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    Cyber Bullying/ginger attacks

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    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Cyber Bullying/ginger attacks

    Post  ashleychi on Mon Dec 07, 2009 1:10 am

    PLEASE READ: the intro & conclusion have not been fully developed yet, but I just wanted to post this to give you guys what the gist of the article is going to be. and just in case I need to change the focus of the article.
    ----------
    Ashley Chi
    Cyber Bullying/Ginger Attacks

    There’s always a fine line for everything. When does teasing turn into harassment?

    On Nov. 20, several students kicked, punched, and harrased red-haired classmates, or ‘gingers,’ at a Calabasas middle school, encouraged by a Facebook page that had pronounced the day as “National Kick A Ginger Day.” The page, created by a 13-year-old student, apparently had drawn ideas for this page from an episode from the TV show “South Park”. “South Park”, a dark, satirical adult comedy show, had indeed aired an episode that had labeled red-haired people as “soulless” and “evil.” Ironically, the underlying purpose of demonstrating such behavior was to satirize racial prejudice. Unfortunately, the message flew over the kids’ heads, as they took the episode literally and proceeded target and attack redheads.

    Cyber bullying is a relatively new form of bullying, brought on by this era of digital technology and communication. Freshman Wilson Lin says, “Cyber bullying easily happens online, because of the anonymity.” Whether it be chat rooms, social networking sites, or texts, digital grounds are undoubtedly the easiest places for bullies to find and attack targets. Even children as young as fourth-graders have been hit by this harsher side of technology. There have been many controversies with the ways to deal with these crimes. Should cyber bullies be faced with adult charges, if they had been communicating on a site meant for adults? [also mention a few other cases of cyber bullying in the news]

    The anonymity of the Internet makes it that much easier to target people without feeling the real-life repercussions that prey on our conscience. “On instant messaging, it’s easier to insult people because you’re not talking face-to-face,” says freshman Anna Wang. Watch out, kids. There’s a new bully on the playground.

    headlines:
    The Wrong Way to Get Your Kicks
    When Virtual Bullying Goes Literal

    nancyxiao

    Posts : 170
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Cyber Bullying/ginger attacks

    Post  nancyxiao on Mon Dec 07, 2009 9:49 pm

    PLEASE READ: the intro & conclusion have not been fully developed yet, but I just wanted to post this to give you guys what the gist of the article is going to be. and just in case I need to change the focus of the article.
    ----------
    Ashley Chi
    Cyber Bullying/Ginger Attacks

    There’s always a fine line for everything. When does teasing turn into harassment?

    On Nov. 20, several students kicked, punched, and harrased red-haired classmates, or ‘gingers,’ at a Calabasas middle school, encouraged by a Facebook page that had pronounced the day as [delete] “National Kick A Ginger Day.” The page, created by a 13-year-old student, apparently had [had apparently] drawn ideas for this page [delete] from an episode from [of] the TV show “South Park”. “South Park”, a dark, satirical adult comedy show, [The dark, satirical adult-comedy show] had indeed aired an episode that had labeled [labeling] red-haired people as “soulless” and “evil.” Ironically, the underlying purpose of demonstrating such behavior was to satirize racial prejudice. Unfortunately, the message flew over the kids’ heads, as they took the episode literally and proceeded [insert "to"] target and attack redheads.

    Cyber bullying is a relatively new form of bullying, brought on by this era of digital technology and communication. Freshman Wilson Lin says, “Cyber bullying easily happens online, because of the anonymity.” Whether it be chat rooms, social networking sites, or texts [texting], digital grounds are undoubtedly the easiest places for bullies to find and attack targets. Even children as young as fourth-graders have been hit by this harsher side of technology. There have been many controversies with the [surrounding/regarding] ways to deal with these crimes. Should cyber bullies be faced with adult charges, if they had been communicating on a site meant for adults? [also mention a few other cases of cyber bullying in the news]

    The anonymity of the Internet makes it that much easier to target people without feeling the real-life repercussions that prey on our conscience. “On instant messaging, it’s easier to insult people because you’re not talking face-to-face,” says freshman Anna Wang. Watch out, kids. There’s a new bully on the playground. [This is really interesting! The only thing is: what those students did was not cyberbullying. They bullied the red-haired children in real life, so they felt the repercussions. The 13-year-old student, however, is a cyberbully. I think you should put more emphasis on the Facebook page. The physical harrassment of the other kids is a consequence of cyberbullying...maybe talk about how the 13-year-old is cyberbullying on a larger scale by influencing others...idk! sorry for rambling]

    headlines:
    The Wrong Way to Get Your Kicks
    When Virtual Bullying Goes Literal.

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Cyber Bullying/ginger attacks

    Post  ashleychi on Tue Dec 08, 2009 12:56 am

    Ashley Chi
    Cyber-Bullying/Kick A Ginger Day

    There is always a good side and a bad side to everything. Technology, the most powerful aspects in society, demonstrates this very clearly. One of the most influential products that have come out of the technology wave is the social networking site Facebook. Facebook is unique in its ability to connect people around the world, function as a place for people who share the same interests through the creation of groups and pages, and transfer pictures and videos to people who may be a thousand miles away. However, like everything else, there are many ways to use this site in damaging ways. Anyone can use the site as another place in cyberspace to harass and emotionally abuse others, either through chatrooms or groups. The “ginger attacks” that took place at a middle school demonstrated this exact situation.

    On Nov. 20, several students kicked, punched, and harassed red-haired classmates, or ‘gingers,’ at a Calabasas middle school, encouraged by a Facebook page that had declared the day “National Kick A Ginger Day.” The page, developed by a 14-year-old in Canada, had apparently drawn ideas from an episode of the TV show “South Park.” The dark, satirical adult-comedy show had indeed aired an episode labeling red-haired people as “soulless” and “evil.” Ironically, the underlying purpose of demonstrating such behavior was to satirize racial prejudice. Unfortunately, the message flew over those in the Facebook group who could not process this deeper meaning, as they took the episode literally and proceeded target and attack redheads.

    Cyber bullying is a relatively new form of bullying, brought on by this era of digital technology and communication. What’s dangerous about cyber bullying is its realm of influence that reaches a far greater amount of people than face-to-face bullying does. The aforementioned “ginger attacks” demonstrates just that. Only one student, a 13-year-old who had posted a message on the Facebook page, had been charged with a cyber bullying misdemeanor. The other students who had harassed their fellow redhead students were influenced by the one cyber bully who had spread the word via Internet. Freshman Wilson Lin says, “Cyber bullying easily happens online, because of the protection you get [from not talking to the person] face-to-face.” The emotional impact of watching someone getting taunted in real life affects people far less than leaving a hateful comment under a person’s profile.

    Cyber bullying crimes have been on the rise since 2005, when the Internet and cell phones started to become crucial means of communication. Since then, there has been an increase of teen suicides, most of them due to hateful groups and websites that were created to target specific people. “On instant messaging, it’s easier to emotionally attack people because you’re not talking face-to-face,” says freshman Anna Wang.

    From creating websites targeting specific people to passing around embarrassing photos, it’s easier for people to bully in cyberspace, where they’re protected from the outside world by a keyboard and a monitor. Whether it be chat rooms, social networking sites, or texting, digital grounds are undoubtedly the easiest places for bullies to find and attack targets and to influence others to do the same. Still, sophomore Pauline Cheng believes that “those who bully others [over the Internet] are no [less] cowardly then the ones who do it in person.” Watch out, kids. There’s a new bully on the playground.

    Virtual Bullying Goes Real
    The Wrong Way to Get Your Kicks

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Cyber Bullying/ginger attacks

    Post  ashleychi on Tue Dec 08, 2009 12:10 pm

    btw-thanks for your suggestion Nancy! Very Happy

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Cyber Bullying/ginger attacks

    Post  ashleychi on Tue Dec 08, 2009 12:29 pm

    There is always a good side and a bad side to everything. The social networking site Facebook, one of the most influential products that have come out of the technology wave, demonstrates this very clearly. Facebook is unique in its ability to connect people around the world, function as a place for people who share the same interests through the creation of groups and pages, and transfer pictures and videos to people who may be a thousand miles away. However, like everything else, there are many ways to use this site in damaging ways. Anyone can use the site as another place in cyberspace to harass and emotionally abuse others, either through chatrooms or groups.

    On Nov. 20, several students kicked, punched, and harassed red-haired classmates, or ‘gingers,’ at a Calabasas middle school, encouraged by a Facebook page that had declared the day “National Kick a Ginger Day.” The page, developed by a 14-year-old in Canada, had apparently drawn ideas from an episode of the TV show South Park. The dark, satirical adult-comedy show had indeed aired an episode labeling red-haired people as “soulless” and “evil.” Ironically, the underlying purpose of demonstrating such behavior was to satirize racial prejudice. Unfortunately, the message flew over those in the Facebook group who could not process this deeper meaning, as they took the episode literally and proceeded to target and attack redheads.

    Cyber-bullying is a relatively new form of bullying, brought on by this era of digital technology and communication. What’s dangerous about cyber-bullying is its realm of influence that reaches a far greater amount of people than face-to-face bullying does. The aforementioned “ginger attacks” demonstrates just that. Only one student, a 13-year-old who had posted a message on the Facebook page, had been charged with a cyber-bullying misdemeanor. The other students who harassed their fellow redhead students were influenced by the one cyber bully who had spread the word via Internet. Freshman Wilson Lin says, “Cyber-bullying easily happens online, because of the protection you get [from not talking to the person] face-to-face.” The emotional impact of watching someone getting taunted in real life affects people far less than leaving a hateful comment under a person’s profile.

    Cyber-bullying crimes have been on the rise since 2005, when the Internet and cell phones started to become crucial means of communication. Since then, there has been an increase of teen suicides, most of them due to hateful groups and websites that were created to target specific people. “QUOTE,” says freshman Anna Wang.

    From creating websites targeting specific people to passing around embarrassing photos, it’s easier for people to bully in cyberspace, where they’re protected from the outside world by a keyboard and a monitor. Whether it be chat rooms, social networking sites, or texting, digital grounds are undoubtedly the easiest places for bullies to find and attack targets and to influence others to do the same. Still, sophomore Pauline Cheng believes that “those who bully others [over the Internet] are no [less] cowardly then the ones who do it in person.” Watch out, kids. There’s a new bully on the playground.

    nancyxiao

    Posts : 170
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Cyber Bullying/ginger attacks

    Post  nancyxiao on Tue Dec 08, 2009 11:09 pm

    There is always a good side and a bad side to everything. The social networking site Facebook, one of the most influential products that have [has] come out of the technology wave, demonstrates this very clearly. Facebook is unique in its ability to connect people around the world, function as a [insert "meeting"] place for people who share the same interests through the creation of groups and pages, and transfer pictures and videos to people who may be a thousand miles away. However, like everything else, [Like everything else, however,] there are many ways to use this site in damaging ways. [there are many harmful ways to use this site.] Anyone can use the site [Facebook] as another place in cyberspace [a ground] to harass and emotionally abuse others, either through chatrooms or groups.

    On Nov. 20, several students kicked, punched, and harassed red-haired classmates, or ‘gingers,’ at a Calabasas middle school, encouraged by a Facebook page that had declared the day “National Kick a Ginger Day.” The page, developed by a 14-year-old in Canada, had apparently drawn ideas from an episode of the TV show South Park. The dark, satirical adult-comedy show had indeed aired an episode labeling red-haired people as “soulless” and “evil.” Ironically, the underlying purpose of demonstrating such behavior was to satirize racial prejudice. Unfortunately, the message flew over [insert "the heads of"] those in the Facebook group who could not process this deeper meaning, as they took the episode literally and proceeded to target and attack redheads.

    Cyber-bullying is a relatively new form of bullying, brought on by this era of digital technology and communication. What’s dangerous about cyber-bullying is its realm of influence that reaches a far greater amount of people than face-to-face bullying does. The aforementioned “ginger attacks” demonstrates [demonstrate---unless "ginger attacks" is a title] just that. Only one student, a 13-year-old who had posted a message on the Facebook page, had been charged with a cyber-bullying misdemeanor. The other students who harassed their fellow redhead students were influenced by the one cyber bully who had spread the word via [insert "the"] Internet. Freshman Wilson Lin says, “Cyber-bullying easily happens online, because of the protection you get [from not talking to the person] face-to-face.” The emotional impact of watching someone getting taunted in real life affects people far less than leaving a hateful comment under a person’s profile. [i think this sentence may be backward]

    Cyber-bullying crimes have been on the rise since 2005, when the Internet and cell phones started to become crucial means of communication. Since then, there has been an increase of teen suicides, most of them due to hateful groups and websites that were created to target specific people. “QUOTE,” says freshman Anna Wang.

    From creating websites targeting specific people to passing around embarrassing photos, it’s easier for people to bully in cyberspace, where they’re protected from the outside world by a keyboard and a monitor. Whether it be chat rooms, social networking sites, or texting, digital grounds are undoubtedly the easiest places for bullies to find and attack targets and to influence others to do the same. Still, sophomore Pauline Cheng believes that “those who bully others [over the Internet] are no [less] [just as] cowardly then [than] the ones who do it in person.” Watch out, kids. There’s a new bully on the playground.

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Cyber Bullying/ginger attacks

    Post  ashleychi on Wed Dec 09, 2009 12:53 am

    FINAL

    There is always a good side and a bad side to everything. The social networking site Facebook, one of the most influential products that has come out of the technology wave, demonstrates this very clearly. Facebook is unique in its ability to connect friends around the world, function as a meeting place for people who share the same interests through the creation of groups and pages, and transfer pictures and videos to others who may be a thousand miles away. Like everything else, however, there are many harmful ways to use this site. Anyone can use Facebook as a ground to harass and emotionally abuse others, either through chatrooms or groups.

    On Nov. 20, several students kicked, punched, and harassed red-haired classmates, or ‘gingers,’ at a Calabasas middle school, encouraged by a Facebook page that had declared the day “National Kick a Ginger Day.” The page, developed by a 14-year-old in Canada, had apparently drawn ideas from an episode of the TV show South Park. The dark, satirical adult-comedy show had indeed aired an episode labeling red-haired people as “soulless” and “evil.” Ironically, the underlying purpose of demonstrating such behavior was to satirize racial prejudice. Unfortunately, the message flew over the heads of those in the Facebook group who could not process this deeper meaning, as they took the episode literally and proceeded to target and attack redheads.

    Cyber-bullying is a relatively new form of bullying, brought on by this era of digital technology and communication. What’s dangerous about cyber-bullying is its realm of influence that reaches a far greater amount of people than in-the-flesh bullying does. The aforementioned “ginger attacks” demonstrate just that. Only one student, a 13-year-old who had posted a message on the Facebook page, had been charged with a cyber-bullying misdemeanor. The other students who harassed their fellow redhead students were influenced by the one cyber bully who had spread the word via the Internet. Freshman Wilson Lin says, “Cyber-bullying easily happens online, because of the protection you get [from not talking to the person] face-to-face.” The emotional impact of leaving a hateful comment under a person’s profile affects people far less than watching someone getting taunted in real life.

    Cyber-bullying crimes have been on the rise since 2005, when the Internet and cell phones started to become crucial means of communication, especially for the younger generation. Since then, there has been an increase of teen suicides, most of them due to hateful groups and websites that were created to target specific people. Freshman Anna Wang believes that "it's unfortunate that people have taken advantage of the Internet to torment others."

    From creating websites targeting specific people to passing around embarrassing photos, it’s easier for people to bully in cyberspace, where they’re protected from the outside world by a keyboard and a monitor. Whether it be chat rooms, social networking sites, or texting, digital grounds are undoubtedly the easiest places for bullies to find and attack targets and to influence others to do the same. Still, sophomore Pauline Cheng believes that “those who bully others [over the Internet] are [just as] cowardly than the ones who do it in person.” Watch out, kids. There’s a new bully on the playground.

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Cyber Bullying/ginger attacks

    Post  ashleychi on Thu Dec 10, 2009 12:48 am

    There is always a good side and a bad side to everything. The social networking site Facebook, one of the most influential products that has come out of the technology wave, demonstrates this very clearly. Facebook is unique in its ability to connect friends around the world, function as a meeting place for people who share the same interests through the creation of groups and pages, and transfer pictures and videos to others who may be a thousand miles away. Like everything else, however, there are many harmful ways to use this site. Anyone can use Facebook as a ground to harass and emotionally abuse others, either through chatrooms or groups.

    On Nov. 20, several students kicked, punched, and harassed red-haired classmates, or ‘gingers,’ at a Calabasas middle school, encouraged by a Facebook page that had declared the day “National Kick a Ginger Day.” The page, developed by a 14-year-old in Canada, had apparently drawn ideas from an episode of the TV show South Park. The dark, satirical adult-comedy show had indeed aired an episode labeling red-haired people as “soulless” and “evil.” Ironically, the underlying purpose of demonstrating such behavior was to satirize racial prejudice. Unfortunately, the message flew over the heads of those in the Facebook group who could not process this deeper meaning, as they took the episode literally and proceeded to target and attack redheads.

    Cyber-bullying is a relatively new form of bullying, brought on by this era of digital technology and communication. What’s dangerous about cyber-bullying is its realm of influence that reaches a far greater amount of people than in-the-flesh bullying does. The aforementioned “ginger attacks” demonstrate just that. Only one student, a 13-year-old who had posted a message on the Facebook page, had been charged with a cyber-bullying misdemeanor. The other students who harassed their fellow redhead students were influenced by the one cyber bully who had spread the word via the Internet. Freshman Wilson Lin says, “Cyber-bullying easily happens online, because of the protection you get [from not talking to the person] face-to-face.” The emotional impact of leaving a hateful comment under a person’s profile affects people far less than watching someone getting taunted in real life.

    Cyber-bullying crimes have been on the rise since 2005, when the Internet and cell phones started to become crucial means of communication, especially for the younger generation. Since then, there has been an increase of teen suicides, most of them due to hateful groups and websites that were created to target specific people. Freshman Anna Wang believes that "it's unfortunate that people have taken advantage of the Internet to torment others."

    Though "Kick a Ginger Day" emphasized the negative sides of human nature and cyberspace, it also brought out the core of the human spirit- love. The tactic of fighting hate with love was what 17-year-old Andrew Cohen, an Agoura Hills High School senior, had in mind when he proposed “Hug a Ginger Day,” to counteract the “Kick a Ginger Day.” The page, started a week after the "ginger attacks," has garnered over 3,000 supporters, promising to show support and love to redheads. Cohen hit it right on the nose when he proclaimed that the attacks were “a hate crime” and how “small acts of discrimination [can] elevate into a much larger problem.”

    Despite the gracious outcome of the events that had transpired from "Kick a Ginger Day," let's not forget that from creating websites targeting specific people to passing around embarrassing photos, it’s easier for people to bully in cyberspace, where they’re protected from the outside world by a keyboard and a monitor. Whether it be chat rooms, social networking sites, or texting, digital grounds are undoubtedly the easiest places for bullies to find and attack targets and to influence others to do the same. Still, sophomore Pauline Cheng believes that “those who bully others [over the Internet] are [just as] cowardly than the ones who do it in person.” Watch out, kids. There’s a new bully on the playground.

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