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    J.D. Salinger's Death

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    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    J.D. Salinger's Death

    Post  ashleychi on Mon Feb 08, 2010 12:38 am

    J.D. Salinger was a man of mystery. Shying away from the media’s spotlight and what would be considered any other author’s dream life, he spent most of his life in recluse after authoring few but influential works. As with most things mysterious and kept out of reach, Salinger’s reclusive personality only kept the masses hungering for more. When Salinger passed away on Jan. 27 at the age of 91, the literary world mourned. But more wondered if his unpublished works would finally be revealed to the world.

    With a small but prominent handful of published compositions, Salinger is one of the most substantial figures in the literary world, famous for not wanting to be famous. He was born and raised in New York, attended a military academy in Pennsylvania, and enlisted in the U.S. Army. However, he suffered a nervous breakdown four years into service, and started publishing short stories in various newspapers and magazines. After receiving much acclaim and attention for his best-selling novel The Catcher In The Rye and unwillingly accepting the prominent status he was given, Salinger retreated back from the world. Salinger himself said that the only people who he could truly connect with were children. The only time he broke his decades of silence and dared to venture out of his countryside home was to sue against the unauthorized publication of his biography.

    Now that Salinger, who was the fiercest protector of his own works, is gone, there is much speculation surrounding the trove of unpublished works remaining at his house. As predicted, the cults of Salingerists are now hungrier than ever for the publication of their idol’s later works. The coveted documents consist of manuscripts Salinger had written for his own pleasure while residing at his house, as Salinger had once declared, “There is a marvelous peace in not publishing. I love to write. But I write just for myself and my own pleasure.” It is likely that, like many authors before him including Charles Dickens, he had torched all his manuscripts and journals right before he passed away. Even if such archives are found, there is also the matter of privacy that Salinger specifically asked to continue be upheld. Soon, the issue may come to a compromise between society’s respect for the author’s wishes for privacy and their own desires. For now, Salinger’s literary agents are strictly adhering to the code of privacy Salinger had set for them.

    J.D. Salinger’s silence and emblematic resistance to money, fame, and adulation acted as a buffer against the fast-paced world most of us live in today. Looking back, the silence he held was a reminder to the rest of the world that a life in the spotlight may not always be enjoyable to everyone. As the world waits to see if Salinger had indeed left behind unpublished manuscripts, we must remember that writing was Salinger’s “escape from the hostile world.”


    J.D. Salinger: Mystery Man
    Leaving a Mystery Behind

    Joanna Liao

    Posts : 161
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 23

    Re: J.D. Salinger's Death

    Post  Joanna Liao on Mon Feb 08, 2010 6:10 pm

    J.D. Salinger was a man of mystery. Shying away from the media’s spotlight and what would be considered any other author’s dream life, he spent most of his life in recluse after authoring few but influential works. As with most things mysterious and kept out of reach, Salinger’s reclusive personality only kept the masses hungering for more. When Salinger passed away on Jan. 27 at the age of 91, the literary world mourned. But (many) more wondered if his unpublished works would finally be revealed to the world.

    With a small but prominent handful of published compositions, Salinger is one of the most substantial figures in the literary world, famous for not wanting to be famous. He was born and raised in New York, attended a military academy in Pennsylvania, and enlisted in the U.S. Army. However, he suffered a nervous breakdown four years into service, and started publishing short stories in various newspapers and magazines. After receiving much acclaim and attention for his best-selling novel The Catcher In The Rye (underline?) and unwillingly accepting the prominent status he was given, Salinger retreated back from the world. Salinger himself said that the only people who he could truly connect with were children. The only time he broke his decades of silence and dared to venture out of his countryside home was to sue against the unauthorized publication of his biography.

    Now that Salinger, who was the fiercest protector of his own works, is gone, there is much speculation surrounding the trove of unpublished works remaining at his house. As predicted, the cults of Salingerists (?) are now hungrier than ever for the publication of their idol’s later works. The coveted documents consist of manuscripts Salinger had written for his own pleasure while residing at his house, as Salinger had once declared, “There is a marvelous peace in not publishing. I love to write. But I write just for myself and my own pleasure.” It is likely that, like many authors before him including Charles Dickens, he had torched all his manuscripts and journals right before he passed away. Even if such archives are found, there is also the matter of privacy that Salinger specifically asked to continue be upheld. Soon, the issue may come to a compromise between society’s respect for the author’s wishes for privacy and their own desires. For now, Salinger’s literary agents are strictly adhering to the code of privacy Salinger had set for them.

    J.D. Salinger’s silence and emblematic resistance to money, fame, and adulation acted as a buffer against the fast-paced world most of us live in today. Looking back, the silence he held was a reminder to the rest of the world that a life in the spotlight may not always be enjoyable to everyone. As the world waits to see if Salinger had indeed left behind unpublished manuscripts, we must remember that writing was Salinger’s “escape from the hostile world.”

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: J.D. Salinger's Death

    Post  ashleychi on Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:05 am

    J.D. Salinger was a man of mystery. Shying away from the media’s spotlight and what would be considered any other author’s dream life, he spent most of his life in recluse after authoring few but influential works. As with most things mysterious and kept out of reach, Salinger’s reclusive personality only kept the masses hungering for more. When Salinger passed away on Jan. 27 at the age of 91, the literary world mourned. But many more wondered if his unpublished works would finally be revealed to the world.

    With a small but prominent handful of published compositions, Salinger is one of the most substantial figures in the literary world, famous for not wanting to be famous. He was born and raised in New York, attended a military academy in Pennsylvania, and enlisted in the U.S. Army. However, he suffered a nervous breakdown four years into service, and started publishing short stories in various newspapers and magazines. After receiving much acclaim and attention for his best-selling novel The Catcher In The Rye and unwillingly accepting the prominent status he was given, Salinger retreated back from the world. Salinger himself said that the only people who he could truly connect with were children. The only time he broke his decades of silence and dared to venture out of his countryside home was to sue against the unauthorized publication of his biography.

    Now that Salinger, who was the fiercest protector of his own works, is gone, there is much speculation surrounding the trove of unpublished works remaining at his house. As predicted, the cults of Salingerists are now hungrier than ever for the publication of their idol’s later works. Sophomore Ru Hua said that she could “[understand] the obsession with Salinger’s writing- [because] it is different and interesting.” The coveted documents consist of manuscripts Salinger had written for his own pleasure while residing at his house, as Salinger had once declared, “There is a marvelous peace in not publishing. I love to write. But I write just for myself and my own pleasure.” It is likely that, like many authors before him including Charles Dickens, he had torched all his manuscripts and journals right before he passed away. Even if such archives are found, there is also the matter of privacy that Salinger specifically asked to continue be upheld. Soon, the issue may come to a compromise between society’s respect for the author’s wishes for privacy and their own desires. For now, Salinger’s literary agents are strictly adhering to the code of privacy Salinger had set for them.

    J.D. Salinger’s silence and emblematic resistance to money, fame, and adulation acted as a buffer against the fast-paced world most of us live in today. Looking back, the silence he held was a reminder to the rest of the world that a life in the spotlight may not always be enjoyable to everyone. As the world waits to see if Salinger had indeed left behind unpublished manuscripts, we must remember that writing was Salinger’s “escape from the hostile world.”

    Salingerists- what the media calls Salinger-obesssed people
    TEACHER QUOTES & MORE STUDENT QUOTES COMING SOON (:

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: J.D. Salinger's Death

    Post  reginaliu on Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:39 pm

    FROM ASHLEY:

    J.D. Salinger was a man of mystery. Shying away from the media’s spotlight and what would be considered any other author’s dream life, he spent most of his life in recluse after authoring few but influential works. As with most things mysterious and kept out of reach, Salinger’s reclusive personality only kept the masses hungering for more. When Salinger passed away on Jan. 27 at the age of 91, the literary world mourned. But many more wondered if his unpublished works would finally be revealed to the world.

    With a small but prominent handful of published compositions, Salinger is one of the most substantial figures in the literary world, famous for not wanting to be famous. He was born and raised in New York, attended a military academy in Pennsylvania, and enlisted in the U.S. Army. However, he suffered a nervous breakdown four years into service, and started publishing short stories in various newspapers and magazines. After receiving much acclaim and attention for his best-selling novel The Catcher In The Rye and unwillingly accepting the prominent status he was given, Salinger retreated back from the world. Salinger himself said that the only people who he could truly connect with were children. The only time he broke his decades of silence and dared to venture out of his countryside home was to sue against the unauthorized publication of his biography.

    Now that Salinger, who was the fiercest protector of his own works, is gone, there is much speculation surrounding the trove of unpublished works remaining at his house. As predicted, the cults of Salingerists are now hungrier than ever for the publication of their idol’s later works. Sophomore Ru Hua said that she could “[understand] the obsession with Salinger’s writing- [because] it is different and interesting.” The coveted documents consist of manuscripts Salinger had written for his own pleasure while residing at his house, as Salinger had once declared, “There is a marvelous peace in not publishing. I love to write. But I write just for myself and my own pleasure.” It is likely that, like many authors before him including Charles Dickens, he had torched all his manuscripts and journals right before he passed away. Even if such archives are found, there is also the matter of privacy that Salinger specifically asked to continue be upheld. Soon, the issue may come to a compromise between society’s respect for the author’s wishes for privacy and their own desires. For now, Salinger’s literary agents are strictly adhering to the code of privacy Salinger had set for them. English teacher Ms. Claudia Diaz exclaims that “[Salinger’s] characters transcend labels and themes are universal… [and] I do cherish the idea that his works have not just ended with his recluse lifestyle.”

    J.D. Salinger’s silence and emblematic resistance to money, fame, and adulation acted as a buffer against the fast-paced world most of us live in today. Looking back, the silence he held was a reminder to the rest of the world that a life in the spotlight may not always be enjoyable to everyone. As the world waits to see if Salinger had indeed left behind unpublished manuscripts, we must remember that writing was Salinger’s “escape from the hostile world.”

    ashleychi

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: J.D. Salinger's Death

    Post  ashleychi on Thu Feb 11, 2010 12:30 am

    J.D. Salinger was a man of mystery. Shying away from the media’s spotlight and what would be considered any other author’s dream life, he spent most of his life in recluse after authoring few but influential works. As with most things mysterious and kept out of reach, Salinger’s reclusive personality only kept the masses hungering for more. When Salinger passed away on Jan. 27 at the age of 91, the literary world mourned. But many more wondered if his unpublished works would finally be revealed to the world.

    With a small but prominent handful of published compositions, Salinger is one of the most substantial figures in the literary world, ironically becoming famous for his resistance to the . He was born and raised in New York, attended a military academy in Pennsylvania, and enlisted in the U.S. Army. However, he suffered a nervous breakdown four years into service, and started publishing short stories in various newspapers and magazines. After receiving much acclaim and attention for his best-selling novel The Catcher In The Rye and unwillingly accepting the prominent status he was given, Salinger retreated back from the world. Salinger himself said that the only people who he could truly connect with were children. The only time he broke his decades of silence and dared to venture out of his countryside home was to sue against the unauthorized publication of his biography.

    Now that Salinger, who was the fiercest protector of his own works, is gone, there is much speculation surrounding the trove of unpublished works remaining at his house. As predicted, the cults of Salingerists are now hungrier than ever for the publication of their idol’s later works. Sophomore Ru Hua said that she could “[understand] the obsession with Salinger’s writing- [because] it is different and interesting.” The coveted documents consist of manuscripts Salinger had written for his own pleasure while residing at his house, as Salinger had once declared, “There is a marvelous peace in not publishing. I love to write. But I write just for myself and my own pleasure.” It is likely that, like many authors before him including Charles Dickens, he had torched all his manuscripts and journals right before he passed away. English teacher Ms. Claudia Diaz hopes this didn’t happen, as she “cherish[es] the idea that his works have not just ended with his recluse lifestyle, and would read anything that is found in his home.” However, even if such archives are found, there is also the matter of privacy that Salinger specifically asked to continue be upheld. Soon, the issue may come to a compromise between society’s respect for the author’s wishes for privacy and their own desires. For now, Salinger’s literary agents are strictly adhering to the code of privacy Salinger had set for them.

    J.D. Salinger’s silence and emblematic resistance to money, fame, and adulation acted as a buffer against the fast-paced world most of us live in today. Looking back, the silence he held was a reminder to the rest of the world that a life in the spotlight may not always be enjoyable to everyone. However, he will always be remembered, as Mr. Albert Sylvia said, “[His greatest novel] Catcher in the Rye will always generate a lot of good discussion [especially] for its complaints about society." As the world waits to see if Salinger had indeed left behind unpublished manuscripts, we must remember that writing was Salinger’s “escape from the hostile world.”

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