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    D-Hall: Danger Zone

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    debbiejong

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    D-Hall: Danger Zone

    Post  debbiejong on Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:08 am

    D-Hall: Danger Zone!
    Chaos Reigned in AHS Hallways
    Survival of the Rudest
    We’re Students, not Sardines

    You may recall the chaotic passing periods during the week of Dec. 15-19. With the new construction fencing erected about the Music Buildings and L-Hall, many of us had to change our daily commute to our classes. Everyone converged in the congested middle hallway where students, packed like sardines, pushed, shoved, and squeezed their way through.

    Senior Ellen Lai described the entire experience as "terrorizing" and stated that she felt "like a herded cow going through that...MASS of bodies." Ellen expressed frustration that there were no authority figures monitoring the hallways to ensure student safety. Instead, a food cart managed to sneak into the corner of the most jam-packed area, the entrance to D-Hall, and worsen the congestion problems.

    Senior Joanna Shen noted that "the monstrosities of D-Hall [brought] out the worst in people." She remembers hearing a certain unnamed person stating that "Asians should go back to where they came from" so that the hallways wouldn't be so crammed. Considering that over half our student body is comprised of Asians, Joanna felt the comment was "extremely inappropriate" and offensive.

    Students reported seeing their peers picking up other students and moving them out of their way to get through. Others, despite their best efforts to press forward, were beat back by the torrent of students pushing relentlessly in the opposite direction. Some had their wallets stolen from their backpacks amid the confusion. One unfortunate boy dropped a stack of papers and attempted fruitlessly to retrieve them all before they were trampled upon. The utter chaos that reigned during those dreaded passing periods left students feeling frustrated and upset by the ridiculous invasion of personal space.

    Junior (?) Rhiannon Yee recalled a terrifying experience of her own: while attempting to squeeze through a throng of people, a group of big guys began pushing and forcing their way through the crowd. For Rhiannon, who is petite and claustrophobic, it was a rather traumatic experience to be "pushed around with no idea where [she] was going." She clutched onto her friend for dear life and almost smacked her head into a pole because of the ceaseless pushing and shoving.

    All in all, it was an experience few of us would want to repeat.

    Joanna Liao

    Posts : 161
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 23

    Re: D-Hall: Danger Zone

    Post  Joanna Liao on Fri Jan 08, 2010 7:02 pm

    D-Hall: Danger Zone!
    Chaos Reigned in AHS Hallways
    Survival of the Rudest
    We’re Students, not Sardines

    You may recall the chaotic passing periods during the week of Dec. 15-19. With the new construction fencing erected about the Music Buildings and L-Hall, many of us had to change our daily commute to our classes (delete). Everyone converged in the congested middle hallway where students, packed like sardines, pushed, shoved, and squeezed their way through.

    Senior Ellen Lai described the entire experience as "terrorizing" and stated that she felt "like a herded cow going through that...MASS of bodies." Ellen expressed frustration that there were no authority figures monitoring the hallways to ensure student safety. (but there was! lol) Instead, a food cart managed to sneak into the corner of the most jam-packed area, the entrance to D-Hall, and worsen (worsened) the congestion problems.

    Senior Joanna Shen noted that "the monstrosities of D-Hall [brought] out the worst in people." She remembers hearing a certain unnamed person stating that "Asians should go back to where they came from" so that the hallways wouldn't be so crammed. Considering that over half our student body is comprised of Asians, Joanna felt the comment was "extremely inappropriate" and offensive.

    Students reported seeing their peers picking up other students and moving them out of their way to get through. Others, despite their best efforts to press forward, were beat back by the torrent of students pushing relentlessly in the opposite direction. Some had their wallets stolen from their backpacks amid the confusion. One unfortunate boy dropped a stack of papers and attempted fruitlessly to retrieve them all before they were trampled upon. The utter chaos that reigned during those dreaded passing periods left students feeling frustrated and upset by the ridiculous invasion of personal space.

    Junior (?) Rhiannon Yee recalled a terrifying experience of her own: while attempting to squeeze through a throng of people, a group of big guys began pushing and forcing their way through the crowd. For Rhiannon, who is petite and claustrophobic, it was a rather traumatic experience to be "pushed around with no idea where [she] was going." She clutched onto her friend for dear life and almost smacked her head into a pole because of the ceaseless pushing and shoving.

    All in all, it was an experience few of us would want to repeat.

    debbiejong

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: D-Hall: Danger Zone

    Post  debbiejong on Sun Jan 10, 2010 4:08 pm

    D-Hall: Danger Zone!
    Chaos Reigned in AHS Hallways
    Survival of the Rudest
    We’re Students, not Sardines

    You may recall the chaotic passing periods during the week of Dec. 15-19. With the new construction fencing erected about the Music Buildings and L-Hall, many of us had to change our daily commute. Everyone converged in the congested middle hallway where students, packed like sardines, pushed, shoved, and squeezed their way through.

    Senior Ellen Lai described the entire experience as "terrorizing" and stated that she felt "like a herded cow going through that...MASS of bodies." Ellen expressed frustration that there were few authority figures monitoring the hallways to ensure student safety. Instead, a food cart managed to sneak into the corner of the most jam-packed area, the entrance to D-Hall, and worsened the congestion problems.

    Senior Joanna Shen noted that "the monstrosities of D-Hall [brought] out the worst in people." She remembers hearing a certain unnamed person stating that "Asians should go back to where they came from" so that the hallways wouldn't be so crammed. Considering that over half our student body is comprised of Asians, Joanna felt the comment was "extremely inappropriate" and offensive.

    Students reported seeing their peers picking up other students and moving them out of their way to get through. Others, despite their best efforts to press forward, were beat back by the torrent of students pushing relentlessly in the opposite direction. Some had their wallets stolen from their backpacks amid the confusion. One unfortunate boy dropped a stack of papers and attempted fruitlessly to retrieve them all before they were trampled upon. The utter chaos that reigned during those dreaded passing periods left students feeling frustrated and upset by the ridiculous invasion of personal space.

    Junior (?) Rhiannon Yee recalled a terrifying experience of her own: while attempting to squeeze through a throng of people, a group of big guys began pushing and forcing their way through the crowd. For Rhiannon, who is petite and claustrophobic, it was a rather traumatic experience to be "pushed around with no idea where [she] was going." She clutched onto her friend for dear life and almost smacked her head into a pole because of the ceaseless pushing and shoving.

    All in all, it was an experience few of us would want to repeat.

    Joanna Liao

    Posts : 161
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 23

    copy edit #2

    Post  Joanna Liao on Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:29 pm

    You may recall the chaotic passing periods during the week of Dec. 15-19. With the new construction fencing erected about the Music Buildings and L-Hall, many of us had to change our daily commute to our classes. Everyone converged in the congested middle hallway where students, packed like sardines, pushed, shoved, and squeezed their way through.

    Senior Ellen Lai described the entire experience as "terrorizing" and stated that she felt "like a herded cow going through that...MASS of bodies." Ellen expressed frustration that there were no authority figures monitoring the hallways to ensure student safety. Instead, a food cart managed to sneak into the corner of the most jam-packed area, the entrance to D-Hall, and worsen the congestion problems.

    Senior Joanna Shen noted that "the monstrosities of D-Hall [brought] out the worst in people." She remembers hearing a certain unnamed person stating that "Asians should go back to where they came from" so that the hallways wouldn't be so crammed. Considering that over half our student body is comprised of Asians, Joanna felt the comment was "extremely inappropriate" and offensive.

    Students reported seeing their peers picking up other students and moving them out of their way to get through. Others, despite their best efforts to press forward, were beat back by the torrent of students pushing relentlessly in the opposite direction. Some had their wallets stolen from their backpacks amid the confusion. One unfortunate boy dropped a stack of papers and attempted fruitlessly to retrieve them all before they were trampled upon. The utter chaos that reigned during those dreaded passing periods left students feeling frustrated and upset by the ridiculous invasion of personal space( delete) .

    Junior (?) (sophomore) Rhiannon Yee recalled a terrifying experience of her own: while attempting to squeeze through a throng of people, a group of big guys began pushing and forcing their way through the crowd. For Rhiannon, who is petite and claustrophobic, it was a rather traumatic experience to be "pushed around with no idea where [she] was going." She clutched onto her friend for dear life and almost smacked her head into a pole because of the ceaseless pushing and shoving.

    All in all, it was an experience few of us would want to repeat.

    debbiejong

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: D-Hall: Danger Zone

    Post  debbiejong on Mon Jan 11, 2010 7:15 am

    D-Hall: Danger Zone!
    Chaos Reigned in AHS Hallways
    Survival of the Rudest
    We’re Students, not Sardines

    You may recall the chaotic passing periods during the week of Dec. 15-19. With the new construction fencing erected about the Music Buildings and L-Hall, many students had to change their daily commute to class. Everyone converged in the congested middle hallway where students pushed, shoved, and squeezed their way through a torrent of people.

    Senior Ellen Lai described the entire experience as "terrorizing" and stated that she felt "like a herded cow going through that...MASS of bodies." Ellen expressed frustration that there were few authority figures monitoring the hallways to ensure student safety. Instead, a food cart was stationed near a jam-packed area, the entrance to D-Hall, worsening the congestion problems.

    Sophomore Rhiannon Yee recalled a terrifying experience of her own: while attempting to squeeze through a throng of people, a group of big guys began pushing and forcing their way through the crowd. For Rhiannon, who is petite and claustrophobic, it was a traumatic experience to be "pushed around with no idea where [she] was going." She clutched onto her friend for dear life and almost hit her head on a pole because of the ceaseless pushing and shoving.

    Students reported seeing their peers picking up other students and moving them out of their way to get through. Others, despite their best efforts to press forward, were beaten back by the surge of students pushing relentlessly in the opposite direction. Some had their wallets or other items stolen from their backpacks amid the confusion. One unfortunate boy dropped a stack of papers and attempted fruitlessly to retrieve them all before they were trampled upon. The utter chaos that reigned during those passing periods often left students feeling frustrated and upset.

    Sophomore Amit Akula recalled his bag being “throw out of [his] hands by D-Hall traffic” and subsequently moving quickly through the crowd as he hastened to retrieve it. Another sophomore, Amy Leong, remembered being “pushed so hard that [she] almost fell in the muddy grass area beside the C-Hall classrooms.”

    However, senior John Paul Karas commented that “discomfort was and will continue [to be] necessary, as construction is scheduled to continue for the next four years. But if behavior [were] conducted properly and patience [were] exemplified, the discomfort wouldn’t have been to the degree it was or will be in the future.”

    Despite school security monitoring the hallways on the perimeters, it was difficult for them to supervise the middle of the crowds, which was where most of the hostility occurred. The temporary fencing was erected the week before winter break so that the construction in that area could be completed over the two-week break, thus minimizing the amount of time students would be inconvenienced by the blockade. The fencing was dismantled before school resumed on Jan. 4. and students could once again go about their usual routes to class.

    [I need to somehow get more concrete facts from Mr. Tung today]

    debbiejong

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: D-Hall: Danger Zone

    Post  debbiejong on Mon Jan 11, 2010 1:00 pm

    D-Hall: Danger Zone!
    Survival of the Rudest
    We’re Students, not Sardines

    You may recall the chaotic passing periods during the week of Dec. 15-19. With the new construction fencing erected about the music buildings and L-Hall, many students had to change their daily commute to class. Everyone converged in the congested middle hallway where students pushed, shoved, and squeezed their way through torrents of people.

    Senior Ellen Lai described the entire experience as "terrorizing" and stated that she felt "like a herded cow going through that...MASS of bodies." Ellen expressed frustration that there were few authority figures monitoring the hallways to ensure student safety. Instead, a food cart was stationed near a jam-packed area, the entrance to D-Hall, worsening the congestion problems.

    Sophomore Amit Akula recalled his bag being “throw out of [his] hands by D-Hall traffic” and subsequently moved quickly through the crowd while he hastened to rescue it. Another sophomore, Amy Leong, remembered being “pushed so hard that [she] almost fell in the muddy grass area beside the C-Hall classrooms.”

    While trying to squeeze through a throng of people, sophomore Rhiannon Yee was shoved by a group of big guys who were pushing and forcing their way through the crowd. For Rhiannon, who is petite and claustrophobic, it was a traumatizing experience to be "pushed around with no idea where [she] was going."

    Students reported seeing their peers picking up other students and moving them out of their way to get through. Others, despite their best efforts to press forward, were beaten back by the surge of students pushing relentlessly in the opposite direction. Some had their wallets or other items stolen from their backpacks amid the confusion. One unfortunate boy dropped a stack of papers and attempted fruitlessly to retrieve them before they were trampled upon. The utter chaos that reigned during the passing periods that week often left students feeling frustrated and upset.

    However, senior John Paul Karas commented that “discomfort was and will continue [to be] necessary, as construction is scheduled to continue for the next four years. But if behavior [were] conducted properly and patience [were] exemplified, the discomfort wouldn’t have been to the degree it was or will be in the future.”

    Despite school security monitoring the hallways on the perimeters, it was difficult for them to supervise the middle of the crowds, where most of the hostility occurred. The temporary fencing was erected the week before winter break so that the construction in that area could be completed over the two-week break, thus minimizing the amount of time students would be inconvenienced by the blockade. The fencing was dismantled before school resumed on Jan. 4.

    Mr. John Tung noted that “the pains of construction never feel like a small sacrifice when we are experiencing them first hand,” and that the congestion and delays often cause “great frustrations” to those involved. However, “when all is completed, the people traveling in the hallways and using the rooms in the buildings will hopefully not remember a week of severe crowding, but appreciate the comforts of the new facilities,” he remarked.

    debbiejong

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: D-Hall: Danger Zone

    Post  debbiejong on Tue Jan 12, 2010 1:57 am

    You may recall the chaotic passing periods during the week of Dec. 15-19. With the new construction fencing erected outside the music buildings and L-Row, many students had to change their daily commute to class. Everyone converged in the overcrowded main hallway where students, packed like sardines, pushed, shoved, and squeezed their way through the torrent of people.

    Senior Ellen Lai described the entire experience as "terrorizing" and stated that she felt "like a herded cow going through that...MASS of bodies." Ellen expressed frustration that there were few authority figures monitoring the hallways to ensure student safety. Instead, a food cart was stationed near the jam-packed entrance to D-Hall, further worsening the congestion problems.

    While trying to squeeze through a throng of people, sophomore Rhiannon Yee was shoved by a group of big guys who were pushing and forcing their way through the crowd. For Rhiannon, who is claustrophobic, it was a traumatizing experience to be "pushed around with no idea where [she] was going."

    Sophomore Amit Akula recalled his bag being “throw out of [his] hands by D-Hall traffic” and then “floating” quickly through the crowd while he hastened to rescue it. Another sophomore, Amy Leong, remembered being “pushed so hard that [she] almost fell in the muddy grass area beside the C-Hall classrooms.”

    Students reported seeing their peers picking up other students and moving them out of their way to get through. Others, despite their best efforts to press forward, were beaten back by the surge of students pushing relentlessly in the opposite direction. Some had their wallets or other items stolen from their backpacks amid the confusion. One unfortunate boy dropped a stack of papers and attempted fruitlessly to retrieve them before they were trampled upon. The utter chaos that reigned during the passing periods that week often left students feeling frustrated and upset.

    However, senior John Paul Karas commented that “discomfort was and will continue [to be] necessary, as construction is scheduled to continue for the next four years. But if behavior [were] conducted properly and patience [were] exemplified, the discomfort wouldn’t have been to the degree it was or will be in the future.”

    Despite school security monitoring the hallways on the perimeters, it was difficult for them to supervise the middle of the crowds, where most of the hostility occurred. The temporary fencing was erected the week before winter break so that the construction in that area could be completed over the two-week break, thus minimizing the amount of time students would be inconvenienced by the blockade. The fencing was dismantled before school resumed on Jan. 4.

    Mr. John Tung noted that “the pains of construction never feel like a small sacrifice when we are experiencing them first hand,” and that the congestion and delays often cause “great frustrations” to those involved. However, he added that “when all is completed, the people traveling in the hallways and using the rooms in the buildings will hopefully not remember a week of severe crowding, but appreciate the comforts of the new facilities."

    debbiejong

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: D-Hall: Danger Zone

    Post  debbiejong on Tue Jan 12, 2010 12:21 pm

    FINAL (I took out John Paul's quote because it was awkward sounding...I hope the article didn't shorten by too much!)

    You may recall the chaotic passing periods during the week of Dec. 15-19. With the new construction fencing erected outside the music buildings and L-Row, many students had to change their daily commute to class. Everyone converged in the main hallway where students, packed like sardines, pushed, shoved, and squeezed their way through the torrent of people.

    Senior Ellen Lai described the entire experience as "terrorizing" and stated that she felt "like a herded cow going through that...MASS of bodies." Ellen expressed frustration that sometimes there were few authority figures monitoring the hallways to ensure student safety. Instead, a food cart was stationed near the jam-packed entrance to D-Hall, further worsening the congestion problems. While trying to squeeze through a throng of people, sophomore Rhiannon Yee was shoved by a group of large guys who were forcing their way through the crowd. For Rhiannon, who is claustrophobic, it was a traumatizing experience to be "pushed around with no idea where [she] was going."

    Sophomore Amit Akula recalled his bag being “throw out of [his] hands by D-Hall traffic” and then “moving quickly through the crowd" while he hastened to rescue it. Another sophomore, Amy Leong, remembered being “pushed so hard that [she] almost fell in the muddy grass area beside the C-Hall classrooms.”

    Students reported seeing their peers picking up other students and moving them out of their way to get through. Others, despite their best efforts to press forward, were beaten back by the surge of students pushing relentlessly in the opposite direction. At times, the traffic would come to a complete standstill.

    Some students had their wallets and other items stolen from their backpacks amid the confusion. One unfortunate boy dropped a stack of papers and attempted fruitlessly to retrieve them before they were trampled upon. The utter chaos that reigned during the passing periods that week often left students feeling frustrated and upset. Although several school officials monitored the hallways and directed students through the mayhem, it was difficult for them to supervise the middle of the crowds, where most of the hostility occurred.

    The temporary fencing was erected the week before winter break so that construction in that area could be completed over the two-week vacation, thus minimizing the amount of time students would be inconvenienced by the blockade. The fencing was dismantled before school resumed on Jan. 4.

    Mr. John Tung noted that “the pains of construction never feel like a small sacrifice when we are experiencing them first hand,” and that the congestion and delays often cause “great frustrations” to those involved. However, he added that “when all is completed, the people traveling in the hallways and using the rooms in the buildings will hopefully not remember a week of severe crowding, but appreciate the comforts of the new facilities."

    debbiejong

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: D-Hall: Danger Zone

    Post  debbiejong on Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:24 pm

    FINAL (Mr. Tung-approved)

    You may recall the chaotic passing periods during the week of Dec. 15-19. With the new construction fencing erected outside the music buildings and L-Row, many students had to change their daily commute to class. Everyone converged in the main hallway where students, packed like sardines, pushed, shoved, and squeezed their way through the torrent of people.

    Senior Ellen Lai described the entire experience as "terrorizing" and stated that she felt "like a herded cow going through that...MASS of bodies." Ellen expressed frustration that sometimes there were few authority figures monitoring the hallways to ensure student safety. Instead, a food cart was stationed near the jam-packed entrance to D-Hall, further worsening the congestion problems. While trying to squeeze through a throng of people, sophomore Rhiannon Yee was shoved by a group of large guys who were forcing their way through the crowd. For Rhiannon, who is claustrophobic, it was a traumatizing experience to be "pushed around with no idea where [she] was going."

    Sophomore Amit Akula recalled his bag being “throw out of [his] hands by D-Hall traffic” and then “moving quickly through the crowd" while he hastened to rescue it. Another sophomore, Amy Leong, remembered being “pushed so hard that [she] almost fell in the muddy grass area beside the C-Hall classrooms.”

    Students reported seeing their peers picking up other students and moving them out of their way to get through. Others, despite their best efforts to press forward, were beaten back by the surge of students pushing relentlessly in the opposite direction. At times, the traffic would come to a complete standstill.

    Some students had their wallets and other items stolen from their backpacks amid the confusion. One unfortunate boy dropped a stack of papers and attempted fruitlessly to retrieve them before they were trampled upon. The utter chaos that reigned during the passing periods that week often left students feeling frustrated. Although several school officials monitored and directed students through the mayhem, it was difficult for them to supervise the middle of the crowds, where most of the hostility occurred.

    The AHS staff is still learning from this experience. Although they alerted students of the temporary fencing, they could not fully predict such a problematic outcome. Thankfully, the fencing was dismantled before school resumed on Jan. 4, thus minimizing the amount of time students were inconvenienced by the blockade.

    Mr. John Tung anticipates similar situations in the years of remaining construction and hopes that we "will be much better equipped to address the issues, having had the experience." He acknowledged that “the pains of construction never feel like a small sacrifice when we are experiencing them first-hand,” and that the congestion and delays often cause “great frustrations” to those involved. However, he added that “when all is completed, the people traveling in the hallways and using the rooms in the new buildings will hopefully not remember a week of severe crowding, but appreciate the comforts of the new facilities."

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