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    Orchestra Benefit Dinner

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    ChristinaZhou

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  ChristinaZhou on Wed Feb 03, 2010 12:41 am

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s benefit dinner is for you.

    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque de Orch,” or ‘Circus Orchestra.’ However, instead of creepy, dancey clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the ‘Circus Orchestra’ will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and other guest performers.

    Although the entrance ticket is a pricy $40 dollars, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestras starts their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Foundation, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows and instruments to produce even richer tones for songs.

    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surrounding them, and play three songs, “Lassus Viola,” composed by Henry Fillmore, arr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Robert W. Smith (ASCAP), and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arr. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound feel as the Orchestra plays their carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra’s won’t have that luxury. All members of the Orchestra department will have to memorize all three pieces and play them by memory at the concert. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize any song, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.” After playing their songs from memory, all members will evacuate the room, and small groups of students will take their spot on the stage.

    During the concert, not only will participants be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked out student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three Orchestras, and allows the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.

    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your need for classical music. The theme is welcoming and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it detangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent in our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    ChristinaZhou

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  ChristinaZhou on Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:19 pm

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner is for you.

    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque du Orch,” or ‘Circus Orchestra.’ However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the ‘Circus Orchestra’ will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and other guest performers.

    Although the entrance ticket is a pricy $40 dollars, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestras starts their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort into making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Club, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows, instruments, and other equipment to produce even richer tones for songs.

    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surrounding them, and play three songs, “Lassus Viola,” composed by Henry Fillmore, arr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Robert W. Smith (ASCAP), and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arr. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound feel as the Orchestra plays their carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra’s won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, all members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.” After playing their songs from memory, all members will evacuate the room, and small groups of students will take their spot on the stage.

    During the concert, not only will diners be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked out student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three Orchestras, and allows the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.

    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is festive and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it detangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent in our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  reginaliu on Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:41 pm

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s benefit dinner is for you.

    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque de Orch,” or ‘Circus Orchestra.’ However, instead of creepy, dancey [dance-y] clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the ‘Circus Orchestra’ will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and other guest performers.

    Although the entrance ticket is a pricy [pricey] $40 dollars [delete 'dollars'], it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestras [don't capitalize if you're talking about orchestras in general only if you're referring to the a specific group, Orchestra] starts [start] their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Foundation, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows and instruments to produce even richer tones for songs.

    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surrounding them, and play three songs, “Lassus Viola,” composed by Henry Fillmore, arr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Robert W. Smith (ASCAP), and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arr. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound feel as the Orchestra plays their carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra’s [orchestras] won’t have that luxury. All members of the Orchestra department will have to memorize all three pieces and play them by memory at the concert. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said,[.] “This is the first time I have to memorize any song, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.” After playing their songs from memory [delete 'from memory.' I think it's been established enough], all members will evacuate the room, and small groups of students will take their spot on the stage.

    During the concert, not only will participants be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked out student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three Orchestras [don't capitalize], and allows [allow] the students to shine in their limelight [this sounds awkward] as they play their chosen songs.

    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your need [change this to 'quench your thirst' or just change 'quench'] for classical music. The theme is welcoming and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it detangles [disentangles] itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent in [of] our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    ChristinaZhou

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  ChristinaZhou on Thu Feb 04, 2010 11:14 am

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s benefit dinner is for you.

    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque de Orch,” or ‘Circus Orchestra.’ However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the ‘Circus Orchestra’ will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and other guest performers.

    Although the entrance ticket is a pricey $40, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestra start their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Foundation, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows and instruments to produce even richer tones for songs.

    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surrounding them, and play three songs, “Lassus Viola,” composed by Henry Fillmore, arr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Robert W. Smith (ASCAP), and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arr. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound feel as the Orchestra plays their carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, all members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.” After playing their songs, all members will evacuate the room, and small groups of students will take their spot on the stage.

    During the concert, not only will participants be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked out student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three orchestras and allow the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.

    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is welcoming and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it disentangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent of our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  reginaliu on Thu Feb 04, 2010 8:56 pm

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s benefit dinner is for you.

    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque de Orch,” or ‘Circus Orchestra.’ ["Circus Orchestra"] However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the ‘Circus Orchestra’ [double quotations] will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and other guest performers.

    Although the entrance ticket is a pricey $40, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestra start their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Foundation, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows and instruments to produce even richer tones for songs.

    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surrounding them, and play three songs, “Lassus Viola,” composed by Henry Fillmore, arr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Robert W. Smith (ASCAP), and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arr. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound feel as the Orchestra plays their carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, all members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.” After playing their songs, all members will evacuate the room, and small groups of students will take their spot on the stage.

    During the concert, not only will participants be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked out student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three orchestras and allow the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.

    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is welcoming and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it disentangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent of our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    ChristinaZhou

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  ChristinaZhou on Thu Feb 04, 2010 9:01 pm



    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s benefit dinner is for you.

    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque de Orch,” or “Circus Orchestra.” However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the “Circus Orchestra” will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and other guest performers.

    Although the entrance ticket is a pricey $40, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestra start their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Foundation, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows and instruments to produce even richer tones for songs.

    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surrounding them, and play three songs, “Lassus Viola,” composed by Henry Fillmore, arr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Robert W. Smith (ASCAP), and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arr. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound feel as the Orchestra plays their carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, all members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.” After playing their songs, all members will evacuate the room, and small groups of students will take their spot on the stage.

    During the concert, not only will participants be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked out student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three orchestras and allow the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.

    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is welcoming and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it disentangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent of our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    ChristinaZhou

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  ChristinaZhou on Sun Feb 07, 2010 2:26 pm

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner is for you.

    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque du Orch,” or “Circus Orchestra.” However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the “Circus Orchestra” will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and guest performers, the Hutchins Consort.

    Although the entrance ticket is a pricey $40, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestra start their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Club, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows, instruments, and other equipment to produce even richer tones for songs.

    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surrounding them, and play three songs, “Lassus Viola,” composed by Mr. Henry Fillmore, arranged by Mr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Mr. Robert W. Smith, and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Mr. Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arranged by Mrs. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound feel as the Orchestra plays their carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, all members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.” After playing their songs from memory, all members will evacuate the room, and small groups of students will take their spot on the stage.



    During the concert, not only will guests be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked out student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three orchestras and allow the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.

    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is festive and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it disentangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent of our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    ChristinaZhou

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  ChristinaZhou on Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:18 pm

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner is for you.

    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque du Orch,” or “Circus Orchestra.” However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the “Circus Orchestra” will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and guest performers, the Hutchins Consort.

    Although the entrance ticket is a pricey $40, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestra start their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Club, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows, instruments, and other equipment to produce even richer tones for songs.

    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surround them, and play three songs; “Lassus Viola,” composed by Mr. Henry Fillmore, arranged by Mr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Mr. Robert W. Smith, and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Mr. Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arranged by Mrs. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound effect as the Orchestra plays their festive carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, all members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.”



    During the concert, not only will guests be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three orchestras and allow the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.



    The Hutchins Consort, a professional violin octet ensemble, will be making a visit to the dinner to play a few songs. Despite the appearances of the instruments, all musicians in the Hutchins Consort play a modified version of the violin. The octet of violins has a range of instruments from high to low, and covers all the lost tones in traditional string instruments. The violin octet includes:the treble violin and the soprano violin, both of which are tuned higher than a traditional violin, a mezzo violin, which creates the same sound as a traditional violin, alto violin, which replaces the viola, the tenor violin, which fills the gap left between the cello and the viola, baritone violin, which replaces the cello, and two bass violins named the bass violin and the contra bass violin. The Hutchins Consort is known for touching their audience and leaving a lasting impression with their tone and sound, and so all diners will be extrememly blessed to be able to listen to the rich sounds of a violin octet.


    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is festive and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it disentangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent of our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  reginaliu on Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:38 pm

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner is for you.

    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque du Orch,” or “Circus Orchestra.” However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the “Circus Orchestra” will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and guest performers, the Hutchins Consort.

    Although the entrance ticket is a pricey $40, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestra start their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Club, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows, instruments, and other equipment to produce even richer tones for songs.

    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surround them, and play three songs; “Lassus Viola,” composed by Mr. Henry Fillmore, arranged by Mr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Mr. Robert W. Smith, and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Mr. Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arranged by Mrs. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound effect as the Orchestra plays their festive carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, all members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.”


    During the concert, not only will guests be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three orchestras and allow the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.



    The Hutchins Consort, a professional violin octet ensemble, will be making a visit to the dinner to play a few songs. Despite the appearances of the instruments, all musicians in the Hutchins Consort play a modified version of the violin. The octet of violins has a range of instruments from high to low, and covers all the lost tones in traditional string instruments. The violin octet includes:the [space between colon and "the"] treble violin and the soprano violin, both of which are tuned higher than a traditional violin, a mezzo violin, which creates the same sound as a traditional violin, alto violin, which replaces the viola, the tenor violin, which fills the gap left between the cello and the viola, baritone violin, which replaces the cello, and two bass violins named the bass violin and the contra bass violin. [too many commas, use some semi-colons] The Hutchins Consort is known for touching their audience and leaving a lasting impression with their tone and sound, [end sentence here] and so all diners will be extrememly [extremely] blessed to be able to listen to the rich sounds of a violin octet.


    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is festive and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it disentangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent of our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    ChristinaZhou

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  ChristinaZhou on Tue Feb 09, 2010 11:13 am

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner is for you.

    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque du Orch,” or “Circus Orchestra.” However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the “Circus Orchestra” will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and guest performers, the Hutchins Consort.

    Although the entrance ticket is a pricey $40, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestra start their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Club, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows, instruments, and other equipment to produce even richer tones for songs.

    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surround them, and play three songs; “Lassus Viola,” composed by Mr. Henry Fillmore, arranged by Mr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Mr. Robert W. Smith, and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Mr. Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arranged by Mrs. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound effect as the Orchestra plays their festive carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, all members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.”


    During the concert, not only will guests be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three orchestras and allow the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.

    The Hutchins Consort, a professional violin octet ensemble, will be making a visit to the dinner to play a few songs. Despite the appearances of the instruments, all musicians in the Hutchins Consort play a modified version of the violin. The octet of violins has a range of instruments from high to low, and covers all the lost tones in traditional string instruments. The violin octet includes: the treble violin and the soprano violin, both of which are tuned higher than a traditional violin; a mezzo violin, which creates the same sound as a traditional violin; alto violin, which replaces the viola; the tenor violin, which fills the gap left between the cello and the viola; baritone violin, which replaces the cello; and two bass violins named the bass violin and the contra bass violin. The Hutchins Consort is known for touching their audience and leaving a lasting impression with their tone and sound. And all diners will be extremely blessed to be able to listen to the rich sounds of a violin octet.

    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is festive and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it disentangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent of our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    ChristinaZhou

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  ChristinaZhou on Tue Feb 09, 2010 11:19 am

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner is for you.

    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque du Orch,” or “Circus Orchestra.” However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the “Circus Orchestra” will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and guest performers, the Hutchins Consort.

    Although the entrance ticket is a pricey $40, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestra start their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Club, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows, instruments, and other equipment to produce even richer tones for songs.

    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surround them, and play three songs; “Lassus Viola,” composed by Mr. Henry Fillmore, arranged by Mr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Mr. Robert W. Smith, and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Mr. Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arranged by Mrs. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound effect as the Orchestra plays their festive carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, all members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.”

    During the concert, not only will guests be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three orchestras and allow the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.

    The Hutchins Consort, a professional violin octet ensemble, will be making a visit to the dinner to play a few songs. Despite the appearances of the instruments, all musicians in the Hutchins Consort play a modified version of the violin. The octet of violins has a range of instruments from high to low, and covers all the lost tones in traditional string instruments. Known for touching their audience and leaving a lasting impression with their tone and sound, the Hutchins Consort will surely amaze all diners with the rich sounds of a violin octet.

    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is festive and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it disentangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent of our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    ChristinaZhou

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Final.

    Post  ChristinaZhou on Tue Feb 09, 2010 11:34 am

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner is for you.
    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque du Orch,” or “Circus Orchestra.” However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the “Circus Orchestra” will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and guest performers, the Hutchins Consort.
    Although the entrance ticket is a pricey $40, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestra start their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Club, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows, instruments, and other equipment to produce even richer tones for songs.
    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surround them, and play three songs; “Lassus Viola,” composed by Mr. Henry Fillmore, arranged by Mr. Rick England, “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Mr. Robert W. Smith, and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Mr. Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arranged by Mrs. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound effect as the Orchestra plays their festive carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.”
    During the concert, not only will guests be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three orchestras and allow the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.
    The Hutchins Consort, a professional violin octet ensemble, will be making a visit to the dinner to play a few songs. Despite the appearances of the instruments, all musicians in the Hutchins Consort play a modified version of the violin. With their range of instruments from high to low, and covers the missing chords in traditional string instruments. Known for touching their audience and leaving a lasting impression with their tone and sound, the Hutchins Consort will surely amaze all guests.
    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is festive and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it disentangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent of our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Orchestra Benefit Dinner

    Post  reginaliu on Tue Feb 09, 2010 12:22 pm

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner is for you.
    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque du Orch,” or “Circus Orchestra.” However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the “Circus Orchestra” will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and guest performers, the Hutchins Consort [and a guest performance by the Hutchins Consort].
    Although the entrance ticket is a pricey $40, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestra start [starts] their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Club, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows, instruments, and other equipment to produce even richer tones for songs.
    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surround them, and play three songs; “Lassus Viola,” composed by Mr. Henry Fillmore, arranged by Mr. Rick England,[;] “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Mr. Robert W. Smith,[;] and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Mr. Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arranged by Mrs. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound effect as the Orchestra plays their festive carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.”
    During the concert, not only will guests be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all three [3; use numerical form to keep it consistent in this sentence] orchestras and allow the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.
    The Hutchins Consort, a professional violin octet ensemble, will be making a visit to the dinner to play a few songs. Despite the appearances of the instruments, all musicians in the Hutchins Consort play a modified version of the violin. With their range of instruments from high to low, and [add a subject and delete "and"] covers the missing chords in traditional string instruments. Known for touching their audience and leaving a lasting impression with their tone and sound, the Hutchins Consort will surely amaze all guests.
    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is festive and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it disentangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent of our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

    ChristinaZhou

    Posts : 79
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    RAWRR. FINAL FINAL FINAL.

    Post  ChristinaZhou on Tue Feb 09, 2010 11:01 pm

    If cherishing the delicate tones of orchestral music while savoring a delectable three course meal is your ideal way to relax during the weekend, then Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner is for you.
    This Saturday, Feb. 27, all Orchestra members will be showcasing their talent as they perform for their audience inside the Arcadia Community Center. The performance is themed “Cirque du Orch,” or “Circus Orchestra.” However, instead of creepy, peppy clowns with ugly red noses attempting to entertain, the “Circus Orchestra” will ease the audience with a melodious four hour long concert, including a dinner, a silent auction, and a guest performance by the Hutchins Consort.
    Although the entrance ticket is a pricey $40, it will prove itself to be well spent when the Orchestra starts their performance. Freshman first chair violinist Nicole Kim said, “I think the fact that students have put in so much effort in making beautiful music makes [the cost] worth every penny. The whole experience itself is worthwhile.” All the money from the Orchestra’s Benefit Dinner will be donated to the Arcadia Music Club, which will, in turn, help Orchestra purchase new bows, instruments, and other equipment to produce even richer tones for songs.
    At one point in the show, all three orchestras will ‘raid’ the audience, surround them, and play three songs; “Lassus Viola,” composed by Mr. Henry Fillmore, arranged by Mr. Rick England; “Elephas Maximus,” composed by Mr. Robert W. Smith; and “Dance of the Tumblers,” composed by Mr. Nikolay Rimsy-Korsakoff, arranged by Mrs. Sandra Dackow. The enclosing of the audience is to create a surround-sound effect as the Orchestra plays their festive carnival songs. Orchestras usually have the luxury to sit with a music stand before them, but our Orchestra won’t. Standing up all around and between the tables, members of the Orchestra department will have to play the three pieces from memory. “I’m really nervous,” freshman Kevin Kha said, “This is the first time I have to memorize three songs and perform them to a large crowd, so I’d naturally be a bit shaky.”
    During the concert, not only will guests be able to listen to the three orchestras play as a whole, but will be able to listen to specially picked student ensembles. The 11 ensembles include 39 members from all3 orchestras and allow the students to shine in their limelight as they play their chosen songs.
    The Hutchins Consort, a professional violin octet ensemble, will be making a visit to the dinner to play a few songs. Despite the appearances of the instruments, all musicians in the Hutchins Consort play a modified version of the violin. With their range of instruments from high to low, the violin octet covers the missing chords in traditional string instruments. Known for touching their audience and leaving a lasting impression with their tone and sound, the Hutchins Consort will surely amaze all guests.
    The Orchestra Benefit Dinner is the best way to quench your thirst for classical music. The theme is festive and the music soothes your mind, allowing your mind to take a journey while it disentangles itself from all stresses. The student ensembles showcase the talent of our fellow peers, and the silent auction is a great way to snag a couple of gifts. Not only is the money benefiting a great program, but you get to enjoy a relaxing concert from your friends.

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