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    Psychological Effects of Movies

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    Joanna Shen

    Posts : 87
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Psychological Effects of Movies

    Post  Joanna Shen on Tue Mar 09, 2010 8:37 pm

    Mind-boggling Motion Pictures
    Movies: Innocent Fun or Psychological Hypnotist?
    Probing the Mind

    They serve as the perfect alternative to studying on Friday nights, provide entertainment when out with friends, and can make you laugh, bawl, and shriek all in a span of two hours. From drive-in theaters to Netflix, the accessibility of movies has exponentially increased with the advent of technology. It is safe to say that movies have been and will remain popular for a long time to come. Whether they trigger gloomy emotions or cause us to erupt in laughter, movies are simply moving pictures on a screen right? Though we often treat movies as temporary forms of satisfaction, their effects on our minds can be permanent.
    G-Rated Cartoons. The most innocent and viewer-friendly of the bunch, Disney movies have long been heralded as one of the entertainment industry’s greatest inventions. We watch them with our younger siblings and never fail to return back to Lion King when we’re feeling nostalgic. Despite the happy endings and moral values, studies show that G-rated movies can contribute to depression and anxiety. Cartoons are, in actuality, more violent than reality. The violence is simply masked with sparks and big kabooms. The extreme violence and action found in cartoons weakens the emotional structure of the mind and disrupts the chemical balance within the human mind. Beauty and the Beast and The Wizard of Oz are major offenders in the area of violence and separation anxiety, often leaving everlasting, subconscious impressions in our minds of the deceptive nature of the people around us.
    Chick Flicks. The Notebook versus Fast & Furious? Girls would often times choose to squeal over the heart-wrenching and romantic relationship between Noah and Allie as opposed to crashing cars. Romantic dramas appeal to girls like Call of Duty to boys. New research at the University of Michigan (U-M) have shown, to the benefit of hopeless romantics, that romantic movies can boost progesterone levels more than 10%. Progesterone is known to reduce anxiety and increase attentiveness in people. "When you’re watching movies, your hormones are responding, not just your mind," said U-M psychology professor, Oliver Schultheiss. So the next time girls want to drag their significant other to see the next installment of the Twilight series, they have a new argument to add to their inventory; it’s good for his health.
    Slasher Films. Some of us grow nauseous at the sight of an open wound while others teeter at the edge of their seats in horrified excitement. Fear triggers a release in adrenaline, which in return increases metabolic rate and sends your blood pressure and heart rate soaring. Though essential to the fight-or-flight response, adrenaline does pose certain risks because continuous release of this hormone can cause you to experience more colds and infections, aches and pains, and fatigue. A University of Wisconsin study on 150 college students and their responses to horror movies revealed that more than 25% of students in the study experienced "residual anxiety" and about 30% of the students experienced this level of anxiety for up to a year after being exposed to the movie.
    We often underestimate the extent to which movies affect our lives psychologically. However, movies often pose little to no harm if watched in moderation. With an extended knowledge of reality, we can ensure that we know just what we’re up against the next time we watch Halloween or Pinocchio.

    Joanna Shen

    Posts : 87
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Psychological Effects of Movies

    Post  Joanna Shen on Sat Mar 13, 2010 1:24 am

    They serve as the perfect alternative to studying on Friday nights, provide entertainment when out with friends, and can make you laugh, bawl, and shriek all in a span of two hours. From drive-in theaters to Netflix, the accessibility of movies has exponentially increased with the advent of technology. It is safe to say that movies have been and will remain popular for a long time to come. Whether they trigger gloomy emotions or cause us to erupt in laughter, movies are simply moving pictures on a screen, right? Though we often treat movies as temporary forms of satisfaction, their effects on our minds can be permanent.
    Slasher Films. Some of us are nauseated at the sight of an open wound while others teeter on the edge of their seats in horrified excitement. Fear triggers a release in adrenaline, which in return increases metabolic rate and sends your blood pressure and heart rate soaring. Though essential to the fight-or-flight response, adrenaline does pose certain risks because continuous release of this hormone can cause you to experience more colds and infections, aches and pains, and fatigue. A University of Wisconsin study on 150 college students and their responses to horror movies revealed that more than 25% of students in the study experienced "residual anxiety" and about 30% of the students experienced this level of anxiety for up to a year after being exposed to the movies.
    G-Rated Cartoons. The most innocent and viewer-friendly of the bunch, cartoons have long been heralded as one of the entertainment industry’s greatest inventions. We watch them with our younger siblings and never fail to return back to The Lion King when we’re feeling nostalgic. Despite the happy endings and moral values, studies show that G-rated movies can contribute to depression and anxiety in children. Cartoons are, in actuality, more violent than reality. The violence is simply masked with sparks and big kabooms. The extreme violence and action found in cartoons weaken the emotional structure of the mind and disrupt the chemical balance within the human mind. Beauty and the Beast and The Wizard of Oz are major offenders in the area of violence and separation anxiety, often leaving everlasting, subconscious impressions on our minds of the deceptive nature of the people around us.
    Chick Flicks. The Notebook versus Fast & Furious? Girls would oftentimes choose to squeal over the heart-wrenching and romantic relationship between Noah and Allie as opposed to crashing cars. Romantic dramas appeal to girls like Call of Duty to boys. New research at the University of Michigan (U-M) has shown, to the benefit of hopeless romantics, that romantic movies can boost progesterone levels more than 10%. Progesterone is known to reduce anxiety and increase attentiveness in people. "When you’re watching movies, your hormones are responding, not just your mind," said U-M psychology professor Oliver Schultheiss. So the next time girls want to drag their significant other to see the next installment of the Twilight, they have a new argument to add to their inventory; it’s good for his health.
    We often underestimate the extent to which movies affect our lives psychologically. However, movies often pose little to no harm if watched in moderation. With an extended knowledge of reality, we can ensure that we know just what we’re up against the next time we watch Halloween or Pinocchio.

    oisheeshemontee

    Posts : 145
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 23

    Copyedit #1

    Post  oisheeshemontee on Mon Mar 15, 2010 10:19 pm

    Um, Joanna, I can't find anything wrong with your article, it's basically perfect (and really interesting!!) Good job!! Very Happy

    Joanna Shen

    Posts : 87
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Psychological Effects of Movies

    Post  Joanna Shen on Tue Mar 16, 2010 12:44 pm

    They serve as perfect alternatives to studying on Friday nights, provide entertainment when out with friends, and can make you laugh, bawl, and shriek all in a span of two hours. From drive-in theaters to Netflix, the accessibility of movies has exponentially increased with the advent of technology. Whether they trigger gloomy emotions or cause us to erupt in laughter, movies are simply moving pictures on a screen, right? Though we often treat movies as temporary forms of satisfaction, their effects on our minds can be permanent.
    Slasher Films. Some of us are nauseated at the sight of an open wound while others teeter on the edge of their seats in horrified excitement. Fear triggers a release in adrenaline, which in return increases metabolic rate and sends your blood pressure and heart rate soaring. Though essential to the fight-or-flight response, adrenaline does pose certain risks because continuous release of this hormone can cause you to experience more colds and infections, aches and pains, and fatigue. A University of Wisconsin study on 150 college students and their responses to horror movies revealed that more than 25% of students in the study experienced "residual anxiety" and about 30% of the students experienced this level of anxiety for up to a year after being exposed to the movies.
    G-Rated Cartoons. The most innocent and viewer-friendly of the bunch, cartoons have long been heralded as one of the entertainment industry’s greatest inventions. We watch them with our younger siblings and never fail to return back to The Lion King when we’re feeling nostalgic. Despite the happy endings, studies show that G-rated movies can contribute to depression and anxiety in children. Cartoons are, in actuality, more violent than reality. The violence is simply masked with sparks and big kabooms. The extreme violence and action found in cartoons weaken the emotional structure of the mind and disrupt the chemical balance within the human mind. Beauty and the Beast and The Wizard of Oz are major offenders in the area of violence and separation anxiety, often leaving everlasting, subconscious impressions on our minds of the deceptive nature of the people around us.
    Chick Flicks. Girls would oftentimes choose to squeal over the heart-wrenching relationship between Noah and Allie as opposed to crashing cars. New research at the University of Michigan (U-M) has shown, to the benefit of hopeless romantics, that romantic movies can boost progesterone levels more than 10%. Progesterone is known to reduce anxiety and increase attentiveness in people. "When you’re watching movies, your hormones are responding, not just your mind," said U-M psychology professor Oliver Schultheiss. So the next time girls want to drag their significant other to see the next installment of the Twilight, they have a new argument to add to their inventory; it’s good for his health.
    We often underestimate the extent to which movies affect our lives psychologically. With moderation and an extended knowledge of reality, we can ensure that we know just what we’re up against the next time we watch Halloween or Pinocchio.

    Joanna Shen

    Posts : 87
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Psychological Effects of Movies

    Post  Joanna Shen on Tue Mar 16, 2010 12:46 pm

    They serve as perfect alternatives to studying on Friday nights, provide entertainment when out with friends, and can make you laugh, bawl, and shriek all in a span of two hours. From drive-in theaters to Netflix, the accessibility of movies has exponentially increased with the advent of technology. Whether they trigger gloomy emotions or cause us to erupt in laughter, movies are simply moving pictures on a screen, right? Though we often treat movies as temporary forms of satisfaction, their effects on our minds can be permanent.
    Slasher Films. Some of us are nauseated at the sight of an open wound while others teeter on the edge of their seats in horrified excitement. Fear triggers a release in adrenaline, which in return increases metabolic rate and sends your blood pressure and heart rate soaring. Though essential to the fight-or-flight response, adrenaline does pose certain risks because continuous release of this hormone can cause you to experience more colds and infections, aches and pains, and fatigue. A University of Wisconsin study on 150 college students and their responses to horror movies revealed that more than 25% of students in the study experienced "residual anxiety" and about 30% of the students experienced this level of anxiety for up to a year after being exposed to the movies.
    G-Rated Cartoons. The most innocent and viewer-friendly of the bunch, cartoons have long been heralded as one of the entertainment industry’s greatest inventions. We watch them with our younger siblings and never fail to return back to The Lion King when we’re feeling nostalgic. Despite the happy endings, studies show that G-rated movies can contribute to depression and anxiety in children. Cartoons are, in actuality, more violent than reality. The extreme violence and action found in cartoons weaken the emotional structure of the mind and disrupt the chemical balance within the brain. Beauty and the Beast and The Wizard of Oz are major offenders in the area of violence and separation anxiety, often leaving everlasting, subconscious impressions on our minds of the deceptive nature of the people around us.
    Chick Flicks. Girls would oftentimes choose to squeal over the heart-wrenching relationship between Noah and Allie as opposed to crashing cars. New research at the University of Michigan (U-M) has shown, to the benefit of hopeless romantics, that romantic movies can boost progesterone levels more than 10%. Progesterone is known to reduce anxiety and increase attentiveness in people. "When you’re watching movies, your hormones are responding, not just your mind," said U-M psychology professor Oliver Schultheiss. So the next time girls want to drag their significant other to see the next installment of the Twilight, they have a new argument to add to their inventory; it’s good for his health.
    We often underestimate the extent to which movies affect our lives psychologically. With moderation and an extended knowledge of reality, we can ensure that we know just what we’re up against the next time we watch Halloween or Pinocchio.

    ElaineTsui

    Posts : 9
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Psychological Effects of Movies

    Post  ElaineTsui on Mon Mar 22, 2010 2:07 am

    They serve as perfect alternatives to studying on Friday nights, provide entertainment when out with friends, and can make you laugh, bawl, and shriek all in a span of two hours. From drive-in theaters to Netflix, the accessibility of movies has exponentially increased with the advent of technology. Whether they trigger gloomy emotions or cause us to erupt in laughter, movies are simply moving pictures on a screen, right? Though we often treat movies as temporary forms of satisfaction, their effects on our minds can be permanent.
    Slasher Films. Some of us are nauseated at the sight of an open wound, while others teeter on the edge of their seats in horrified excitement. Fear triggers a release of adrenaline, which in return increases metabolic rate and sends your blood pressure and heart rate soaring. Though essential to the fight-or-flight response, adrenaline does pose certain risks because continuous release of this hormone can cause you to experience more colds and infections, aches and pains, and fatigue. A University of Wisconsin study on 150 college students and their responses to horror movies revealed that more than 25% of students in the study experienced "residual anxiety" and about 30% of the students experienced this level of anxiety for up to a year after being exposed to these movies.
    G-Rated Cartoons. The most innocent and viewer-friendly of the bunch, cartoons have long been heralded as one of the entertainment industry’s greatest inventions. We watch them with our younger siblings and never fail to return back to The Lion King when we’re feeling nostalgic. Despite the happy endings, studies show that G-rated movies can contribute to depression and anxiety in children. Cartoons are, in actuality, more violent than reality. The extreme violence and action found in cartoons weaken the emotional structure of the mind and disrupt the chemical balance within the brain. Beauty and the Beast and The Wizard of Oz are major offenders in the area of violence and separation anxiety, often leaving everlasting, subconscious impressions on our minds of the deceptive nature of the people around us.
    Chick Flicks. Girls would oftentimes choose to squeal over the heart-wrenching relationship between Noah and Allie as opposed to crashing cars. New research at the University of Michigan (U-M) has shown, to the benefit of hopeless romantics, that romantic movies can boost progesterone levels more than 10%. Progesterone is known to reduce anxiety and increase attentiveness in people. "When you’re watching movies, your hormones are responding, not just your mind," said U-M psychology professor Oliver Schultheiss. So the next time girls want to drag their significant other to see the next installment of the Twilight series, they have a new argument to add to their inventory; it’s good for his health.
    We often underestimate the extent to which movies affect our lives psychologically. With moderation and an extended knowledge of reality, we can ensure that we know just what we’re up against the next time we watch Halloween or Pinocchio.

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