The Pow Wow Forum

The Apache Pow Wow


    Preparing for Disaster

    Share

    Joanna Shen

    Posts : 87
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Preparing for Disaster

    Post  Joanna Shen on Tue Feb 02, 2010 3:03 am

    Preparing for Disaster
    Preparing for our own Earthquake
    Tips for when the Quake Shakes our World
    With the looming tragedy of the Haiti earthquake and its many victims still fresh in our minds, it is apparent that one incident can shake the entire world. California, one of the most seismically active regions in the world, is almost for certain destined to be rocked by a 6.7 earthquake or larger by 2037. The recent earthquakes, though minute, are constant reminders to Californians that a big one is on the way. Though a natural disaster’s impacts are often difficult to calculate and predict, there are certain precautions every household should take to prepare for catastrophic events that might occur at any given moment and procedures they should abide by after the occurrence.
    To prepare for future emergencies and disasters, families are encouraged to store emergency aid skits around the house in the event that falling debris bar entrances to cabinets and hallways and prevent accessibility to essentials like first aid kits and flashlights. Essential first-aid kit items include hydrogen peroxide for wounds, prescriptions and any long-term medications, eye drops, bandage strips, cold packs, and splinting materials. Important medical information such as prescriptions can be stored in the refrigerator, which provides protection from fires and failing wreckage. Other than the first aid kit, emergency kits should include enough water for three to five days (five gallons per person) and enough canned food that requires minimal cooking if any at all, for three days. Water should be stored in plastic containers with tight fitting lids, kept away from sunlight, and changed every six months. Families are also encouraged to routinely hold practice drills on how to efficiently exit the house. Mapping out dangerous routes that involve cabinets and bookshelves and learning to avoid them will lower the possibility of injury.
    In the event of an earthquake, the first rule of thumb is to seek out sturdy tables or desks that don’t move and swiftly get under them. If there are no tables, covering your face and head with arms and standing in a strongly supported doorway or corner will suffice. Avoid huddling against walls with glass windows and hanging objects. A common mistake is to run out in the open to avoid being crushed under the falling house. However, many people are injured at the entrances of buildings when an earthquake strikes. So stay inside if you are already inside. People in crowded, public places should not run for an exit but should take hold of something stable and shield themselves from falling debris. If you’re in a vehicle at the moment, move over to the shoulder of the curb away from utility poles, set the parking brake, and stay inside the vehicle. However, remember to check for breaks in electric wiring, cracks in the pavement, and other hazards that might arise because of an earthquake.
    After an earthquake, it is never safe to assume that the danger has passed. Expect aftershocks. Aftershocks, though less intense than the major earthquake, can weaken building structures and trigger their collapse. Turn on the radio for emergency broadcasts detailing what you should do next. After, go about the house and mop up any spilled liquids such as bleach or medicine which are highly flammable and can cause fires to erupt. Gas leaks, electrical system damage, and water line damage also call for immediate attention.
    When disaster strikes, fear often smothers reason. With these few tips, hopefully every family will be able to face tragedy prepared and calm rather than frightened and anxious. If we all did our part in taking the necessary precautions, we could help lower injury rates and recover faster.

    hanarudolph

    Posts : 152
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Preparing for Disaster

    Post  hanarudolph on Mon Feb 08, 2010 12:20 pm

    With the tragedy of the Haiti earthquake and its many victims still fresh in our minds, it is apparent that one incident can shake the entire world. California, one of the most seismically active regions in the world, is almost certainly destined to be rocked by a 6.7 earthquake or larger by 2037. The recent earthquakes, though minute, are constant reminders to Californians that a big one is on the way. Though a natural disaster’s impacts are often difficult to calculate and predict, there are certain precautions every household should take to prepare for catastrophic events that might occur at any given moment and procedures they should abide by after the incident.
    To prepare for future emergencies and disasters, families are encouraged to store emergency aid kits around the house in several different spots in the event that falling debris bar entrances to cabinets and hallways and prevent accessibility to these essentials. Crucial first aid kit items include hydrogen peroxide for wounds, prescriptions and any long-term medications, eye drops, bandage strips, cold packs, and splinting materials. Important medical information such as prescriptions can be stored in the refrigerator, which also provides protection from fires and falling wreckage. Other than the first aid kit, emergency kits should include enough water for three to five days (five gallons per person) and enough canned food that requires minimal or no cooking to last three days. Water should be stored in plastic containers with tight fitting lids, kept away from sunlight, and changed every six months. Families are also encouraged to routinely hold practice drills on how to efficiently exit the house. Mapping out dangerous routes that involve cabinets and bookshelves and learning to avoid them will lower the possibility of injury.
    In the event of an earthquake, the first rule of thumb is to seek out sturdy tables or desks that don’t move and swiftly get under them. If there are no tables, covering your face and head with arms and standing in a strongly supported doorway or corner will suffice. Avoid huddling against walls with glass windows and hanging objects. A common mistake is to run out in the open to avoid being crushed under the falling house. However, many people are injured at the entrances of buildings while trying to get out when an earthquake strikes so stay inside if you are already inside. People in crowded, public places should not run for an exit but should take hold of something stable and shield themselves from falling debris. If you’re in a vehicle at the moment of an earthquake, move over to the shoulder of the curb away from utility poles, set the parking brake, and stay inside the vehicle. However, remember to check for breaks in electric wiring, cracks in the pavement, and other hazards that might arise because of an earthquake.
    After an earthquake, it is never safe to assume that the danger has passed. Expect aftershocks. Aftershocks, though less intense than the major earthquake, can weaken building structures and trigger their collapse. Turn on the radio for emergency broadcasts detailing what you should do next. After, go about the house and mop up any spilled liquids such as bleach or medicine that are highly flammable and can cause fires. Gas leaks, electrical wiring damage, and breaks in water tubes also call for immediate attention.
    When disaster strikes, fear often smothers reason. With these few tips, hopefully every family will be able to face tragedy prepared and calm rather than frightened and anxious. If we all did our part in taking the necessary precautions, we could help lower injury rates and recover faster. The faster we can get back on our feet, the faster we can return to focusing on advancing America as a whole.

      Current date/time is Mon Sep 25, 2017 9:12 am