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    NHS soup kitchen

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    JadeShao

    Posts : 44
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    NHS soup kitchen

    Post  JadeShao on Mon Feb 08, 2010 9:58 pm

    Donning aprons, putting on disposable plastic gloves and wearing incredibly stylish hairnets, AHS’ National Honor Society (NHS) was hard at work preparing dinner at the Union Rescue Mission, a local soup kitchen in downtown LA, on Saturday Feb. 6 from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Organized as one of the two mandatory volunteer projects, NHS had the opportunity to perform a host of tasks for the Union Rescue Mission, which feeds around 900 people a day. Students were responsible for cutting zucchini, squash, and even onions (which induced tears from Ms. Chow, chaperone of the group). Now, feeding a third of that “900 people a day” did not mean cutting two or three zucchinis and a couple of squashes, no, it mean eight gigantic 35 by 45 inch cutting boards, 12 students wielding knives (which were slightly dull and very safe), and nine boxes filled with zucchini and squash. In addition, members of NHS swept and mopped the kitchen floors, cleaned cafeteria tables and took turns serving the food. The menu for that Saturday night’s dinner consisted of rice (which junior Nancy Lam insisted on “fluffing” as seen on the Food Network), hamburger meat patties, beans with onions, zucchini and squash, corn bread and salad with cherry tomatoes. By the end of the day, after hours of hard work, the food that NHS members were supposed to be serving looked quite appetizing as junior Lily Chen began hungrily eyeing the corn bread.
    For a majority of NHS students, this was the first time they had volunteered at a soup kitchen and found the experience one of a kind. “This is definitely one of those things you have to do at least once in your life” commented junior Jasmine Zhou. Being able to witness the gravity of the situation, that poverty exists even in one of the largest metropolitan cities like Los Angeles, allowed students to appreciate how lucky and privileged they were. As the kitchen staff and each individual served thanked the NHS members for giving up their Saturday nights and taking the time to help out their community, students felt a sense of fulfillment and promised to return as coordinator, junior Irene Liu said, “We will definitely come back and do this again. In fact, plans have already been made that this will be next month’s project too!”

    oisheeshemontee

    Posts : 145
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 22

    Copyedit #1

    Post  oisheeshemontee on Tue Feb 09, 2010 12:24 am

    Donning aprons, putting on disposable plastic gloves and wearing incredibly stylish hairnets, AHS’ National Honor Society (NHS) was hard at work preparing dinner at the Union Rescue Mission, a local soup kitchen in downtown LA, on Saturday Feb. 6 from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Organized as one of the two mandatory volunteer projects [of the society], NHS had the opportunity to perform a host of tasks for the Union Rescue Mission, which feeds around 900 people a day.

    Students were responsible for cutting zucchini, squash, and even onions (which induced tears from Ms. [First name?] Chow, chaperone of the group [was she the only one? Maybe you want to say, 'which induced tears from many, including chaperone Ms. Christina Chow']). Now, feeding a third of that “900 people a day” did not mean cutting two or three zucchinis and a couple of squashes, [change comma to semicolon] no, it mean [meant] eight gigantic 35 by 45 inch cutting boards, 12 students wielding [slightly dull and very safe] knives (which were slightly dull and very safe), and nine boxes filled [to the brim] with zucchini and squash. In addition, members of NHS swept and mopped the kitchen floors, cleaned cafeteria tables and took turns serving the food. The menu for that Saturday night’s dinner consisted of rice (which junior Nancy Lam insisted on “fluffing” as seen on the Food Network), hamburger meat patties, beans with onions, zucchini and squash, corn bread and salad with cherry tomatoes. By the end of the day, after hours of hard work, the food that NHS members were supposed to be serving looked quite appetizing as junior Lily Chen began hungrily eyeing the corn bread. [LOL This last part about Lily is really random, there's really no need for it...]

    For a majority of NHS students, this was the first time they had volunteered at a soup kitchen and found the experience one of a kind. “This is definitely one of those things you have to do at least once in your life” commented junior Jasmine Zhou. Being able [The opportunity] to witness the gravity of the situation, that poverty exists even in [Los Angeles,] one of the largest metropolitan cities [in the world] like Los Angeles, allowed students to appreciate how lucky and privileged they were. As the kitchen staff and each individual served thanked the NHS members for giving up their Saturday nights and taking the time to help out their community, students felt a sense of fulfillment and promised to return as coordinator, junior Irene Liu said, “We will definitely come back and do this again. In fact, plans have already been made that this will be next month’s project too!”.

    JadeShao

    Posts : 44
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    DRAFT 2

    Post  JadeShao on Tue Feb 09, 2010 5:35 pm

    Donning aprons, putting on disposable plastic gloves and wearing incredibly stylish hairnets, AHS’ National Honor Society (NHS) was hard at work preparing dinner at the Union Rescue Mission, a local soup kitchen in downtown LA, on Saturday Feb. 6 from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Organized as one of the two mandatory volunteer projects of the term, NHS had the opportunity to perform a host of tasks for the Union Rescue Mission, which feeds around 900 people a day.

    Students were responsible for cutting zucchini, squash, and even onions (which induced tears from many, including chaperone Ms. Christina Chow). Now, feeding a third of that “900 people a day” did not mean cutting two or three zucchinis and a couple of squashes; no, it meant eight gigantic 35 by 45 inch cutting boards, 12 students wielding slightly dull and very safe knives, and nine boxes filled to the brim with zucchini and squash. In addition, members of NHS swept and mopped the kitchen floors, cleaned cafeteria tables and took turns serving the food. The menu for that Saturday night’s dinner consisted of rice (which junior Nancy Lam insisted on “fluffing” as seen on the Food Network), hamburger meat patties, beans with onions, zucchini and squash, corn bread and salad with cherry tomatoes. By the end of the day, after hours of hard work, the food that NHS members were supposed to be serving looked quite appetizing.
    For a majority of NHS students, this was the first time they had volunteered at a soup kitchen and found the experience one of a kind. “This is definitely one of those things you have to do at least once in your life” commented junior Jasmine Zhou. The opportunity to witness the gravity of the situation, that poverty exists even in Los Angeles, one of the largest metropolitan cities in the world, allowed students to appreciate how lucky and privileged they were. As the kitchen staff and each individual served thanked the NHS members for giving up their Saturday nights and taking the time to help out their community, students felt a sense of fulfillment and promised to return as coordinator, junior Irene Liu said, “We will definitely come back and do this again. In fact, plans have already been made that this will be next month’s project too!”

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