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    katherinebay

    Posts : 123
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Food History

    Post  katherinebay on Thu Jan 07, 2010 11:29 am

    Headlines:
    1) American Food—its History is a Mystery
    2) Where our food actually comes from
    3) A Background Check for our Food

    Even though we Americans live in the most obese country in the world, the insight on some of our most renowned foods is masked behind its scrumptious appearance. How some of America’s popular food brands first appeared onto our plates is a mystery to many, so here is the history of some American grub we love to chow down on a regular basis.

    As a comfort food of the century, Macaroni and Cheese actually started out as simple noodles with real cheese, not the powdered cheese that comes many Mac and Cheese boxes that are found in the pasta aisle of a local grocery store. Thomas Jefferson, the third president of our country, not only was a Founding Father, but was also the Father of Mac and Cheese who introduced America to the first pasta machine, starting the country’s hit sensation of this simple, yet delicious side dish. When someone says you can’t be the next doctor-lawyer in space, shun them because Thomas Jefferson was a political philosopher and a food inventor.

    Microwave popcorn is the perfect accompaniment when watching a movie, whether you’re at home or catching the next film at a movie theater. In 1946, Dr. Percy Spencer was experimenting with a tube that makes magnetic currents and creates heat, usually found in microwave ovens. When he noticed that his chocolate bar that was left in his pocket suddenly melted when near the tube he experimented by putting popcorn kernels, as well as an assortment of other foods, near the heat output and voila! Microwave popcorn was created.

    With rumors such as ‘gelatin is made from crushed animal bones or horse tongue,’ we have a skeptical outlook on such a jellylike dessert. The actuality of gelatin itself is made of a protein called collagen usually from cow or pig bones, hooves, and connective tissues. Throughout the Middle Ages, many ran out of collagen, so they got the source from deer antlers, calves’ feet, and even calves’ knuckles. Even during the ancient Greek civilization, they used gelatin for functional purposes, such as to preserve food. Jell-O was a more recent concoction, when a woman from New York, May Wait, thought of the idea to add sugar and flavoring to gelatin; however, her creation was patented by a man with the name of Peter Cooper nearly fifty years later.

    The sausage was invented way back in 9th century B.C. when it was mentioned in believe it or not, Homer’s The Odyssey. And yes freshman, useful things actually came out of this epic poem. From that point on, the sausage evolved into many different forms, which included the hot dog. In Germany, the frankfurter was created in 1484, which is why we call many fatty, juicy sausages “franks.”

    Although one of the top New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight, we Americans are known for our eating. Well, what the heck. Cheers to living to eat and remember where your American food came from before it lands in your mouth.

    katherinebay

    Posts : 123
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Food History

    Post  katherinebay on Fri Jan 08, 2010 11:54 am

    Even though we Americans live in a country with the highest rate of obesity, the insight on some of our most renowned foods is masked behind their scrumptious appearances. How some of America’s popular food brands first appeared onto our plates is a mystery to many, so here is the history of some American grub we love to chow down on on a regular basis. From mac and cheese to Jell-O to even hot dogs, here are some fun food facts to sink your teeth into.

    As the comfort food of the century, macaroni and cheese actually started out as simple noodles with real cheese, not the powdered cheese that comes in many Mac and Cheese boxes that are found in the pasta aisle of a local grocery store. Thomas Jefferson, the third president of our country, not only was a founding father, but also was the father of Mac and Cheese who introduced America to the first pasta machine, which started the pasta-making frenzy. When someone says you can’t be the next doctor-lawyer in space, shun them and ignore their one-sided viewpoint because Thomas Jefferson was a political philosopher and a food inventor.

    Microwave popcorn is the perfect accompaniment when watching a movie, whether you’re at home or catching the newest film at a movie theater. In 1946, Dr. Percy Spencer was experimenting with a tube that makes magnetic currents and creates heat, a device usually found in microwave ovens. When he noticed that the chocolate bar that was left in his pocket suddenly melted when near the tube, he experimented by putting popcorn kernels near the heat output and voila! Microwave popcorn was created.

    With rumors such as ‘gelatin is made from crushed animal bones or horse tongue,’ we have a skeptical view on such a jelly-like dessert. The reality of gelatin itself is made of a protein called collagen usually taken from cow or pig bones, hooves, and connective tissues. Throughout the Middle Ages, many people ran out of organisms to take collagen from, so they got the source from deer antlers, calves’ feet, and even calves’ knuckles. Even during the time period when the ancient Greek civilization existed, the Greeks used gelatin for functional purposes, such as to preserve food. Jell-O was a more recent concoction, when May Wait, a woman from New York, thought of the idea of adding sugar and flavoring to gelatin; however, her creation was patented by a man with the name of Peter Cooper nearly fifty years later.

    The sausage was invented way back in the ninth century B.C. when it was mentioned in, believe it or not, Homer’s The Odyssey. And yes, freshmen, useful things actually came out of this epic poem. From that point on, the sausage evolved into many different forms, including the hot dog. In Germany, the frankfurter was created in 1484, which is why we call many fatty, juicy sausages “franks.”

    Now that you know where these foods came from, as you eat them, keep in mind their historical aspects. Although one of the top New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight, we Americans are known for our eating. Well, what the heck. Cheers to living to eat, and remember where your American food came from before it lands in your mouth.

    oisheeshemontee

    Posts : 145
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 22

    Edit #1

    Post  oisheeshemontee on Sun Jan 10, 2010 3:15 pm

    Even though we Americans live in a country with the highest rate of obesity, the insight [past would work better here] on some of our most renowned foods is masked behind their scrumptious appearances. How some of America’s popular food brands first appeared onto our plates is a mystery to many, so here is the history of some American grub we love to chow down on on a regular basis. From mac and cheese to Jell-O to even hot dogs, here are some fun food facts to sink your teeth into.

    As the comfort food of the century, macaroni and cheese actually started out as simple noodles with [a topping of] real cheese, not the powdered cheese that comes in many Mac and Cheese boxes that are found in the pasta aisle of a local grocery store. Thomas Jefferson, the third president of our country, not only was [not only] a founding father [of our country], but also was the father of Mac and Cheese who introduced America to the first pasta machine, which started the pasta-making frenzy. [Divide this last sentence into two, it's rather long and rambly] When someone says you can’t be the next doctor-lawyer in space, shun them and ignore their one-sided viewpoint because Thomas Jefferson[,] was a political philosopher and a food inventor[, proved them wrong centuries ago].

    Microwave popcorn is the perfect accompaniment [to] when watching a movie, whether you’re at home or catching the newest film at a movie theater. In 1946, Dr. Percy Spencer was experimenting with a tube that makes magnetic currents and creates heat, a device usually found in microwave ovens. When he noticed that the chocolate bar that was left in his pocket suddenly melted when near the tube, he experimented by putting popcorn kernels near the heat output and voila! Microwave popcorn was created.

    With rumors such as ‘gelatin is made from crushed animal bones or [and] horse tongue,’ we have a skeptical view on such a [the] jelly-like dessert. The [truth is,] reality of gelatin itself is made of a protein called collagen[,] usually taken from cow or pig bones, hooves, and connective tissues. Throughout the Middle Ages, many people ran out of organisms [wow, so scientific. Just say animals] to take collagen from, so they got the source from [used] deer antlers, calves’ feet, and even calves’ knuckles. Even during the time period when the ancient Greek civilization existed [Even in ancient Greek civilizations], the Greeks used gelatin for functional purposes, such as to preserve food. Jell-O was a more recent concoction, when May Wait, a woman from New York, thought of the idea of adding sugar and flavoring to gelatin; however, her creation was patented by a man [by] with the name of Peter Cooper nearly fifty years later.

    The sausage was invented way back in the ninth century B.C. when it was [, and it has even been] mentioned in, believe it or not, Homer’s The Odyssey. And yes, freshmen, useful things actually came out of this epic poem. From that point on, the sausage evolved into many different forms, including the hot dog. In Germany, the frankfurter was created in 1484, which is why we call many fatty, juicy sausages “franks.”

    Now that you know where these foods came from, as you eat them, keep in mind their historical aspects. Although one of the top New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight, we Americans are known for our eating [eating isn't the right word...how about healthy appetites?]. Well, what the heck. Cheers to living to eat, and remember where your American food came from before it lands in your mouth.

    katherinebay

    Posts : 123
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Food History

    Post  katherinebay on Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:04 pm

    Even though we Americans live in a country with the highest rate of obesity, the past on some of our most renowned foods is masked behind their scrumptious appearances. How some of America’s popular food brands first appeared onto our plates is a mystery to many, so here is the history of some American grub we love to chow down on on a regular basis. From mac and cheese to Jell-O to even hot dogs, here are some fun food facts to sink your teeth into.

    As the comfort food of the century, macaroni and cheese actually started out as simple noodles with a topping of real cheese, not the powdered cheese that comes in many Mac and Cheese boxes in the pasta aisle of a local grocery store. Thomas Jefferson, the third president of our country, was not only a founding father of our country, but also was the father of Mac and Cheese. He introduced America to the first pasta machine, which started the pasta-making frenzy. When someone says you can’t be the next doctor-lawyer in space, shun them and ignore their one-sided viewpoint because Thomas Jefferson, a political philosopher and a food inventor, proved them wrong centuries ago.

    Microwave popcorn is the perfect accompaniment to a movie, whether you’re at home or catching the newest film at a movie theater. In 1946, Dr. Percy Spencer was experimenting with a tube that makes magnetic currents and creates heat, a device usually found in microwave ovens. When he noticed that the chocolate bar that was left in his pocket suddenly melted when near the tube, he experimented by putting popcorn kernels near the heat output and voila! Microwave popcorn was created.

    With rumors such as ‘gelatin is made from crushed animal bones and horse tongue,’ we have a skeptical view on the jelly-like dessert. The truth is gelatin itself is made of a protein called collagen, usually taken from cow or pig bones, hooves, and connective tissues. Throughout the Middle Ages, many people ran out of animals to take collagen from, so they used deer antlers, calves’ feet, and even calves’ knuckles. Even in ancient Greek civilizations, the Greeks used gelatin for functional purposes, such as to preserve food. Jell-O was a more recent concoction, when May Wait, a woman from New York, thought of the idea of adding sugar and flavoring to gelatin; however, her creation was patented by a man by the name of Peter Cooper nearly fifty years later.

    The sausage was invented way back in the ninth century B.C., and it has even been mentioned in, believe it or not, Homer’s The Odyssey. And yes, freshmen, useful things actually came out of this epic poem. From that point on, the sausage evolved into many different forms, including the hot dog. In Germany, the frankfurter was created in 1484, which is why we call many fatty, juicy sausages “franks.”

    Now that you know where these foods came from, as you eat them, keep in mind their historical aspects. Although one of the top New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight, we Americans are known for our “healthy” appetites. Well, what the heck. Cheers to living to eat, and remember where your American food came from before it lands in your mouth.

    oisheeshemontee

    Posts : 145
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 22

    Edit #2

    Post  oisheeshemontee on Mon Jan 11, 2010 12:57 pm

    Even though we Americans live in a country with the highest rate of obesity, the past on some of our most renowned foods is masked behind their scrumptious appearances. How some of America’s popular food brands first appeared onto our plates is a mystery to many, so here is the history of some American grub we love to chow down on on a regular basis. From mac and cheese to Jell-O to even hot dogs, here are some fun food facts to sink your teeth into.

    As the comfort food of the century, macaroni and cheese actually started out as simple noodles with a topping of real cheese, not the powdered cheese that comes in many Mac and Cheese boxes in the pasta aisle of a local grocery store. Thomas Jefferson, the third president of our country, was not only a founding father of our country [you just said 'our country', could you change the phrase?], but also was the father of Mac and Cheese. He introduced America to the first pasta machine, which started the pasta-making frenzy. [So] When someone says you can’t be the next doctor-lawyer in space, shun them and ignore their one-sided viewpoint because Thomas Jefferson, a political philosopher and a food inventor, proved them wrong centuries ago.

    Microwave popcorn is the perfect accompaniment to a movie, whether you’re at home or catching the newest film at a movie theater. In 1946, Dr. Percy Spencer was experimenting with a tube that makes magnetic currents and creates heat, a device usually found in microwave ovens. When he noticed that the chocolate bar that was left in his pocket suddenly melted when near the tube, he experimented by putting popcorn kernels near the heat output and voila! Microwave popcorn was created.

    With rumors such as ‘gelatin is made from crushed animal bones and horse tongue,’ we have a skeptical view on the jelly-like dessert. The truth is gelatin itself is made of a protein called collagen, usually taken from cow or pig bones, hooves, and connective tissues. Throughout the Middle Ages, many people ran out of animals to take collagen from, so they used deer antlers, calves’ feet, and even calves’ knuckles. Even in ancient Greek civilizations, the Greeks used gelatin for functional purposes, such as to preserve food. Jell-O was a more recent concoction, when May Wait, a woman from New York, thought of the idea of adding sugar and flavoring to gelatin; however, her creation was patented by a man by the name of Peter Cooper nearly fifty years later.

    The sausage was invented way back in the ninth century B.C., and it has even been mentioned in, believe it or not, Homer’s The Odyssey. And yes, freshmen, useful things actually came out of this epic poem. From that point on, the sausage evolved into many different forms, including the hot dog. In Germany, the frankfurter was created in 1484, which is why we call many fatty, juicy sausages “franks.”

    Now that you know where these foods came from, as you eat them, keep in mind their historical aspects. Although one of the top New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight, we Americans are known for our “healthy” appetites. Well, what the heck. Cheers to living to eat, and remember where your American food came from before it lands in your mouth.

    katherinebay

    Posts : 123
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Food History

    Post  katherinebay on Mon Jan 11, 2010 11:32 pm

    Even though we Americans live in a country with the highest rate of obesity, the past on some of our most renowned foods is masked behind their scrumptious appearances. How some of America’s popular food brands first appeared onto our plates is a mystery to many, so here is the history of some American grub we love to chow down on on a regular basis. From mac and cheese to Jell-O to even hot dogs, here are some fun food facts to sink your teeth into.

    As the comfort food of the century, macaroni and cheese actually started out as simple noodles with a topping of real cheese, not the powdered cheese that comes in many Mac and Cheese boxes in the pasta aisle of a local grocery store. Thomas Jefferson, the third president of our country, was not only a founding father of the U.S., but also was the father of Mac and Cheese. He introduced America to the first pasta machine, which started the pasta-making frenzy. So when someone says you can’t be the next doctor-lawyer in space, shun them and ignore their one-sided viewpoint because Thomas Jefferson, a political philosopher and a food inventor, proved them wrong centuries ago.

    Microwave popcorn is the perfect accompaniment to a movie, whether you’re at home or catching the newest film at a movie theater. In 1946, Dr. Percy Spencer was experimenting with a tube that makes magnetic currents and creates heat, a device usually found in microwave ovens. When he noticed that the chocolate bar that was left in his pocket suddenly melted when near the tube, he experimented by putting popcorn kernels near the heat output and voila! Microwave popcorn was created.

    With rumors such as ‘gelatin is made from crushed animal bones and horse tongue,’ we have a skeptical view on the jelly-like dessert. The truth is gelatin itself is made of a protein called collagen, usually taken from cow or pig bones, hooves, and connective tissues. Throughout the Middle Ages, many people ran out of animals to take collagen from, so they used deer antlers, calves’ feet, and even calves’ knuckles. Even in ancient Greek civilizations, the Greeks used gelatin for functional purposes, such as to preserve food. Jell-O was a more recent concoction, when May Wait, a woman from New York, thought of the idea of adding sugar and flavoring to gelatin; however, her creation was patented by a man by the name of Peter Cooper nearly fifty years later.

    The sausage was invented way back in the ninth century B.C., and it has even been mentioned in, believe it or not, Homer’s The Odyssey. And yes, freshmen, useful things actually came out of this epic poem. From that point on, the sausage evolved into many different forms, including the hot dog. In Germany, the frankfurter was created in 1484, which is why we call many fatty, juicy sausages “franks.”

    Now that you know where these foods came from, as you eat them, keep in mind their historical aspects. Although one of the top New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight, we Americans are known for our “healthy” appetites. Well, what the heck. Cheers to living to eat, and remember where your American food came from before it lands in your mouth.

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