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    justinpark

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-09-02
    Age : 22

    Station Fire

    Post  justinpark on Wed Sep 09, 2009 4:20 pm

    California Wildfires Burn throughout Southern California (ROUGH DRAFT)
    By Evan Delgado and Justin Park

    Over the past month, wild fires have raged across California, consuming hundreds of thousands of acres, destroying homes, and taking the lives of two firemen. By far the largest of these fires was the Station Fire which started on August 26 and grew to an astonishing size of 150,000 acres, making it the largest fire in LA County Modern history. The wildfires arrived earlier than expected, in august rather than October.
    The earliest fire was thought to have begun in the Angeles National Forest near Morris Dam on the 25th of August as a result of either arson or negligence. The Morris Fire burned 2,168 acres before being successfully contained September 3. A day after the Morris Fire began, the Station Fire started in the Angeles National Forest near mile marker 29 on the Angeles Crest Freeway and was also believed to be arson. The Station fire spread unusually fast without the help of the hot and dry Santa Ana winds that are known to occur in October. The fire first reached La Cañada Flintridge from the Angeles Crest Freeway, and on August 29th split, heading for Altadena and west towards Briggs Terrace and Crescenta Valley. Briggs Terrace was nearly surrounded by the fierce flames and the radio towers on Mt. Lukens were threatened. Three days later, the fire headed northwest towards other communities. As the fire approached Tujunga, LA County Sheriff Deputies evacuated homes along the hillside. The fire gradually started to be contained by the efforts of the firefighters.

    On September 2, a tragedy occurred. Firefighters Ted Hall and Arnie Quinones lost their lives while fighting the Station Fire when their truck careened down a mountain. Firefighters spent their morning on September 4 at the Station Fire Command Station with their heads bowed down in remembrance of their fallen comrades Hall and Quinones, sharing stories of their memories with their friends. These wildfires have taken so much from so many people in a matter of days. Homes lay in charred piles of wood and memories while massive sums of money have been spent on containment and evacuation efforts. The fires were distinguishable by the massive, foreboding plumes of smoke, which caused many to fear the possibility of the fire endangering their homes. Although by September 6th the fire had begun to be contained, it had already done more damage than any other fire in LA County. The Fire even burned a quarter of the Angeles National Forest, closing it indefinitely and leftswaths of forest burned to a crisp. People in the area have mourned the amazing natural wonders which have been destroyed and the escapism it offered from the big city.

    As the fire spread and threatened many communities, Firefighters employed many of their various techniques to contain the blaze. In addition to using water, seeking out “hotspots”, and attempting to smother the fire with materials dropped from helicopters and planes, they used the tactic of fighting fire with fire. Although it is risky, this technique had high results, and helped contain the fire by burning out certain areas with controlled blazes so the main fires would be stopped in their tracks. Fighting the fire did not come without cost however. By early September, the fire had cost the government of California over 43 million dollars. Although the fire no longer posed a threat to homes as of September 7th, it was still blazing through the San Gabriel. Although the fire effort was costly, it was essential. Although two brave firefighters gave their lives, there were no civilian fatalities.


    Arrow lol!

    justinpark

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-09-02
    Age : 22

    Re: Station Fire

    Post  justinpark on Wed Sep 09, 2009 11:10 pm

    California Wildfires Burn throughout Southern California
    (written in past tense)
    By Evan Delgado and Justin Park

    Over the past month, wildfires have raged across California, consuming hundreds of thousands of acres, destroying homes, and taking the lives of two valiant firemen. By far the largest of these fires was the Station Fire which started on August 26 and grew to an astonishing size of 150,000 acres, making it the largest fire in LA County Modern history. The wildfires this year arrived earlier than the expected fire season.

    The earliest fire was thought to have begun in the Angeles National Forest near Morris Dam on the 25th of August as a result of either arson or negligence. The Morris Fire burned 2,168 acres before being successfully contained September 3. A day after the Morris Fire began, the Station Fire started in the Angeles National Forest near mile marker 29 on the Angeles Crest Freeway and was also believed to be arson. The Station fire spread unusually fast without the help of the hot and dry Santa Ana winds that are known to occur in October. The fire first reached La Cañada Flintridge from the Angeles Crest Freeway, and on August 29th split, heading for Altadena and west towards Briggs Terrace and Crescenta Valley. Briggs Terrace was nearly surrounded by the fierce flames and the radio towers on Mt. Lukens were threatened. Three days later, the fire headed northwest towards other communities. As the fire approached Tujunga, LA County Sheriff Deputies evacuated homes along the hillside. The fire gradually started to be contained by the efforts of the firefighters.

    On September 2, a tragedy occurred. Firefighters Ted Hall and Arnie Quinones lost their lives while fighting the Station Fire when their truck careened down a mountain. Firefighters spent their morning on September 4 at the Station Fire Command Station with their heads bowed down in remembrance of their fallen comrades Hall and Quinones, sharing stories of their memories with their friends. These wildfires have taken so much from so many people in a matter of days. Homes lay in charred piles of wood and memories while massive sums of money have been spent on containment and evacuation efforts. The fires were distinguishable by the massive, foreboding plumes of smoke, which caused many to fear the possibility of the fire endangering their homes.

    Although by September 6, the fire had begun to be contained. It had already done more damage than any other fire in LA County. The Fire even burned a quarter of the Angeles National Forest, closing it indefinitely leaving acres of forest burned to a crisp. Because the Angeles National Forest was endangered, officials were forced to move wildlife away from the area. This process definitely wasn’t an easy task when there were hundreds of wild animals that needed relocating. People in the area have mourned for the amazing natural wonders which have been destroyed and the escapism it offered from the big city.

    As the fire spread and threatened many communities, Firefighters employed many of their various techniques to contain the blaze. In addition to using water, seeking out “hotspots”, and attempting to smother the fire with materials dropped from helicopters and planes, they used the tactic of fighting fire with fire. Although it is risky, this technique had high results, and helped contain the fire by burning out certain areas with controlled blazes so the main fires would be stopped in their tracks. Fighting the fire did not come without cost however. By early September, the fire had cost the government of California over 43 million dollars and had cost us two American firefighters. Although the fire no longer posed a threat to homes as of September 7, it was still blazing through the San Gabriel Mountains. Without doubt, the fire effort was costly, especially in the state of our economy, but nevertheless, it was essential.

    Students at Arcadia High School weren’t in danger of the raging inferno but still felt the effects of the fire in their daily lives. Ashes polluted the air in the vast swaths of land surrounding the fire site. They posed a threat to students’ health, and especially to those with breathing disorders (such as asthma). P.E. and sports were put on hold to protect the students from inhaling the too much of the ash ridden air. In addition to the danger, the fire also had a psychological effect. Families in Arcadia feared that the fire would move in the direction of Arcadia, endangering their homes. Numerous communities around Arcadia were forced to evacuate which elevated the fear factor. The Station Fire along with several other fires had indeed slightly altered the lives of Southern Californians. Although this was one of the largest wildfires in the history of LA County, it was eventually brought to justice by the combined effort of firefighters and law enforcement.



    cheers bounce lol!

    justinpark

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-09-02
    Age : 22

    Re: Station Fire

    Post  justinpark on Thu Sep 10, 2009 11:42 am

    California Wildfires Burn throughout Southern California
    (written in past tense without quotes)
    By Evan Delgado and Justin Park

    Over the past month, wildfires have raged across California, consuming hundreds of thousands of
    acres, destroying homes, and taking the lives of two valiant firemen. By far the largest of these fires was the Station Fire which started on August 26 which grew to be the largest fire in LA County Modern history. The fires affected Arcadia and other communities close to them. Fires this year arrived earlier than California’s expected fire season.

    Students at Arcadia High School weren’t in direct danger of the raging inferno but still felt the effects of the fire in their daily lives. Ashes polluted the air in the vast swaths of land surrounding the fire site. They posed a threat to students’ health, and especially to those with breathing disorders (such as asthma). P.E. and sports were put on hold to protect the students from inhaling the too much of the ash ridden air. In addition to the danger, the fire also had a psychological effect. Families in Arcadia feared that the fire would move in the direction of Arcadia, endangering their homes. There were already numerous communities around Arcadia that were forced to evacuate which elevated the fear factor. The Station Fire along with several other fires had indeed slightly altered the lives of Southern Californians.

    The earliest fire was thought to have begun in the Angeles National Forest near Morris Dam on the 25th of August as a result of either arson or negligence. This fire was named the Morris Fire which burned 2,168 acres before being successfully contained September 3. A day after the Morris Fire began, the Station Fire started in the Angeles National Forest which is about 35 miles from Arcadia. The Station Fire was also believed to be arson. The Fire spread unusually quickly without the help of the hot and dry Santa Ana winds that are known to occur in October. The fire first reached La Cañada Flintridge from the Angeles Crest Freeway, and on August 29th split, heading for Altadena and west towards Briggs Terrace and Crescenta Valley. Briggs Terrace was nearly surrounded by the fierce flames and the radio towers on Mt. Lukens were threatened. Three days later, the fire headed northwest towards other communities. As the fire approached Tujunga, LA County Sheriff Deputies evacuated homes along the hillside. The fire gradually started to be contained by the efforts of the firefighters.

    Although by September 6, the fire had begun to be contained. It had already done more damage than any other fire in LA County. The Fire even burned a quarter of the Angeles National Forest, closing it indefinitely leaving acres of forest burned to a crisp. Because the Angeles National Forest was endangered, officials were forced to move wildlife away from the area. This process definitely wasn’t an easy task when there were hundreds of wild animals that needed relocating. People in the area have mourned for the amazing natural wonders which have been destroyed and the escapism it offered from the big city.

    As the fire spread and threatened many communities, firefighters employed many of their various techniques to contain the blaze. In addition to using water, seeking out “hotspots,” and attempting to smother the fire with materials dropped from helicopters and planes, they used the tactic of fighting fire with fire. Although it is risky, this technique had high results, and helped contain the fire by burning out certain areas with controlled blazes so the main fires would be stopped in their tracks. Fighting the fire did not come without cost however. By early September, the fire had cost the government of California over 43 million dollars and had cost us two American firefighters. Although the fire no longer posed a threat to homes as of September 7, it was still blazing through the San Gabriel Mountains. Without doubt, the fire effort was costly, especially in the state of our economy, but nevertheless, it was essential.

    On September 2, a tragedy occurred. Firefighters Ted Hall and Arnie Quinones lost their lives while fighting the Station Fire when their truck careened down a mountain. Firefighters spent their morning on September 4 at the Station Fire Command Station with their heads bowed down in remembrance of their fallen comrades Hall and Quinones, sharing stories of their memories with their friends. These wildfires have taken so much from so many people in a matter of days. Homes lay in charred piles of wood and memories while massive sums of money have been spent on containment and evacuation efforts. The fires were distinguishable by the massive, foreboding plumes of smoke, which caused many to fear the possibility of the fire endangering their homes. Although this was one of the largest wildfires in the history of LA County, it was eventually brought to justice by the combined effort of firefighters and law enforcement.


    bounce bounce bounce bounce bounce bounce Wink

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Station Fire

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Fri Sep 11, 2009 1:29 am

    California Wildfires Burn throughout Southern California
    (written in past tense without quotes)
    By Evan Delgado and Justin Park

    Over the past month, wildfires have raged across California,[no comma] consuming hundreds of thousands of acres, destroying homes, and taking the lives of two valiant firemen. By far [add comma] the largest of these fires was the Station Fire [add period]which [new sentence: replace "which" with "It"]started on August 26 [add comma] which [replace "which" "and"] grew to be the largest fire in LA County Modern history. The fires affected Arcadia and other communities close to them. Fires this year arrived earlier than California’s expected fire season.

    Students at Arcadia High School weren’t in direct danger of the raging inferno but still felt the effects of the fire in their daily lives. Ashes polluted the air in the vast swaths of land surrounding the fire site. They posed a threat to students’ health, and especially to those with breathing disorders (such as asthma). P.E. and sports were put on hold to protect the students from inhaling the too much of the ash ridden air. In addition to the danger, the fire also had a psychological effect. Families in Arcadia feared that the fire would move in the direction of Arcadia, endangering their homes. There were already numerous communities around Arcadia that were forced to evacuate which elevated the fear factor. The Station Fire [add comma] along with several other fires [add comma] had indeed slightly altered the lives of Southern Californians.

    The earliest fire was thought to have begun in the Angeles National Forest near Morris Dam on the 25th of August as a result of either arson or negligence. This fire was named the Morris Fire which burned 2,168 acres before being successfully contained September 3 [on September 3rd].A day after the Morris Fire began, the Station Fire started in the Angeles National Forest which is about 35 miles from Arcadia. The Station Fire was also believed to be arson. The Fire spread unusually quickly without the help of the hot and dry Santa Ana winds that are known to occur in October. The fire first reached La Cañada Flintridge from the Angeles Crest Freeway, and on August 29th split, heading for Altadena and west towards Briggs Terrace and Crescenta Valley. Briggs Terrace was nearly surrounded by the fierce flames and the radio towers on Mt. Lukens were threatened. Three days later, the fire headed northwest towards other communities. As the fire approached Tujunga, LA County Sheriff Deputies evacuated homes along the hillside. The fire gradually started to be contained by the efforts of the firefighters.

    Although by September 6, the fire had begun to be contained. It had already done more damage than any other fire in LA County. The Fire even burned a quarter of the Angeles National Forest, closing it indefinitely leaving acres of forest burned to a crisp. Because the Angeles National Forest was endangered, officials were forced to move wildlife away from the area. This process definitely wasn’t an easy task when there were hundreds of wild animals that needed relocating. People in the area have mourned for the amazing natural wonders which have been destroyed and the escapism it offered from the big city.

    As the fire spread and threatened many communities, firefighters employed many of their various techniques to contain the blaze. In addition to using water, seeking out “hotspots,” and attempting to smother the fire with materials dropped from helicopters and planes, they used the tactic of fighting fire with fire. Although it is risky, this technique had high results, and helped contain the fire by burning out certain areas with controlled blazes so the main fires would be stopped in their tracks. Fighting the fire did not come without cost however [,however]. By early September, the fire had cost the government of California over 43 million dollars and had cost us two American firefighters. Although the fire no longer posed a threat to homes as of September 7 [7th], it was still blazing through the San Gabriel Mountains. Without doubt, the fire effort was costly, especially in the state of our economy, but nevertheless, it was essential.

    On September 2 [2nd], a tragedy occurred. Firefighters Ted Hall and Arnie Quinones lost their lives while fighting the Station Fire when their truck careened down a mountain. Firefighters spent their morning on September 4 [4th] at the Station Fire Command Station with their heads bowed down in remembrance of their fallen comrades [,] Hall and Quinones, sharing stories of their memories with their friends. These wildfires have taken so much from so many people in a matter of days. Homes lay in charred piles of wood and memories while massive sums of money have been spent on containment and evacuation efforts. The fires were distinguishable by the massive, foreboding plumes of smoke, which caused many to fear the possibility of the fire endangering their homes. Although this was one of the largest wildfires in the history of LA County, it was eventually brought to justice by the combined effort of firefighters and law enforcement.

    evandelgado

    Posts : 47
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Station Fire

    Post  evandelgado on Mon Sep 14, 2009 12:53 am

    California Burnin’ (rough)
    by Evan Delgado and Justin Park
    Over the past month, wildfires have raged across California, consuming hundreds of thousands of acres, destroying homes, and taking the lives of two valiant firemen. By far, the largest of these fires was the Station Fire. It started on August 26, and grew to be the largest fire in LA County Modern history. The fires affected Arcadia and other communities close to them. Fires this year arrived earlier than California’s expected fire season.

    Students at Arcadia High School weren’t in direct danger of the raging inferno but still felt the effects of the fire in their daily lives. Ashes polluted the air in the vast swaths of land surrounding the fire site. They posed a threat to students’ health, and especially to those with breathing disorders (such as asthma). P.E. and sports were put on hold to protect the students from inhaling the too much of the ash ridden air. In addition to the danger, the fire also had a psychological effect. Families in Arcadia feared that the fire would move in the direction of Arcadia, endangering their homes. There were already numerous communities around Arcadia that were forced to evacuate which elevated the fear factor. The Station Fire, along with several other fires, had indeed slightly altered the lives of Southern Californians.

    The earliest fire was thought to have begun in the Angeles National Forest near Morris Dam on the 25th of August as a result of either arson or negligence. This fire was named the Morris Fire which burned 2,168 acres before being successfully contained September 3rd. A day after the Morris Fire began, the Station Fire started in the Angeles National Forest which is about 35 miles from Arcadia. The Station Fire was also believed to be arson. The Fire spread unusually quickly without the help of the hot and dry Santa Ana winds that are known to occur in October. The fire first reached La Cañada Flintridge from the Angeles Crest Freeway, and on August 29th split, heading for Altadena and west towards Briggs Terrace and Crescenta Valley. Briggs Terrace was nearly surrounded by the fierce flames and the radio towers on Mt. Lukens were threatened. Three days later, the fire headed northwest towards other communities. As the fire approached Tujunga, LA County Sheriff Deputies evacuated homes along the hillside. The fire gradually started to be contained by the efforts of the firefighters.

    Although by September 6, the fire had begun to be contained. It had already done more damage than any other fire in LA County. The Fire even burned a quarter of the Angeles National Forest, closing it indefinitely leaving acres of forest burned to a crisp. Because the Angeles National Forest was endangered, officials were forced to move wildlife away from the area. This process definitely wasn’t an easy task when there were hundreds of wild animals that needed relocating. People in the area have mourned for the amazing natural wonders which have been destroyed and the escapism it offered from the big city. As the fire continued, the Arcadia Fire Department sent two crews to assist with the fire effort. “Whenever there’s a big fire, we always send men over there,” Arcadia fireman Joe Augino said.

    As the fire spread and threatened many communities, firefighters employed many of their various techniques to contain the blaze. In addition to using water, seeking out “hotspots,” and attempting to smother the fire with materials dropped from helicopters and planes, they used the tactic of fighting fire with fire. Although it is risky, this technique had high results, and helped contain the fire by burning out certain areas with controlled blazes so the main fires would be stopped in their tracks. Fighting the fire did not come without cost, however by early September, the fire had cost the government of California over 80 million dollars and had cost us two firefighters. Although the fire no longer posed a threat to homes, as of September 7th it was still blazing through the San Gabriel Mountains. Without doubt, the fire effort was costly, especially in the state of our economy, but nevertheless, it was essential.

    On September 2nd, a tragedy occurred. Firefighters Ted Hall and Arnie Quinones lost their lives while fighting the Station Fire when their truck careened down a mountain. Firefighters spent their morning on September 4th at the Station Fire Command Station with their heads bowed down in remembrance of their fallen comrades, Hall and Quinones, sharing stories of their memories with their friends. These wildfires have taken so much from so many people in a matter of days. “I’ve been in brushfires where I’ve had fires literally all around me and you don’t realize the magnitude of what you were just in the middle of until you’re done.” firemen Joe Augino and Taylor Byars mentioned. Homes lay in charred piles of wood and memories while massive sums of money have been spent on containment and evacuation efforts. The fires were distinguishable by the massive, foreboding plumes of smoke, which caused many to fear the possibility of the fire endangering their homes. Although this was one of the largest wildfires in the history of LA County, it was eventually brought to justice by the combined effort of firefighters and law enforcement.
    Cool

    (going to add another quote)

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Station Fire

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Mon Sep 14, 2009 11:05 pm

    California Burnin’ (rough)
    by Evan Delgado and Justin Park
    Over the past month, wildfires have raged across California, consuming hundreds of thousands of acres, destroying homes, and taking the lives of two valiant firemen. By far, the largest of these fires was the Station Fire. It started on August 26, and grew to be the largest fire in LA County Modern history. The fires affected Arcadia and other communities close to them. Fires this year arrived earlier than California’s expected fire season.

    Students at Arcadia High School weren’t in direct danger of the raging inferno but still felt the effects of the fire in their daily lives. Ashes polluted the air in the vast swaths of land surrounding the fire site. They posed a threat to students’ health, and especially to those with breathing disorders (such as asthma). P.E. and sports were put on hold to protect the students from inhaling the too much of the ash ridden air. In addition to the danger, the fire also had a psychological effect. Families in Arcadia feared that the fire would move in the direction of Arcadia, endangering their homes. There were already numerous communities around Arcadia that were forced to evacuate which elevated the fear factor. The Station Fire, along with several other fires, had indeed slightly altered the lives of Southern Californians.

    The earliest fire was thought to have begun in the Angeles National Forest near Morris Dam on the 25th of August as a result of either arson or negligence. This fire was named the Morris Fire which burned 2,168 acres before being successfully contained September 3rd. A day after the Morris Fire began, the Station Fire started in the Angeles National Forest which is about 35 miles from Arcadia. The Station Fire was also believed to be arson. The Fire spread unusually quickly without the help of the hot and dry Santa Ana winds that are known to occur in October. The fire first reached La Cañada Flintridge from the Angeles Crest Freeway, and on August 29th [,it] split, [delete comma] heading for Altadena and west towards Briggs Terrace and Crescenta Valley. Briggs Terrace was nearly surrounded by the fierce flames and the radio towers on Mt. Lukens were threatened. Three days later, the fire headed northwest towards other communities. As the fire approached Tujunga, LA County Sheriff Deputies evacuated homes along the hillside. The fire gradually started to be contained by the efforts of the firefighters.

    Although[,] by September 6, the fire had begun to be contained. It had already done more damage than any other fire in LA County. The Fire even burned a quarter of the Angeles National Forest, closing it indefinitely leaving acres of forest burned to a crisp. Because the Angeles National Forest was endangered, officials were forced to move wildlife away from the area. This process definitely wasn’t an easy task when there were hundreds of wild animals that needed relocating. People in the area have mourned for the amazing natural wonders which have been destroyed and the escapism it offered from the big city. As the fire continued, the Arcadia Fire Department sent two crews to assist with the fire effort. “Whenever there’s a big fire, we always send men over there,” Arcadia fireman Joe Augino said.

    As the fire spread and threatened many communities, firefighters employed many of their various techniques to contain the blaze. In addition to using water, seeking out “hotspots,” and attempting to smother the fire with materials dropped from helicopters and planes, they used the tactic of fighting fire with fire. Although it is risky, this technique had high results, and helped contain the fire by burning out certain areas with controlled blazes so the main fires would be stopped in their tracks. Fighting the fire did not come without cost, however by early September, the fire had cost the government of California over 80 million dollars and had cost us two firefighters. Although the fire no longer posed a threat to homes, as of September 7th it was still blazing through the San Gabriel Mountains. Without doubt, the fire effort was costly, especially in the state of our economy, but nevertheless, it was essential.

    On September 2nd, a tragedy occurred. Firefighters Ted Hall and Arnie Quinones lost their lives while fighting the Station Fire when their truck careened down a mountain. Firefighters spent their morning on September 4th at the Station Fire Command Station with their heads bowed down in remembrance of their fallen comrades, Hall and Quinones, sharing stories of their memories with their friends. These wildfires have taken so much from so many people in a matter of days. “I’ve been in brushfires where I’ve had fires literally all around me and you don’t realize the magnitude of what you were just in the middle of until you’re done.” firemen Joe Augino and Taylor Byars mentioned. Homes lay in charred piles of wood and memories while massive sums of money have been spent on containment and evacuation efforts. The fires were distinguishable by the massive, foreboding plumes of smoke, which caused many to fear the possibility of the fire endangering their homes. Although this was one of the largest wildfires in the history of LA County, it was eventually brought to justice by the combined effort of firefighters and law enforcement.

    evandelgado

    Posts : 47
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Final

    Post  evandelgado on Tue Sep 15, 2009 1:10 am

    California Burnin’
    by Evan Delgado and Justin Park
    Over the past month, wildfires have raged across California, consuming hundreds of thousands of acres, destroying homes, and taking the lives of two valiant firemen. By far, the largest of these fires was the Station Fire. It started on August 26, and grew to be the largest fire in LA County Modern history. The fires affected Arcadia and other communities close to them. Fires this year arrived earlier than California’s expected fire season.

    Students at Arcadia High School weren’t in direct danger of the raging inferno but still felt the effects of the fire in their daily lives. Ashes polluted the air in the vast swaths of land surrounding the fire site. They posed a threat to students’ health, and especially to those with breathing disorders (such as asthma). P.E. and sports were put on hold to protect the students from inhaling the too much of the ash ridden air. In addition to the danger, the fire also had a psychological effect. Families in Arcadia feared that the fire would move in the direction of Arcadia, endangering their homes. There were already numerous communities around Arcadia that were forced to evacuate which elevated the fear factor. The Station Fire, along with several other fires, had indeed slightly altered the lives of Southern Californians.

    The earliest fire was thought to have begun in the Angeles National Forest near Morris Dam on the 25th of August as a result of either arson or negligence. This fire was named the Morris Fire which burned 2,168 acres before being successfully contained September 3rd. A day after the Morris Fire began, the Station Fire started in the Angeles National Forest which is about 35 miles from Arcadia. The Station Fire was also believed to be arson. The Fire spread unusually quickly without the help of the hot and dry Santa Ana winds that are known to occur in October. The fire first reached La Cañada Flintridge from the Angeles Crest Freeway, and on August 29th it split heading for Altadena and west towards Briggs Terrace and Crescenta Valley. Briggs Terrace was nearly surrounded by the fierce flames and the radio towers on Mt. Lukens were threatened. Three days later, the fire headed northwest towards other communities. As the fire approached Tujunga, LA County Sheriff Deputies evacuated homes along the hillside. The fire gradually started to be contained by the efforts of the firefighters.

    Although by September 6, the fire had begun to be contained. It had already done more damage than any other fire in LA County. The Fire even burned a quarter of the Angeles National Forest, closing it indefinitely leaving acres of forest burned to a crisp. Because the Angeles National Forest was endangered, officials were forced to move wildlife away from the area. This process definitely wasn’t an easy task when there were hundreds of wild animals that needed relocating. People in the area have mourned for the amazing natural wonders which have been destroyed and the escapism it offered from the big city. As the fire continued, the Arcadia Fire Department sent two crews to assist with the fire effort. “Whenever there’s a big fire, we always send men over there,” Arcadia fireman Joe Augino said.

    As the fire spread and threatened many communities, firefighters employed many of their various techniques to contain the blaze. In addition to using water, seeking out “hotspots,” and attempting to smother the fire with materials dropped from helicopters and planes, they used the tactic of fighting fire with fire. Although it is risky, this technique had high results, and helped contain the fire by burning out certain areas with controlled blazes so the main fires would be stopped in their tracks. Fighting the fire did not come without cost, however by early September, the fire had cost the government of California over 80 million dollars and had cost us two firefighters. Although the fire no longer posed a threat to homes, as of September 7th it was still blazing through the San Gabriel Mountains. Without doubt, the fire effort was costly, especially in the state of our economy, but nevertheless, it was essential.

    On September 2nd, a tragedy occurred. Firefighters Ted Hall and Arnie Quinones lost their lives while fighting the Station Fire when their truck careened down a mountain. Firefighters spent their morning on September 4th at the Station Fire Command Station with their heads bowed down in remembrance of their fallen comrades, Hall and Quinones, sharing stories of their memories with their friends. These wildfires have taken so much from so many people in a matter of days. “I’ve been in brushfires where I’ve had fires literally all around me and you don’t realize the magnitude of what you were just in the middle of until you’re done.” firemen Joe Augino and Taylor Byars mentioned. Homes lay in charred piles of wood and memories while massive sums of money have been spent on containment and evacuation efforts. The fires were distinguishable by the massive, foreboding plumes of smoke, which caused many to fear the possibility of the fire endangering their homes. Beth Stogner from the Arcadia Fire Station stated on September 10th, “The fire as of today is 71% contained, and has burned a little over 160,000 acres.” Although this was one of the largest wildfires in the history of LA County, it was eventually brought to justice by the combined effort of firefighters and law enforcement after being driven away from people’s homes.

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Station Fire

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Tue Sep 15, 2009 9:44 pm

    California Burnin’
    by Evan Delgado and Justin Park
    Over the past month, wildfires have raged across California, consuming hundreds of thousands of acres, destroying homes, and taking the lives of two valiant firemen. By far, the largest of these fires was the Station Fire. It started on August 26, and grew to be the largest fire in LA County Modern history. The fires affected Arcadia and other communities close to them. Fires this year arrived earlier than California’s expected fire season.

    Students at Arcadia High School weren’t in direct danger of the raging inferno but still felt the effects of the fire in their daily lives. Ashes polluted the air in the vast swaths of land surrounding the fire site. They posed a threat to students’ health, and especially to those with breathing disorders (such as asthma). P.E. and sports were put on hold to protect the students from inhaling the too much of the ash ridden air. In addition to the danger, the fire also had a psychological effect. Families in Arcadia feared that the fire would move in the direction of Arcadia, endangering their homes. There were already numerous communities around Arcadia that were forced to evacuate which elevated the fear factor. The Station Fire, along with several other fires, had indeed slightly altered the lives of Southern Californians.

    The earliest fire was thought to have begun in the Angeles National Forest near Morris Dam on the 25th of August as a result of either arson or negligence. This fire was named the Morris Fire which burned 2,168 acres before being successfully contained September 3rd. A day after the Morris Fire began, the Station Fire started in the Angeles National Forest which is about 35 miles from Arcadia. The Station Fire was also believed to be arson. The Fire spread unusually quickly without the help of the hot and dry Santa Ana winds that are known to occur in October. The fire first reached La Cañada Flintridge from the Angeles Crest Freeway, and on August 29th it split heading for Altadena and west towards Briggs Terrace and Crescenta Valley. Briggs Terrace was nearly surrounded by the fierce flames and the radio towers on Mt. Lukens were threatened. Three days later, the fire headed northwest towards other communities. As the fire approached Tujunga, LA County Sheriff Deputies evacuated homes along the hillside. The fire gradually started to be contained by the efforts of the firefighters.

    Although by September 6, the fire had begun to be contained. It had already done more damage than any other fire in LA County. The Fire even burned a quarter of the Angeles National Forest, closing it indefinitely leaving acres of forest burned to a crisp. Because the Angeles National Forest was endangered, officials were forced to move wildlife away from the area. This process definitely wasn’t an easy task when there were hundreds of wild animals that needed relocating. People in the area have mourned for the amazing natural wonders which have been destroyed and the escapism it offered from the big city. As the fire continued, the Arcadia Fire Department sent two crews to assist with the fire effort. “Whenever there’s a big fire, we always send men over there,” Arcadia fireman Joe Augino said.

    As the fire spread and threatened many communities, firefighters employed many of their various techniques to contain the blaze. In addition to using water, seeking out “hotspots,” and attempting to smother the fire with materials dropped from helicopters and planes, they used the tactic of fighting fire with fire. Although it is risky, this technique had high results, and helped contain the fire by burning out certain areas with controlled blazes so the main fires would be stopped in their tracks. Fighting the fire did not come without cost, however [.] by [By] early September, the fire had cost the government of California over 80 million dollars and had cost us two firefighters. Although the fire no longer posed a threat to homes, as of September 7th it was still blazing through the San Gabriel Mountains. Without doubt, the fire effort was costly, especially in the state of our economy, but nevertheless, it was essential.

    On September 2nd, a tragedy occurred. Firefighters Ted Hall and Arnie Quinones lost their lives while fighting the Station Fire when their truck careened down a mountain. Firefighters spent their morning on September 4th at the Station Fire Command Station with their heads bowed down in remembrance of their fallen comrades, Hall and Quinones, sharing stories of their memories with their friends. These wildfires have taken so much from so many people in a matter of days. “I’ve been in brushfires where I’ve had fires literally all around me and you don’t realize the magnitude of what you were just in the middle of until you’re done.” firemen Joe Augino and Taylor Byars mentioned. Homes lay in charred piles of wood and memories while massive sums of money have been spent on containment and evacuation efforts. The fires were distinguishable by the massive, foreboding plumes of smoke, which caused many to fear the possibility of the fire endangering their homes. Beth Stogner from the Arcadia Fire Station stated on September 10th, “The fire as of today is 71% contained, and has burned a little over 160,000 acres.” Although this was one of the largest wildfires in the history of LA County, it was eventually brought to justice by the combined effort of firefighters and law enforcement after being driven away from people’s homes.

    justinpark

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-09-02
    Age : 22

    Re: Station Fire

    Post  justinpark on Wed Sep 16, 2009 11:41 am

    California Burnin’
    by Evan Delgado and Justin Park

    Over the past month, wildfires have raged across California, consuming hundreds of thousands of acres, destroying homes, and taking the lives of two valiant firemen. By far, the largest of these fires was the Station Fire. It started on Aug. 26, and grew to be the largest fire in LA County Modern history. The fires affected Arcadia and other communities close to them. Fires this year arrived earlier than California’s expected fire season.

    Students at Arcadia High School weren’t in direct danger of the raging inferno but still felt the effects of the fire in their daily lives. Ashes polluted the air in the vast swaths of land surrounding the fire site. They posed a threat to students’ health, and especially to those with breathing disorders (such as asthma). P.E. and sports were put on hold to protect the students from inhaling the too much of the ash ridden air. In addition to the danger, the fire also had a psychological effect. Families in Arcadia feared that the fire would move in the direction of Arcadia, endangering their homes. There were already numerous communities around Arcadia that were forced to evacuate which elevated the fear factor. The Station Fire, along with several other fires, had indeed slightly altered the lives of Southern Californians.

    The earliest fire was thought to have begun in the Angeles National Forest near Morris Dam on Aug. 25 as a result of either arson or negligence. This fire was named the Morris Fire which burned 2,168 acres before being successfully contained Sept. 3. A day after the Morris Fire began, the Station Fire started in the Angeles National Forest which is about 35 miles from Arcadia. The Station Fire was also believed to be arson. The Fire spread unusually quickly without the help of the hot and dry Santa Ana winds that are known to occur in October. The fire first reached La Cañada Flintridge from the Angeles Crest Freeway, and on Aug. 29 it split heading for Altadena and west towards Briggs Terrace and Crescenta Valley. Briggs Terrace was nearly surrounded by the fierce flames and the radio towers on Mt. Lukens were threatened. Three days later, the fire headed northwest towards other communities. As the fire approached Tujunga, LA County Sheriff Deputies evacuated homes along the hillside. The fire gradually started to be contained by the efforts of the firefighters.

    Although by Sept. 6, the fire had begun to be contained. It had already done more damage than any other fire in LA County. The fire even burned a quarter of the Angeles National Forest, closing it indefinitely and leaving acres of forest burned to a crisp. Because the Angeles National Forest was endangered, officials were forced to move wildlife away from the area. This process definitely wasn’t an easy task when there were hundreds of wild animals that needed relocating. People in the area have mourned for the amazing natural wonders which have been destroyed and the escapism it offered from the big city. As the fire continued, the Arcadia Fire Department sent two crews to assist with the fire effort. “Whenever there’s a big fire, we always send men over there,” Arcadia fireman Joe Augino said.

    As the fire spread and threatened many communities, firefighters employed many of their various techniques to contain the blaze. In addition to using water, seeking out “hotspots,” and attempting to smother the fire with materials dropped from helicopters and planes, they used the tactic of fighting fire with fire. Although it is risky, this technique had high results, and helped contain the fire by burning out certain areas with controlled blazes so the main fires would be stopped in their tracks. Fighting the fire did not come without cost. By early September, the fire had cost the government of California over 80 million dollars and had cost us two firefighters. Although the fire no longer posed a threat to homes, as of Sept. 7 it was still blazing through the San Gabriel Mountains. Without doubt, the fire effort was costly, especially in the state of our economy, but nevertheless, it was essential.

    On Sept. 2, a tragedy occurred. Firefighters Ted Hall and Arnie Quinones lost their lives while fighting the Station Fire when their truck careened down a mountain. Firefighters spent their morning on Sept. 4 at the Station Fire Command Station with their heads bowed down in remembrance of their fallen comrades, Hall and Quinones, sharing stories of their memories with their friends. These wildfires have taken so much from so many people in a matter of days. “I’ve been in brushfires where I’ve had fires literally all around me and you don’t realize the magnitude of what you were just in the middle of until you’re done.” firemen Joe Augino and Taylor Byars mentioned. Homes lay in charred piles of wood and memories while massive sums of money have been spent on containment and evacuation efforts. The fires were distinguishable by the massive, foreboding plumes of smoke, which caused many to fear the possibility of the fire endangering their homes. Beth Stogner from the Arcadia Fire Station stated on Sept. 10, “The fire as of today is 71% contained, and has burned a little over 160,000 acres.” Although this was one of the largest wildfires in the history of LA County, it was eventually brought to justice by the combined effort of firefighters and law enforcement after being driven away from people’s homes.

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Station Fire

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Wed Sep 16, 2009 5:15 pm

    California Burnin’
    by Evan Delgado and Justin Park

    Over the past month, wildfires have raged across California, consuming hundreds of thousands of acres, destroying homes, and taking the lives of two valiant firemen. By far, the largest of these fires was the Station Fire. It started on Aug. 26, and grew to be the largest fire in LA County Modern history. The fires affected Arcadia and other communities close to them. Fires this year arrived earlier than California’s expected fire season.

    Students at Arcadia High School weren’t in direct danger of the raging inferno but still felt the effects of the fire in their daily lives. Ashes polluted the air in the vast swaths of land surrounding the fire site. They posed a [as a] threat to students’ health, and especially to those with breathing disorders (such as asthma). P.E. and sports were put on hold to protect the students from inhaling the too much of the ash ridden air. In addition to the danger, the fire also had a psychological effect. Families in Arcadia feared that the fire would move in the direction of Arcadia, endangering their homes. There were already numerous communities around Arcadia that were forced to evacuate which elevated the fear factor. The Station Fire, along with several other fires, had indeed slightly altered the lives of Southern Californians.

    The earliest fire was thought to have begun in the Angeles National Forest near Morris Dam on Aug. 25 as a result of either arson or negligence. This fire was named the Morris Fire which burned 2,168 acres before being successfully contained Sept. 3. A day after the Morris Fire began, the Station Fire started in the Angeles National Forest which is about 35 miles from Arcadia. The Station Fire was also believed to be arson. The Fire [fire] spread unusually quickly without the help of the hot and dry Santa Ana winds that are known to occur in October. The fire first reached La Cañada Flintridge from the Angeles Crest Freeway, and on Aug. 29 it split heading for Altadena and west towards Briggs Terrace and Crescenta Valley. Briggs Terrace was nearly surrounded by the fierce flames and the radio towers on Mt. Lukens were threatened. Three days later, the fire headed northwest towards other communities. As the fire approached Tujunga, LA County Sheriff Deputies evacuated homes along the hillside. The fire gradually started to be contained by the efforts of the firefighters.

    Although by Sept. 6, the fire had begun to be contained. It had already done more damage than any other fire in LA County. The fire even burned a quarter of the Angeles National Forest, closing it indefinitely and leaving acres of forest burned to a crisp. Because the Angeles National Forest was endangered, officials were forced to move wildlife away from the area. This process definitely wasn’t an easy task when there were hundreds of wild animals that needed relocating. People in the area have mourned for the amazing natural wonders which have been destroyed and the escapism it offered from the big city. As the fire continued, the Arcadia Fire Department sent two crews to assist with the fire effort. “Whenever there’s a big fire, we always send men over there,” Arcadia fireman Joe Augino said.

    As the fire spread and threatened many communities, firefighters employed many of their various techniques to contain the blaze. In addition to using water, seeking out “hotspots,” and attempting to smother the fire with materials dropped from helicopters and planes, they used the tactic of fighting fire with fire. Although it is risky, this technique had high results, and helped contain the fire by burning out certain areas with controlled blazes so the main fires would be stopped in their tracks. Fighting the fire did not come without cost. By early September, the fire had cost the government of California over 80 million dollars and had cost us two firefighters. Although the fire no longer posed a threat to homes, as of Sept. 7 it was still blazing through the San Gabriel Mountains. Without doubt, the fire effort was costly, especially in the state of our economy, but nevertheless, it was essential.

    On Sept. 2, a tragedy occurred. Firefighters Ted Hall and Arnie Quinones lost their lives while fighting the Station Fire when their truck careened down a mountain. Firefighters spent their morning on Sept. 4 at the Station Fire Command Station with their heads bowed down in remembrance of their fallen comrades, Hall and Quinones, sharing stories of their memories with their friends. These wildfires have taken so much from so many people in a matter of days. “I’ve been in brushfires where I’ve had fires literally all around me and you don’t realize the magnitude of what you were just in the middle of until you’re done.” firemen Joe Augino and Taylor Byars mentioned. Homes lay in charred piles of wood and memories while massive sums of money have been spent on containment and evacuation efforts. The fires were distinguishable by the massive, foreboding plumes of smoke, which caused many to fear the possibility of the fire endangering their homes. Beth Stogner from the Arcadia Fire Station stated on Sept. 10, “The fire as of today is 71% contained, and has burned a little over 160,000 acres.” Although this was one of the largest wildfires in the history of LA County, it was eventually brought to justice by the combined effort of firefighters and law enforcement after being driven away from people’s homes.

    justinpark

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-09-02
    Age : 22

    Re: Station Fire

    Post  justinpark on Wed Sep 16, 2009 5:29 pm

    California Burnin’
    by Evan Delgado and Justin Park

    Over the past month, wildfires have raged across California, consuming hundreds of thousands of acres, destroying homes, and taking the lives of two valiant firemen. By far, the largest of these fires was the Station Fire. It started on Aug. 26, and grew to be the largest fire in LA County Modern history. The fires affected Arcadia and other communities close to them. Fires this year arrived earlier than California’s expected fire season.

    Students at Arcadia High School weren’t in direct danger of the raging inferno but still felt the effects of the fire in their daily lives. Ashes polluted the air in the vast swaths of land surrounding the fire site. They posed as a threat to students’ health, and especially to those with breathing disorders (such as asthma). P.E. and sports were put on hold to protect the students from inhaling the too much of the ash ridden air. In addition to the danger, the fire also had a psychological effect. Families in Arcadia feared that the fire would move in the direction of Arcadia, endangering their homes. There were already numerous communities around Arcadia that were forced to evacuate which elevated the fear factor. The Station Fire, along with several other fires, had indeed slightly altered the lives of Southern Californians.

    The earliest fire was thought to have begun in the Angeles National Forest near Morris Dam on Aug. 25 as a result of either arson or negligence. This fire was named the Morris Fire which burned 2,168 acres before being successfully contained Sept. 3. A day after the Morris Fire began, the Station Fire started in the Angeles National Forest which is about 35 miles from Arcadia. The Station Fire was also believed to be arson. The fire spread unusually quickly without the help of the hot and dry Santa Ana winds that are known to occur in October. The fire first reached La Cañada Flintridge from the Angeles Crest Freeway, and on Aug. 29 it split heading for Altadena and west towards Briggs Terrace and Crescenta Valley. Briggs Terrace was nearly surrounded by the fierce flames and the radio towers on Mt. Lukens were threatened. Three days later, the fire headed northwest towards other communities. As the fire approached Tujunga, LA County Sheriff Deputies evacuated homes along the hillside. The fire gradually started to be contained by the efforts of the firefighters.

    Although by Sept. 6, the fire had begun to be contained. It had already done more damage than any other fire in LA County. The fire even burned a quarter of the Angeles National Forest, closing it indefinitely and leaving acres of forest burned to a crisp. Because the Angeles National Forest was endangered, officials were forced to move wildlife away from the area. This process definitely wasn’t an easy task when there were hundreds of wild animals that needed relocating. People in the area have mourned for the amazing natural wonders which have been destroyed and the escapism it offered from the big city. As the fire continued, the Arcadia Fire Department sent two crews to assist with the fire effort. “Whenever there’s a big fire, we always send men over there,” Arcadia fireman Joe Augino said.

    As the fire spread and threatened many communities, firefighters employed many of their various techniques to contain the blaze. In addition to using water, seeking out “hotspots,” and attempting to smother the fire with materials dropped from helicopters and planes, they used the tactic of fighting fire with fire. Although it is risky, this technique had high results, and helped contain the fire by burning out certain areas with controlled blazes so the main fires would be stopped in their tracks. Fighting the fire did not come without cost. By early September, the fire had cost the government of California over 80 million dollars and had cost us two firefighters. Although the fire no longer posed a threat to homes, as of Sept. 7 it was still blazing through the San Gabriel Mountains. Without doubt, the fire effort was costly, especially in the state of our economy, but nevertheless, it was essential.

    On Sept. 2, a tragedy occurred. Firefighters Ted Hall and Arnie Quinones lost their lives while fighting the Station Fire when their truck careened down a mountain. Firefighters spent their morning on Sept. 4 at the Station Fire Command Station with their heads bowed down in remembrance of their fallen comrades, Hall and Quinones, sharing stories of their memories with their friends. These wildfires have taken so much from so many people in a matter of days. “I’ve been in brushfires where I’ve had fires literally all around me and you don’t realize the magnitude of what you were just in the middle of until you’re done.” firemen Joe Augino and Taylor Byars mentioned. Homes lay in charred piles of wood and memories while massive sums of money have been spent on containment and evacuation efforts. The fires were distinguishable by the massive, foreboding plumes of smoke, which caused many to fear the possibility of the fire endangering their homes. Beth Stogner from the Arcadia Fire Station stated on Sept. 10, “The fire as of today is 71% contained, and has burned a little over 160,000 acres.” Although this was one of the largest wildfires in the history of LA County, it was eventually brought to justice by the combined effort of firefighters and law enforcement after being driven away from people’s homes

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Station Fire

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Wed Sep 16, 2009 6:16 pm

    i don't see anything else to edit! good job!

    justinpark

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-09-02
    Age : 22

    Re: Station Fire

    Post  justinpark on Thu Sep 17, 2009 9:07 pm

    thanks :] its not gonna be on the paper but whatever, evan and i worked hard on it XD

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