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    Behind the Scenes of Famous Films

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    amyleong

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2009-09-09

    Behind the Scenes of Famous Films

    Post  amyleong on Thu Jan 07, 2010 12:11 am

    Other Titles:
    Standing on the Sidelines of the Show
    What You Don’t Know Will Leave You Like Whoa
    Behind the Scene Secrets
    Chipmunks and Oompa Loompas and Star Wars, Oh My

    There is nothing like the films that keep you on the edge of your seat, laughing till yours tears come running down your face, and those cute, romantic movies that have your heart longing for more. But as we delight ourselves vegetating into the roots of the sofa, there is another thing that we long for, time to spread our feet across the sofa and become hooked on those notorious films that have us watching over and over again. But looking back at those nights on the sofa, there are so many things to reconsider, including the actors and the most awe-inspiring, behind the scenes features that will blow you away.

    Not too long ago, 20th Century Fox came out with its one of a kind smash hit – Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel. But instead of living the average life in the forest, these furry creatures get to take on the rock star life, with a family, shelter, and their ultimately high singing voices that catch audience’s eyes and ears at a drop of a dime. However, considering the unique voices of the characters, vocal artists reiterate that when recording as a chipmunk, anything you normally say will be recorded twice as slow. In addition, these artists have to over annunciate their voices to emphasize vowels and consonants to the next level. At one point, a song may even require them to hold a note for as long as 30 seconds.

    Though straining your voice may seem extremely nauseating, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory puts exercise to an entire new level. For actor Deep Roy, that is. Playing the role of 165 Oompa Loompas, he was what www.dvdtimes.co said to be “the star of this feature” by learning to be a singer, dancer, guitarist, and a drummer. Instead of using more actors, Director Tim Burton chose to use Roy to reproduce his moves hundreds of times to create an army of workers in these impressive musical numbers. Burton definitely created a masterpiece with these incredible moves, bringing up an incredible fantasy as well as creating a chocolate wonderland.

    However, Star Wars episode three part one also takes us away with thrilling numbers. For Director George Lucas, it is experimenting with a series of shots taken in less than a minute. According to www.writing-world.com, it takes about 300 people (including actors, directors, stunt producers, studio executives, extras, etc.) to produce a one minute segment of the film as well as 910 artists and 70,441 hours. What's more is that the film became a popular sensation and “one of the most expansive sci-fi/fantasy universes ever created,” states eHow contributing writer Shanika Chapman.

    Looking back at all those days sitting on the sofa snuggled up with a warm, cozy blanket, it is truly to be said that you are a witness of these inspirational works of art. But now it’s not all about watching for enjoyment, but standing on the sidelines and imagining all the behind the scenes effects and creative juices that flowed from the Directors of these films.

    amyleong

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2009-09-09

    Revision #1

    Post  amyleong on Sat Jan 09, 2010 9:31 pm

    There is nothing like films that keep you on the edge of your seat, the movies that have you laughing until yours tears come running down your face, and of course, the cute, romantic ones that have your heart longing for more. But as we delight ourselves by vegetating on the sofa, there is another thing that we long for, time to stretch our feet across the sofa and become hooked on those notorious films that have us watching them over and over again. But as we look back at those nights on the sofa, there are so many things for us to reconsider, including the actors and the most awe-inspiring, behind the scenes features that will blow you away.
    Not too long ago, 20th Century Fox came out with its one of a kind smash hit –, Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel. But instead of living an average life in the forest, these furry creatures get to take on the rock star life, with a family, a home, and their ultimately high singing voices that catch audience’s ears at the drop of a dime. However, considering the unique voices of the characters, vocal artists mention that when recording as a chipmunk, anything you normally say will have to be said twice as slow in order to generate the high-pitch voices. At one point, a song may even require them to hold a note for as long as 30 seconds. In addition, these artists have to over enunciate their voices to emphasize vowels and consonants to make it easier to hear when their voices are sped up.
    Though straining your voice may seem extremely exhausting, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory brings exercise to a whole new level. For actor Deep Roy, that is. Playing the role of 165 Oompa Loompas, he was what www.dvdtimes.com said to be “the star of this feature” by learning to be a singer, dancer, guitarist, and a drummer. Instead of using more actors, director Tim Burton chose to use Roy to reproduce his moves hundreds of times to create an army of workers in these impressive musical songs that are produced throughout the movie. Burton definitely created a masterpiece with these astonishing effects, producing an incredible fantasy as well as a chocolate wonderland.
    Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith also takes us away with some thrilling numbers. For director George Lucas, the thrill is experimenting with a series of shots taken in less than a minute. According towww.writing-world.com, it took about 300 people (including actors, directors, stunt producers, studio executives, extras, etc.) to produce a one minute segment of the film as well as 910 artists and 70,441 hours. What's more is that the film became a popular sensation and “one of the most expansive sci-fi/fantasy universes ever created,” states eHow contributing writer Shanika Chapman.
    Not only does Star Wars share some creativity, but so does the director Andy Fickman in the film, She’s the Man. Starring Amanda Bynes as Viola Hastings, the film simply takes a twist to the well-known novel, Shakespeare’s The Twelfth Night. If you paid close attention to the screening when Viola attends Illyria, there is a sign for auditions for the school play, called What You Will, which is a subtitle to The Twelfth Night. However, that is not the only reason that makes the school special. Illyria also represents the island in the original play that Viola washes up on after a dramatic shipwreck. In addition, Cessario’s is also the key character in the book, which is displayed as the Italian restaurant. The movie also concludes with Shakespeare’s famous quote, “Be not afraid of greatness.”
    In addition to the interesting aspects from Shakespeare, Rush Hour 2 is filled with action and fascinating special effects that have the audience hungry for more. In one particular scene, when the American Embassy blows up, the designer actually had to build a 1/6 scale version to blow up the 3rd and 4th floor of the building. Furthermore, Jackie Chan’s fighting motivations help the scene become an action-packed spectacular. During the two minutes of fighting in the massage scene, this took up to four days with 423 takes.
    As we look back at all those days sitting on the sofa snuggled up with a warm, cozy blanket, it is truly to be said that you are a witness of these inspirational works of art. But now it’s not all about watching for enjoyment, but standing on the sidelines and imagining all the behind-the-scenes effects and creative juices that flowed from the directors of these films.

    oisheeshemontee

    Posts : 145
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 23

    Edit #1

    Post  oisheeshemontee on Sun Jan 10, 2010 2:57 pm

    There is nothing like [the] films that keep you on the edge of your seat, the movies that have you laughing until yours tears come running [run] down your face, and of course, the cute, romantic ones that have your heart longing for more. But as we delight ourselves by vegetating on the sofa, there is another thing that we long for, time to stretch our feet across the sofa and become hooked on those notorious films that have us watching them over and over again. But as we look back at those nights on the sofa, there are so many things for us to reconsider, including the actors and the most awe-inspiring, behind the scenes features that will blow you away. [The last two sentences are kind of awkward, and they don't make that much sense. Can you try some other lead-in?]
    Not too long ago, 20th Century Fox came out with its one of a kind smash hit –, Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel. But instead of living an average life in the forest, these furry creatures get to take on the rock star life, with a family, a home, and their ultimately [I'm not sure ultimately is the right word here... think of some other word] high singing voices that catch audience’s ears at the drop of a dime. However, considering [most of us are unaware that to create] the unique voices of the characters, vocal artists [had to speak twice as slow in order to generate the high-pitched voices] mention that when recording as a chipmunk, anything you normally say will have to be said twice as slow in order to generate the high-pitch voices. At one point, [This means that] a song may even require them to hold a note for as long as 30 seconds. In addition, these artists have to over[-]enunciate their voices to emphasize vowels and consonants to make it easier to hear when their voices are sped up.
    [If you thought] Though straining your voice may seem[s] extremely exhausting, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory brings exercise to a whole new level. For actor Deep Roy, that is. Playing the role of 165 Oompa Loompas, he was what www.dvdtimes.com said to be “the star of this feature” by learning to be a singer, dancer, guitarist, and a drummer. Instead of using more actors, director Tim Burton chose to [reproduce Roy's moves] use Roy to reproduce his moves hundreds of times to create an army of workers in these [the] impressive musical songs that are produced throughout the movie. Burton definitely created a masterpiece with these astonishing effects, producing an incredible fantasy as well as a chocolate wonderland.
    Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith also takes us away with some thrilling numbers. For director George Lucas, the thrill is experimenting with a series of shots taken in less than a minute. According towww.writing-world.com, it took about 300 people (including actors, directors, stunt producers, studio executives, extras, etc.) to produce a one minute segment of the film as well as 910 artists and 70,441 hours. What's more[,] is that the film became a popular sensation and “one of the most expansive sci-fi/fantasy universes ever created,” states eHow contributing writer Shanika Chapman.
    Not only does Star Wars share some creativity, but so does the director Andy Fickman in the film, She’s the Man. [This isn't a good transition, and it's kind of confusing. Try replacing it with a better transition] Starring Amanda Bynes as Viola Hastings, the film simply takes [puts] a twist to [on] the well-known novel [Twelfth Night is a play, not a novel], Shakespeare’s The Twelfth Night. If you paid close attention to the screening when Viola attends Illyria, there is a sign for auditions for the school play, called What You Will, [the subtitle of Twelfth Night] which is a subtitle to The Twelfth Night. However, that is not the only reason that makes the school special. [Delete the previous sentence, it's unnecessary] Illyria also represents [is also the name of] the island in the original play[,] that Viola washes up [can you think of a better phrase than washes up? It doesn't sound right saying a person washed up...] on after a dramatic shipwreck. In addition, Cessario’s [delete the apostrophe s] is also the [a] key character in the book [play], which is displayed as the [an] Italian restaurant ]in the movie]. The movie also concludes with Shakespeare’s famous quote, “Be not afraid of greatness.”
    [This transition is okay, but still rather abrupt. Can you find a better one?] In addition to the interesting aspects from Shakespeare, Rush Hour 2 is filled with action and fascinating special effects that have the audience hungry for more. In [For] one particular scene, when the American Embassy blows up, the designer actually had to build a 1/6 scale version to blow up the 3rd and 4th floor of the building. Furthermore, Jackie Chan’s fighting motivations help the scene become an action-packed spectacular. During the two minutes of fighting in the massage scene, this took up to four days with 423 takes. [His two minute fighting sequence in the massage scene took up to four days to film, with 423 total takes]
    As we look back at all those days sitting on the sofa snuggled up with a warm, cozy blanket, [we finally realize that we were truly watching] it is truly to be said that you are a witness of these inspirational works of art. But now it’s not all about watching for enjoyment, but standing on the sidelines and imagining [appreciating] all the behind-the-scenes effects and creative juices that flowed from the directors of these films.

    amyleong

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2009-09-09

    Revision #2

    Post  amyleong on Mon Jan 11, 2010 11:35 pm

    There is nothing like the films that keep you on the edge of your seat, the movies that have you laughing until tears run down your face, and of course, the cute, romantic ones that have your heart longing for more. But as we delight ourselves by vegetating on the sofa, there is another thing that we long for, time to stretch our feet across the sofa and become hooked on those notorious films that have us watching them over and over again. But as we continue our late night movie marathon, there are so many special features to look into, including the actors and the most awe-inspiring, behind the scenes features that will blow you away.
    Not too long ago, 20th Century Fox came out with its one of a kind smash hit –, Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel. Instead of living an average life in the forest, these furry creatures get to take on the rock star life, with a family, a home, and their high singing voices that catch audience’s ears at the drop of a dime. However, the unique voices of the characters, vocal artists had to speak twice as slow in order to generate the high-pitched voices. This means that] a song may even require them to hold a note for as long as 30 seconds. In addition, these artists have to over-enunciate their voices to emphasize vowels and consonants to make it easier to hear when their voices are sped up.
    If you thought straining your voice seems extremely exhausting, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory brings exercise to a whole new level. For actor Deep Roy, that is. Playing the role of 165 Oompa Loompas, he was what www.dvdtimes.com said to be “the star of this feature” by learning to be a singer, dancer, guitarist, and a drummer. Instead of using more actors, director Tim Burton chose to reproduce Roy 's moves hundreds of times to create an army of workers in the impressive musical songs that are produced throughout the movie. Burton definitely created a masterpiece with these astonishing effects, producing an incredible fantasy as well as a chocolate wonderland.
    Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith also takes us away with some thrilling numbers. For director George Lucas, the thrill is experimenting with a series of shots taken in less than a minute. According to www.writing-world.com, it took about 300 people (including actors, directors, stunt producers, studio executives, extras, etc.) to produce a one minute segment of the film as well as 910 artists and 70,441 hours. What's more, the film became a popular sensation and “one of the most expansive sci-fi/fantasy universes ever created,” states eHow contributing writer Shanika Chapman.
    Although Star Wars incorporates plenty of creativity, director Andy Fickman overpowers this artistic quality in the film, She’s the Man. Starring Amanda Bynes as Viola Hastings, the film simply puts a twist on the well-known play, Shakespeare’s The Twelfth Night. If you paid close attention to the screening when Viola attends Illyria , there is a sign for auditions for the school play, called What You Will, the subtitle of Twelfth Night. Illyria is also the name of the island in the original play that Viola ends up on after a dramatic shipwreck. In addition, Cessarios is also a key character in the play, which is displayed as an Italian restaurant in the movie. The movie also concludes with Shakespeare’s famous quote, “Be not afraid of greatness.”
    Next, is the hilarious comedy and action-packed film, Rush Hour 2. Filled with unbelievable action and fascinating special effects, this movie has the audience captivated. In one particular scene, when the American Embassy blows up, the designer actually had to build a 1/6 scale version to blow up the 3rd and 4th floor of the building. Furthermore, Jackie Chan’s fighting motivations help the scene become an action-packed spectacular. His two minute fighting sequence in the massage scene took up to four days to film, with 423 total takes.
    As we look back at all those days sitting on the sofa snuggled up with a warm, cozy blanket, we finally realize that we were truly watching inspirational works of art. But now it’s not all about watching for enjoyment, but standing on the sidelines and appreciating all the behind-the-scenes effects and creative juices that flowed from the directors of these films.

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