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    Storm Run Off

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    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Storm Run Off

    Post  raphaellu on Mon Feb 01, 2010 11:29 am

    Raphael Lu

    Trash Washes Up

    After the relentless week of rain, Southern Californians are greeted by the warm welcoming son. As local residents rush to the beach, they can’t help but to notice that something is horribly wrong.
    Stray shopping carts, hoards of candy wrappers, and millions of twisted branches lined the beach. During to storm trash ridden waters from the San Gabriel River overflowed bring the trash onto our beaches. Even the rotten stench of sewage was able to leech onto the beach, contaminating the war.
    In Arcadia the damage is not as evident. All through the week we have had the troubles of minor flooding. The only apparent problem is a few wrappers, leaf mush lining the gutters, and a kid throwing a soft drink can into the gutters (yes, I’m taking to you).
    It is shocking that all the trash that ended on the beach was sadly resulted from our carelessness. At AHS not many people are doing much to help either. As anyone can see in the quad during lunch, hundreds of students leave trash ridden on the floor. As students finish their food it is almost instinct to cast what’s left onto the ground.
    Over the past few years, garbage rates in California kept growing and growing. Any one who has seen The Human Footprint on National Geographic, cant tell you about the shocking amount of garbage we dispose of each year. Just in the few past years, garbage islands on the ocean grow increasingly.
    Yet as the toxic sludge grows we are still sitting here when much can be done. Just by throwing away trash in the proper places we can stop incident like this from happening again.
    Lately we have been hearing radio commercials advising to help clean up Southern California. Most us just brush this off and think to ourselves that this can’t affect us that much or this message doesn’t apply to me. However, after this incident residents are given a wake up call. By seeing trash strewn onto their own front yards, people are aware of how serious our problem is.
    Now as the trash begins to clear up, we ask ourselves: How can we prevent this from happening again?


    Trash Talk
    Raining Trash

    Joanna Liao

    Posts : 161
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 23

    Re: Storm Run Off

    Post  Joanna Liao on Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:12 pm

    After the relentless week of rain, Southern Californians are (change to: were) greeted by the warm (comma) welcoming son (sun). As local residents rush (rushed) to the beach, they can’t (couldn’t) help but to (delete: to) notice that something is horribly wrong.
    Stray shopping carts, hoards of candy wrappers, and millions (a bit too much exaggeration) of twisted branches lined the beach. During to storm (comma) trash ridden waters from the San Gabriel River overflowed (and) bring (brought) the trash onto our beaches. Even the rotten stench of sewage was able to leech onto the beach, (change to: semicolon) contaminating the war.
    In Arcadia the damage is not as evident. All through the week we have had the troubles of minor flooding. The only apparent problem is a few wrappers, leaf mush lining the gutters, and a kid throwing a soft drink can into the gutters (yes, I’m taking (talking) to you).
    It is shocking that all the trash that ended on the beach was sadly resulted from our carelessness. At AHS (comma) not many people are doing much to help either (delete: either). As anyone can see in the quad during lunch, hundreds of (change to: many) students leave trash ridden (delete: ridden) on the floor. As students finish their food (comma) it is almost instinct to cast what’s left onto the ground.
    Over the past few years, garbage rates in California kept (keep) growing and growing. Anyone who has seen The Human Footprint on National Geographic can tell you about the shocking amount of garbage we dispose of each year. Just in the few past (delete past) years, garbage islands on the ocean grow increasingly.
    Yet as the toxic sludge grows we are still sitting here when much can be done. Just (delete just) by throwing away trash in the proper places we can stop incident (incidents) like this from happening again.
    Lately we have been hearing radio commercials advising to help clean up Southern California. Most (of) us just brush this off and think to ourselves that this can’t affect us that much or this message doesn’t apply to me (put in quotes). However, after this incident (comma) residents are given (have been given) a wake up call. By seeing trash strewn onto their own front yards, people are aware of how serious our problem is.
    Now (delete now) as the trash begins to clear up, we ask ourselves: How can we prevent this from happening again?

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Storm Run Off

    Post  raphaellu on Mon Feb 08, 2010 11:16 am

    Raphael Lu

    Trash Washes Up

    After a relentless week of rain, Southern Californians were greeted by the warm, welcoming sun. As local residents rushed to the beach, they couldn’t help but notice that something is horribly wrong.
    Stray shopping carts, hordes of candy wrappers, and hundreds of twisted branches lined the beach. During the storm, trash filled waters from the San Gabriel River overflowed, resulting in overflowing of trash onto our beaches. Even the rotten stench of sewage was able to leech onto the beach; contaminating the water.
    Who’s to blame for this? We are. Over the past years litter has been washed into the San Gabriel River. As rains filled the river, trash flowed out and eventually ended up on the beach.
    In Arcadia the damage is not as evident. All through the week we have had the troubles of minor flooding. The only apparent problem is a few wrappers, leaf mush lining the gutters, and a kid throwing a soft drink can into the gutters.
    It is shocking that all the trash that ended on the beach has sadly resulted from our carelessness. At AHS not many people are doing much to help. As anyone can see in the quad during lunch, many students leave trash ridden on the floor. As students finish their food it is almost instinct to cast what’s left onto the ground.
    Over the past few years, garbage rates in California keeps growing and growing. Just in the few years, garbage islands on the ocean grow increasingly.
    Yet as the toxic sludge grows we are still sitting here when much can be done. By throwing away trash in the proper places we can stop incidents like this from happening again.
    Lately we have been hearing radio commercials advising to help clean up Southern California. Most of us just brush this off and think to ourselves that “this can’t affect us that much” or “this message doesn’t apply to me.” However, after this incident, residents have been given a wake up call. By seeing trash strewn onto their own front yards, people are aware of how serious our problem is.
    As the trash begins to clear up, we ask ourselves: How can we prevent this from happening again?

    Trash Talk
    Trashed Beach: We Are to Blame

    Joanna Liao

    Posts : 161
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 23

    Re: Storm Run Off

    Post  Joanna Liao on Mon Feb 08, 2010 6:26 pm

    After a relentless week of rain, Southern Californians were greeted by the warm, welcoming sun. As local residents rushed to the beach, they couldn’t help but notice that something is (was) horribly wrong.
    Stray shopping carts, hordes of candy wrappers, and hundreds of twisted branches lined the beach. During the storm, trash filled waters from the San Gabriel River overflowed, resulting in (the) overflowing of trash onto our beaches. Even the rotten stench of sewage was able to leech onto the beach; contaminating the water. (so the water smells bad? LOL)
    Who’s to blame for this? We are. Over the past years (comma) litter has been washed into the San Gabriel River. As rains (rain) filled the river, trash flowed out and eventually ended up on the beach.
    In Arcadia (comma) the damage is not as evident. All through the week we have had the troubles of minor flooding. The only apparent problem is a few wrappers, leaf mush lining the gutters, and a kid throwing a soft drink can into the gutters.
    It is shocking that all the trash that ended on the beach has sadly resulted from our carelessness. At AHS (comma) not many people are doing much to help. As anyone can see in the quad during lunch, many students leave trash ridden on the floor. As students finish their food it is almost instinct to cast what’s left onto the ground.
    Over the past few years, garbage rates in California keeps (keep) growing and growing. Just in the (past/recent?) few years, garbage islands on the ocean grow increasingly.
    Yet as the toxic sludge grows (comma) we are still sitting here when much can be done. By throwing away trash in the proper places we can stop incidents like this from happening again.
    Lately we have been hearing radio commercials advising to help clean up Southern California. Most of us just brush this off and think to ourselves that “this can’t affect us that much” or “this message doesn’t apply to me.” However, after this incident, residents have been given a wake up call. By seeing trash strewn onto their own front yards, people are aware of how serious our problem is.
    As the trash begins to clear up, we ask ourselves: How (how) can we prevent this from happening again?

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Storm Run Off

    Post  raphaellu on Mon Feb 08, 2010 11:05 pm

    Raphael Lu

    Trash Washes Up

    After a relentless week of rain, Southern Californians were greeted by the warm, welcoming sun. As local residents rushed to the beach, they couldn’t help but notice that something was horribly wrong.
    Stray shopping carts, hordes of candy wrappers, and hundreds of twisted branches lined the beach. During the storm, trash filled waters from the San Gabriel River overflowed, resulting in the overflowing of trash onto our beaches. Even the rotten stench of sewage was able to leech onto the beach; contaminating the water.
    Who’s to blame for this? We are. Over the past years, litter has been washed into the San Gabriel River. As rain filled the river, trash flowed out and eventually ended up on the beach.
    In Arcadia, the damage is not as evident. All through the week we have had the troubles of minor flooding. The only apparent problem is a few wrappers, leaf mush lining the gutters, and a kid throwing a soft drink can into the gutters.
    It is shocking that all the trash that ended on the beach has sadly resulted from our carelessness. At AHS, not many people are doing much to help. As anyone can see in the quad during lunch, many students leave trash ridden on the floor. As students finish their food it is almost instinct to cast what’s left onto the ground.
    Over the past few years, garbage rates in California keep growing and growing. Just in the past few years, garbage islands on the ocean grow increasingly.
    Yet as the toxic sludge grows, we are still sitting here when much can be done. By throwing away trash in the proper places we can stop incidents like this from happening again.
    Lately we have been hearing radio commercials advising to help clean up Southern California. Most of us just brush this off and think to ourselves that “this can’t affect us that much” or “this message doesn’t apply to me.” However, after this incident, residents have been given a wake up call. By seeing trash strewn onto their own front yards, people are aware of how serious our problem is.
    As the trash begins to clear up, we ask ourselves: how can we prevent this from happening again?

    Trash Talk
    Trashed Beach: We Are to Blame

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Storm Run Off

    Post  raphaellu on Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:37 am

    Raphael Lu

    Trash Washes Up


    After a relentless week of rain, Southern Californians were greeted by the warm, welcoming sun. As local residents rushed to the beach, they couldn’t help but notice that something was horribly wrong.

    Stray shopping carts, hordes of candy wrappers, and hundreds of twisted branches lined the beach. During the storm, trash filled waters from the San Gabriel River overflowed, resulting in the overflowing of trash onto our beaches. Even the rotten stench of sewage was able to leech onto the beach; contaminating the water.

    Who’s to blame for this? We are. Over the past years, litter has been washed into the San Gabriel River. As rain filled the river, trash flowed out and eventually ended up on the beach.

    In Arcadia, the damage is not as evident. All through the week we have had the troubles of minor flooding. The only apparent problem is a few wrappers, leaf mush lining the gutters, and a kid throwing a soft drink can into the gutters. Freshman Josephine Truong look down on the situation. Josephine states these “people [throw them] there [because] they don’t know how much it can affect them and the environment and [because they are too lazy to properly throw it away.”

    It is shocking that all the trash that ended on the beach has sadly resulted from our carelessness. At AHS, not many people are doing much to help. As anyone can see in the quad during lunch, many students leave trash ridden on the floor. As students finish their food it is almost instinct to cast what’s left onto the ground.

    Over the past few years, garbage rates in California keep growing and growing. Just in the past few years, garbage islands on the ocean grow increasingly. Mrs. Joan Stevens agrees completely with this. She said “that it’s really tragic because animals have to suffer when it is our fault. [The trash that ends up in the ocean and on the beach] looks like food to albatross. [People have found] albatross bone with plastic where the stomach is suppose to be.” These tragedies are only a small part of the various effects of litter.

    Yet as the toxic sludge grows and animal deaths increase, we are still sitting here when much can be done. By throwing away trash in the proper places we can stop incidents like this from happening again.

    Lately we have been hearing radio commercials advising to help clean up Southern California. Most of us just brush this off and think to ourselves that “this can’t affect us that much” or “this message doesn’t apply to me.” Senior Andrew Taylor can tell you much about it. Andrew realizes that many people think “the ocean is so massive. There is no way [a] little wrapper could hurt anything.”

    However, after this incident, residents have been given a wake up call. By seeing trash strewn onto their own front yards, people are aware of how serious our problem is.

    As the trash begins to clear up, we ask ourselves: how can we prevent this from happening again?

    Trash Talk
    Trashed Beach: We Are to Blame

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