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    andrewchang

    Posts : 38
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    California Weather

    Post  andrewchang on Mon Feb 08, 2010 12:05 am

    ven California weather has its drawbacks.



    The primary problem we face today is drought; from 2006 to now, the Golden State has seen far-below-average levels of precipitation. According to the Department of Water Resources, “Current drought conditions are causing economic hardship in California, particularly in agricultural communities.” And indeed, severe economic damage is occurring; according to a study done by the University of California at Davis, the Central Valley farm revenue loss was estimated to be between $325 million and $477 million. With California’s agricultural production a staple of its state economy, it’s no wonder that the drought is a far-reaching conundrum. After all, even unemployment rates saw a large rise as 16,200 to 23,700 full-time jobs were lost as a result of the drought and the limited farming opportunities it created.



    The implications are far-reaching as well, extending beyond revenue loss to increased statewide fire risks and a large reduction in hydropower generation. According to junior Ray Chao, “Water conservation is quickly becoming a key issue when it comes to California, and it is one that we need to realize is actually a major problem that we need to take head-on.” And with the current growing necessity for rural homeowners to dig deeper wells, and to find enough vegetation on which cattle can graze, one would be inclined to agree with Chao’s contention.



    Ironically, our necessity for water was followed up recently by torrential downpours in mid-January. Somewhere around 800 homes in the greater Los Angeles area have been asked to evacuate, in the midst of power outages and chaos. The last storm, which hit Southern California on Jan 11, came with 80 mph winds and waves that came in at up to 20 feet high. A tornado also hit, causing damage to cars, outbuildings, and agriculture in the area. The damage caused by the storms was so bad, in fact, that Acting Governor Edmund Brown declared a state of emergency in L.A. County. “I’ve never expected such a storm to happen in California, much less a tornado” remarked sophomore Greg Chang.



    As it seems, California has a long road ahead of it when it comes to water conservation and control. But with the new Integrated Regional Water Management initiative, the working of various areas in solidarity to conserve water may be bringing us one step closer to solving our state’s water problems once and for all.

    Joanna Liao

    Posts : 161
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 23

    Re: California Weather

    Post  Joanna Liao on Mon Feb 08, 2010 6:20 pm

    Ven (even) California weather has its drawbacks.



    The primary problem we face today is drought; from 2006 to now, the Golden State has seen far-below-average levels of precipitation. According to the Department of Water Resources, “Current drought conditions are causing economic hardship in California, particularly in agricultural communities.” And indeed, severe economic damage is occurring; according to a study done by the University of California at Davis, the Central Valley farm revenue loss was estimated to be between $325 million and $477 million. With California’s agricultural production a staple of its state economy, it’s no wonder that the drought is a far-reaching conundrum. After all, even unemployment rates saw a large rise as 16,200 to 23,700 full-time jobs were lost as a result of the drought and the limited farming opportunities it created.



    The implications are far-reaching as well, extending beyond revenue loss to increased statewide fire risks and a large reduction in hydropower generation. According to junior Ray Chao, “Water conservation is quickly becoming a key issue when it comes to California, and it is one that we need to realize is actually a major problem that we need to take head-on.” And with the current growing necessity for rural homeowners to dig deeper wells, (delete comma) and to find enough vegetation on which cattle can graze, one would be inclined to agree with Chao’s (Ray’s) contention.



    Ironically, our necessity for water was followed up recently by torrential downpours in mid-January. Somewhere around 800 homes in the greater Los Angeles area have been asked to evacuate, in the midst of power outages and chaos. The last storm, which hit Southern California on Jan (Jan.) 11, came with 80 mph winds and waves that came in at (awk) up to 20 feet high. A tornado also hit, causing damage to cars, outbuildings, and agriculture in the area. The damage caused by the storms was so bad, in fact, that Acting Governor Edmund Brown declared a state of emergency in L.A. County. “I’ve never expected such a storm to happen in California, much less a tornado” (comma) remarked sophomore Greg Chang.



    As it seems, California has a long road ahead of it when it comes to water conservation and control. But with the new Integrated Regional Water Management initiative, the working of various areas in solidarity to conserve water may be bringing us one step closer to solving our state’s water problems once and for all.

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