought out, bubbling and smoking, in a black ceramic bowl alongside with the steaming hot rice, which was also encased within a ceramic bowl as well [delete "also" or "as well"]. I quickly cracked the raw egg they provided and stirred it around the bowl to fully cook it. Too [to] slowly cool down the soup, I mixed a few bites of the soup at a time with the rice as to perfectly balance out the rich seafood and saltiness. The tofu was soft and almost liquid, but full of taste and melded with the soup nicely. After [a] while, the BBQ beef ribs came on a sizzling plate and I watched and smelled in amazement as the onions under the beef were being grilled right before my eyes. The ribs were evenly marinated and cooked to the tee.
    The meal altogether was very delectable and taste-bud-stimulating. The contrast between all the cooled side dishes combined with the hot main dishes was an all encompassing treat. Especially with the Christmas music blasting through the radio, I could definitely feel the coolness of winter approaching. Young Dong provided a tasty meal as well as a spicy cultural experience.



    P.S. Apologies for the mediocre rough! Will polish up a lot more this weekend!!

    theresalee

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Young Dong Tofu

    Post  theresalee on Mon Dec 07, 2009 1:51 am

    Oh, the weather outside is frightful. But the food is so delightful…especially if is a nice hot bowl of soup! And what better way to ward off the chilly atmosphere of the oncoming season than to dine on some spicy tofu soup? Spotted! T scurries into Young Dong Tofu with a friend in hopes of grabbing a hot meal on a cold day. Will it bring on the heat, or will we be left out in the cold?
    Located in the Pavilions plaza right next to L.A. Fitness, Young Dong Tofu is a small scale Korean Restaurant overlooked by many. This Korean BBQ restaurant sports a comfortable but elegant look with its plain brown and black marbled tables and wood paneled floors. We arrived early, long before the prime dinnertime for many, so there was no wait time at all. But I have heard reports about long waiting times during busy Saturday nights and lunch times. On the other hand, long lines suggest superb food!
    Immediately after sitting down, we were served a small salad with homemade sweet and sour dressing and a glass of water. The opening appetizer, I assumed. I took a quick glance over the menu but didn’t find anything to be out of the ordinary. Combinations, composed of either meat or assorted mixtures and a tofu soup, ranged from $12 to $15 (dependent on dinner or lunch), everything on the tofu menu was almost $9, and items from the special menu were highest at $14 and lowest at $5. Other than their specialty of tofu, Young Dong also serves up many other dishes such as cold noodles and Korean bean cakes.
    I ordered a B.B.Q. Beef Rib (also known as galbi in Korean) with a seafood tofu combination for a friend and me. A few minutes later, the side dishes were brought out (called banchan in Korean). There were a total of six. The first was mung bean cake, which is a flat pancake made with ground beans and other ingredients, or in this case, green onion and bean sprouts. The others included kimchi, sweet and sour seaweed, spiced squid and cucumber over white cabbage, peppered bean sprouts, and oi kimchi (cucumbers in chili sauce). It was nearly overwhelming to see all these dishes aside from my main entrée. It was even more mind blowing to find out that all of them were refillable. Talk about customer satisfaction!
    Soon after, the tofu soup was brought out, bubbling and smoking, in a black ceramic bowl alongside with the steaming hot rice, which was encased within a ceramic bowl as well. I quickly cracked the raw egg they provided and stirred it around the bowl to fully cook it. To slowly cool down the soup, I mixed a few bites of the soup at a time with the rice as to perfectly balance out the rich seafood and saltiness. The tofu was soft and almost liquid, but full of taste and melded with the soup nicely. After a while, the BBQ beef ribs came on a sizzling plate and I watched and smelled in amazement as the onions under the beef were being grilled right before my eyes. The ribs were evenly marinated and cooked to the tee, providing a meaty blend to the rice and soup.
    The meal altogether was very delectable and taste-bud-stimulating while the service was helpful and quick. The contrast between all the cooled side dishes combined with the hot main dishes was an all-encompassing treat. Especially with the Christmas music blasting through the radio, I could definitely feel the coolness of winter approaching, but Young Dong provided a warming meal as well as a spicy cultural experience. So, here’s Glutton Girl wishing you all a happy holiday! And who am I? That’s a secret I’ll never tell. You know you love me.

    XOXO, Glutton Girl.

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Young Dong Tofu

    Post  reginaliu on Mon Dec 07, 2009 5:42 pm

    Oh, the weather outside is frightful. But the food is so delightful…especially if [it] is a nice hot bowl of soup! And what better way to ward off the chilly atmosphere of the oncoming season than to dine on some spicy tofu soup? Spotted! T scurries into Young Dong Tofu with a friend in hopes of grabbing a hot meal on a cold day. Will it bring on the heat, or will we be left out in the cold?
    Located in the Pavilions plaza right next to L.A. Fitness, Young Dong Tofu is a small scale Korean Restaurant overlooked by many. This Korean BBQ restaurant sports a comfortable but elegant look with its plain brown and black marbled tables and wood paneled floors. We arrived early, long before the prime dinnertime for many, so there was no wait time at all. But I have heard reports about long waiting times during busy Saturday nights and lunch times. On the other hand, long lines suggest superb food!
    Immediately after sitting down, we were served a small salad with homemade sweet and sour dressing and a glass of water. The opening appetizer, I assumed. I took a quick glance over the menu but didn’t find anything to be out of the ordinary. Combinations, composed of either meat or assorted mixtures and a tofu soup, ranged from $12 to $15 (dependent on dinner or lunch), everything on the tofu menu was almost $9, and items from the special menu were highest at $14 and lowest at $5. Other than their specialty of tofu, Young Dong also serves up many other dishes such as cold noodles and Korean bean cakes.
    I ordered a B.B.Q. Beef Rib (also known as galbi in Korean) with a seafood tofu combination for a friend and me. A few minutes later, the side dishes were brought out (called banchan in Korean). There were a total of six. The first was mung bean cake, which is a flat pancake made with ground beans and other ingredients, or in this case, green onion and bean sprouts. The others included kimchi, sweet and sour seaweed, spiced squid and cucumber over white cabbage, peppered bean sprouts, and oi kimchi (cucumbers in chili sauce). It was nearly overwhelming to see all these dishes aside from my main entrée. It was even more mind blowing to find out that all of them were refillable. Talk about customer satisfaction!
    Soon after, the tofu soup was brought out, bubbling and smoking, in a black ceramic bowl alongside with the steaming hot rice, which was encased within a ceramic bowl as well. I quickly cracked the raw egg they provided and stirred it around the bowl to fully cook it. To slowly cool down the soup, I mixed a few bites of the soup at a time with the rice as to perfectly balance out the rich seafood and saltiness. The tofu was soft and almost liquid, but full of taste and melded with the soup nicely. After a while, the BBQ beef ribs came on a sizzling plate and I watched and smelled in amazement as the onions under the beef were being grilled right before my eyes. The ribs were evenly marinated and cooked to the tee, providing a meaty blend to the rice and soup.
    The meal altogether was very delectable and taste-bud-stimulating while the service was helpful and quick. The contrast between all the cooled side dishes combined with the hot main dishes was an all-encompassing treat. Especially with the Christmas music blasting through the radio, I could definitely feel the coolness of winter approaching, but Young Dong provided a warming meal as well as a spicy cultural experience. So, here’s Glutton Girl wishing you all a happy holiday! And who am I? That’s a secret I’ll never tell. You know you love me.

    XOXO, Glutton Girl.

    theresalee

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Young Dong Tofu

    Post  theresalee on Wed Dec 09, 2009 12:18 am

    Oh, the weather outside is frightful. But the food is so delightful…especially if it is a nice hot bowl of soup! And what better way to ward off the chilly atmosphere of the oncoming season than to dine on some spicy tofu soup? Spotted! T scurries into Young Dong Tofu with a friend in hopes of grabbing a hot meal on a cold day. Will it bring on the heat, or will we be left out in the cold?
    Located in the Pavilions plaza right next to L.A. Fitness, Young Dong Tofu is a small scale Korean Restaurant overlooked by many. This Korean BBQ restaurant sports a comfortable but elegant look with its plain brown and black marbled tables and wood paneled floors. Nothing stands out decoratively, except possibly the waterfall wall near the entrance. We arrived early, long before the prime dinnertime for many, so there was no wait time at all. But I have heard reports about long waiting times during busy Saturday nights and lunch times. On the other hand, long lines suggest superb food!
    Immediately after sitting down, we were served a small salad with homemade sweet and sour dressing and a glass of water. The opening appetizer, I assumed. I took a quick glance over the menu but didn’t find anything to be out of the ordinary. Combinations, composed of either meat or assorted mixtures and a tofu soup, ranged from $12 to $15 (dependent on dinner or lunch), everything on the tofu menu was about $9 each, and items from the special menu were highest at $14 and lowest at $5. Other than their specialty of tofu, Young Dong also serves up many other dishes such as cold noodles and Korean bean cakes. I noticed that Young Dong provides many different varieties of meat, including but not limited to chicken, beef, pok, shrimp, clam, and oyster, and in addition, their menu alternatively offers vegetarian options such as Mushroom Tofu Soup, Tofu Salad, or Rice with Vegetables in the Stone Pot.
    I ordered a B.B.Q. Beef Rib (also known as galbi in Korean) with a Seafood Tofu Soup combination for a friend and me. A few minutes later, the side dishes were brought out (called banchan in Korean). There were a total of six. The first was mung bean cake, which is a flat pancake made with ground beans and other ingredients, or in this case, green onion and bean sprouts. The others included kimchi, sweet and sour seaweed, spiced squid and cucumber over white cabbage, peppered bean sprouts, and oi kimchi (cucumbers in chili sauce). It was nearly overwhelming to see all these dishes aside from my main entrée. It was even more mind blowing to find out that all of them were refillable. Talk about customer satisfaction!
    Soon after, the tofu soup was brought out, bubbling and smoking, in a black ceramic bowl alongside with the steaming hot rice, which was encased within a ceramic bowl as well. I quickly cracked the raw egg they provided and stirred it around the bowl to fully cook it. To slowly cool down the soup, I mixed a few bites of the soup at a time with the rice as to perfectly balance out the rich seafood and saltiness. The tofu was soft and almost liquid, but full of taste and melded with the soup nicely. After a while, the BBQ beef ribs came on a sizzling plate and I watched and smelled in amazement as the onions under the beef were being grilled right before my eyes. The ribs were evenly marinated and cooked to the tee, providing a meaty blend to the rice and soup. The meat was tender and juicy, and my time not wasted on trying to chew the beef into edible sizes. I even made sure I finished the meat down to the bones as to enjoy each and every scrap of Korean BBQ goodness.
    Even as hungry as I was stepping into Young Dong, the portions of a combination meal was more than enough to satisfy my growling stomach. I would suggest always bringing a friend or two to help clean out the multiple dishes. The meal altogether was very delectable and taste-bud-stimulating while the service was helpful and quick. The contrast between all the cooled side dishes combined with the hot main dishes was an all-encompassing treat. Especially with the Christmas music blasting through the radio, I could definitely feel the coolness of winter approaching, but Young Dong provided a warming meal as well as a spicy cultural experience. So, here’s Glutton Girl wishing you all a happy holiday! And who am I? That’s a secret I’ll never tell. You know you love me.

    XOXO, Glutton Girl.

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Young Dong Tofu

    Post  reginaliu on Wed Dec 09, 2009 12:31 am

    Oh, the weather outside is frightful. But the food is so delightful…especially if it is a nice hot bowl of soup! And what better way to ward off the chilly atmosphere of the oncoming season than to dine on some spicy tofu soup? Spotted! T scurries into Young Dong Tofu with a friend in hopes of grabbing a hot meal on a cold day. Will it bring on the heat, or will we be left out in the cold?
    Located in the Pavilions plaza right next to L.A. Fitness, Young Dong Tofu is a small scale Korean Restaurant overlooked by many. This Korean BBQ restaurant sports a comfortable but elegant look with its plain brown and black marbled tables and wood paneled floors. Nothing stands out decoratively, except possibly the waterfall wall near the entrance. We arrived early, long before the prime dinnertime for many, so there was no wait time at all. But I have heard reports about long waiting times during busy Saturday nights and lunch times. On the other hand, long lines suggest superb food!
    Immediately after sitting down, we were served a small salad with homemade sweet and sour dressing and a glass of water. The opening appetizer, I assumed. I took a quick glance over the menu but didn’t find anything to be out of the ordinary. Combinations, composed of either meat or assorted mixtures and a tofu soup, ranged from $12 to $15 (dependent on dinner or lunch), everything on the tofu menu was about $9 each, and items from the special menu were highest at $14 and lowest at $5. Other than their specialty of tofu, Young Dong also serves up many other dishes such as cold noodles and Korean bean cakes. I noticed that Young Dong provides many different varieties of meat, including but not limited to chicken, beef, pok, shrimp, clam, and oyster, and in addition, their menu alternatively offers vegetarian options such as Mushroom Tofu Soup, Tofu Salad, or Rice with Vegetables in the Stone Pot.
    I ordered a B.B.Q. Beef Rib (also known as galbi in Korean) with a Seafood Tofu Soup combination for a friend and me. A few minutes later, the side dishes were brought out (called banchan in Korean). There were a total of six. The first was mung bean cake, which is a flat pancake made with ground beans and other ingredients, or in this case, green onion and bean sprouts. The others included kimchi, sweet and sour seaweed, spiced squid and cucumber over white cabbage, peppered bean sprouts, and oi kimchi (cucumbers in chili sauce). It was nearly overwhelming to see all these dishes aside from my main entrée. It was even more mind blowing to find out that all of them were refillable. Talk about customer satisfaction!
    Soon after, the tofu soup was brought out, bubbling and smoking, in a black ceramic bowl alongside with the steaming hot rice, which was encased within a ceramic bowl as well. I quickly cracked the raw egg they provided and stirred it around the bowl to fully cook it. To slowly cool down the soup, I mixed a few bites of the soup at a time with the rice as to perfectly balance out the rich seafood and saltiness. The tofu was soft and almost liquid, but full of taste and melded with the soup nicely. After a while, the BBQ beef ribs came on a sizzling plate and I watched and smelled in amazement as the onions under the beef were being grilled right before my eyes. The ribs were evenly marinated and cooked to the tee, providing a meaty blend to the rice and soup. The meat was tender and juicy, and my time not wasted on trying to chew the beef into edible sizes. I even made sure I finished the meat down to the bones as to enjoy each and every scrap of Korean BBQ goodness.
    Even as hungry as I was stepping into Young Dong, the portions of a combination meal was more than enough to satisfy my growling stomach. I would suggest always bringing a friend or two to help clean out the multiple dishes. The meal altogether was very delectable and taste-bud-stimulating while the service was helpful and quick. The contrast between all the cooled side dishes combined with the hot main dishes was an all-encompassing treat. Especially with the Christmas music blasting through the radio, I could definitely feel the coolness of winter approaching, but Young Dong provided a warming meal as well as a spicy cultural experience. So, here’s Glutton Girl wishing you all a happy holiday! And who am I? That’s a secret I’ll never tell. You know you love me.

    XOXO, Glutton Girl.

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