The Pow Wow Forum

The Apache Pow Wow


    station fire by andrew lin

    Share

    sallychung

    Posts : 59
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    station fire by andrew lin

    Post  sallychung on Thu Sep 10, 2009 10:27 am

    Should investigators confirm that the Station Fire was indeed man-made, the arsonist could face the death penalty. Though not much has been released concerning the details of what officials have found, as it could possibly hurt chances of apprehending the criminal, it has been established that pool-like burn patterns and a foreign substance, both indications of the presence of an accelerant such as gasoline, were found at the suspected origin of the Station Fire.
    Whether the arsonist gets two years in prison or the death penalty all depends on one thing: intent. Because two firefighters died in their effort to halt the inferno, the case is being treated as a homicide. Should the blaze have been an accident, the result of, say, a smoldering cigarette, then the arsonist could be charged with involuntary manslaughter, for which the minimum sentence is two years. However, as authorities admit, the possibility that the fire was an accident is highly unlikely, or as one anonymous source connected with the investigation said, “There was material that didn't belong there. It was clear evidence that the fire was intentionally set.” Thus it could be a contest between whether the person should be charged with first or secondary degree murder or voluntary manslaughter, which carries with it a 20-year sentence. And though Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger initially set the reward for finding the arsonist at $100,000, it is, as of Sept. 8, $150,000.
    Intentional or no, however, the damage has been wrought. First spotted Aug. 26 at Mile Marker 29 along the Angeles Crest Highway, up in the mountains north of La Canada Flintridge, which is twenty minutes north and west of Arcadia, the Station Fire advanced into the densely populated neighborhoods to the south. On Aug. 27 and 28, the first evacuations in Palos Verdes Peninsula and La Canada Flintridge were called, and evacuation centers were erected at various places in the area, including at Crescenta Valley High School. As orders for evacuation exceeded the thousands, around 6,600 by Aug. 31, to be exact, reports poured in of frantic families carrying nothing but a few belongings and their pets underarm into emergency shelters.
    Though, not all were compliant with evacuation orders. For example, half the residents of Acton, a semi-rural community up near the fire, dug in and decided to stay, while residents of La Crescenta formed neighborhood watch groups called “ember shifts,” designed to spot and respond to embers that may wander into town. Of course, officials expressed dismay, particularly Gov. Schwarzenegger, who cited as examples three people who were injured in Big Tujunga Canyon the day before because they refused to evacuate.
    By Aug. 31, the fire had roughly reached the height of its nastiness, with firefighters having only been able to contain 5% of the fire, 74 structures destroyed, and with the eastern flank advancing towards the historic Mount Wilson Observatory and all its neighboring radio communications facilities. Once over the hump however, the firefighters managed to stomp back the wall that threatened Mount Wilson in an epic three day battle, which ended Sept. 3. By Sept. 7, the fire was 56% contained.
    It was on Sept. 7 that the Station Fire got as close to us as it ever would, with firefighters conducting controlled burns above Monrovia and Arcadia.

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: station fire by andrew lin

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Fri Sep 11, 2009 1:45 am

    Should investigators confirm that the Station Fire was indeed man-made, the arsonist could face the death penalty. Though not much has been released concerning the details of what officials have found, as it could possibly hurt chances of apprehending the criminal, it has been established that pool-like burn patterns and a foreign substance, both indications of the presence of an accelerant such as gasoline, were found at the suspected origin of the Station Fire.
    Whether the arsonist gets two years in prison or the death penalty all depends on one thing: intent. Because two firefighters died in their effort to halt the inferno, the case is being treated as a homicide. Should the blaze have been an accident, the result of, say, a smoldering cigarette, then the arsonist could be charged with involuntary manslaughter, for which the minimum sentence is two years. However, as authorities admit, the possibility that the fire was an accident is highly unlikely, or as one anonymous source connected with the investigation said, “There was material that didn't belong there. It was clear evidence that the fire was intentionally set.” Thus it could be a contest between whether the person should be charged with first or secondary degree murder or voluntary manslaughter, which carries with it a 20-year sentence. And though Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger initially set the reward for finding the arsonist at $100,000, it is, as of Sept. 8, $150,000.
    Intentional or no, however, the damage has been wrought. First spotted Aug. 26 at Mile Marker 29 along the Angeles Crest Highway, up in the mountains north of La Canada Flintridge, which is twenty minutes north and west of Arcadia, the Station Fire advanced into the densely populated neighborhoods to the south. On Aug. 27 and 28, the first evacuations in Palos Verdes Peninsula and La Canada Flintridge were called, and evacuation centers were erected at various places in the area, including at Crescenta Valley High School. As orders for evacuation exceeded the thousands, around 6,600 by Aug. 31, to be exact, reports poured in of frantic families carrying nothing but a few belongings and their pets underarm into emergency shelters.
    Though, not all were compliant with evacuation orders. For example, half the residents of Acton, a semi-rural community up near the fire, dug in and decided to stay, while residents of La Crescenta formed neighborhood watch groups called “ember shifts,” designed to spot and respond to embers that may wander into town. Of course, officials expressed dismay, particularly Gov. Schwarzenegger, who cited as examples three people who were injured in Big Tujunga Canyon the day before because they refused to evacuate.
    By Aug. 31, the fire had roughly reached the height of its nastiness, with firefighters having only been able to contain 5% of the fire, 74 structures destroyed, and with the eastern flank advancing towards the historic Mount Wilson Observatory and all its neighboring radio communications facilities. Once over the hump however, the firefighters managed to stomp back the wall that threatened Mount Wilson in an epic three day battle, which ended Sept. 3. By Sept. 7, the fire was 56% contained.
    It was on Sept. 7 that [when] the Station Fire got as close to us as it ever would, with firefighters conducting controlled burns above Monrovia and Arcadia.

    andrewlin

    Posts : 35
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    next draft

    Post  andrewlin on Tue Sep 15, 2009 11:58 pm

    Should investigators confirm that the Station Fire was indeed man-made, the arsonist could face the death penalty. Though not much has been released concerning the details of what officials have found, as it could possibly hurt chances of apprehending the criminal, it has been established that pool-like burn patterns and a foreign substance, both indications of the presence of an accelerant such as gasoline, were found at the suspected origin of the Station Fire.
    Whether the arsonist gets two years in prison or the death penalty all depends on one thing: intent. Because two firefighters died in their effort to halt the inferno, the case is being treated as a homicide. Should the blaze have been an accident, the result of, say, a smoldering cigarette, then the arsonist could be charged with involuntary manslaughter, for which the minimum sentence is two years. However, as authorities admit, the possibility that the fire was an accident is highly unlikely, or as one anonymous source connected with the investigation said, “There was material that didn't belong there. It was clear evidence that the fire was intentionally set.” Thus it could be a contest between whether the person should be charged with first or secondary degree murder or voluntary manslaughter, which carries with it a 20-year sentence. And though Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger initially set the reward for finding the arsonist at $100,000, it is, as of Sept. 8, $150,000.
    Intentional or no, however, the damage has been wrought. First spotted Aug. 26 at Mile Marker 29 along the Angeles Crest Highway, up in the mountains north of La Canada Flintridge, which is twenty minutes north and west of Arcadia, the Station Fire advanced into the densely populated neighborhoods to the south. On Aug. 27 and 28, the first evacuations in Palos Verdes Peninsula and La Canada Flintridge were called, and evacuation centers were erected at various places in the area, including at Crescenta Valley High School. As orders for evacuation exceeded the thousands, around 6,600 by Aug. 31, to be exact, reports poured in of frantic families carrying nothing but a few belongings and their pets underarm into emergency shelters. “I packed valuables, such as my cello, important papers, pictures—only the really personal ones—and my dog,” admitted Ashley Park, a senior at Crescenta Valley High School, “When leaving the house, I went through most of the rooms thinking ‘wow… this may be the last time I’m seeing whatever's here.’”
    Though, not all were compliant with evacuation orders. For example, half the residents of Acton, a semi-rural community up near the fire, dug in and decided to stay, while residents of La Crescenta formed neighborhood watch groups called “ember shifts,” designed to spot and respond to embers that may wander into town. Of course, officials expressed dismay, particularly Gov. Schwarzenegger, who cited as examples three people who were injured in Big Tujunga Canyon the day before because they refused to evacuate.
    By Aug. 31, the fire had roughly reached the height of its nastiness, with firefighters having only been able to contain 5% of the fire, 74 structures destroyed, and with the eastern flank advancing towards the historic Mount Wilson Observatory and all its neighboring radio communications facilities. Once over the hump however, the firefighters managed to stomp back the wall that threatened Mount Wilson in an epic three day battle, which ended Sept. 3. “Thankfully, the Observatory went unscathed. It’s a landmark in the physics world,” said senior Timofey Semenov. By Sept. 7, the fire was 56% contained.
    It was during the week of Sept. 7 when the Station Fire got as close to us as it ever would, with firefighters conducting controlled burns above Monrovia and Arcadia, releasing plumes of gray smoke. “I was worried the fires had reached the Foothills area,” confessed junior Coleen Ju, “I’m relieved I was wrong.” By Sept. 15 the blaze was 91% contained.
    And so [ INSERT DATE FIRE ENDS ], with the once roaring blaze now de-clawed and toothless, firefighters stamped out the last remaining embers, ending the Station Fire’s month-long reign of terror over the southland. And though it left its indelible mark on Los Angeles in the way of over 80 houses destroyed, 100 million dollars in disaster response, and the passing of 2 firefighters, Los Angeles persists.

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: station fire by andrew lin

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Wed Sep 16, 2009 6:23 pm

    Should investigators confirm that the Station Fire was indeed man-made, the arsonist could face the death penalty. Though not much has been released concerning the details of what officials have found, as it could possibly hurt chances of apprehending the criminal, it has been established that pool-like burn patterns and a foreign substance, both indications of the presence of an accelerant such as gasoline, were found at the suspected origin of the Station Fire.
    Whether the arsonist gets two years in prison or the death penalty all depends on one thing: intent. Because two firefighters died in their effort to halt the inferno, the case is being treated as a homicide. Should the blaze have been an accident, the result of, say, a smoldering cigarette, then the arsonist could be charged with involuntary manslaughter, for which the minimum sentence is two years. However, as authorities admit, the possibility that the fire was an accident is highly unlikely, or as one anonymous source connected with the investigation said, “There was material that didn't belong there. It was clear evidence that the fire was intentionally set.” Thus it could be a contest between whether the person should be charged with first or secondary degree murder or voluntary manslaughter, which carries with it a 20-year sentence. And though Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger initially set the reward for finding the arsonist at $100,000, it is, as of Sept. 8, $150,000.
    Intentional or no [not] , however, the damage has been wrought. First spotted Aug. 26 at Mile Marker 29 along the Angeles Crest Highway, up in the mountains north of La Canada Flintridge, which is twenty minutes north and west of Arcadia, the Station Fire advanced into the densely populated neighborhoods to the south. On Aug. 27 and 28, the first evacuations in Palos Verdes Peninsula and La Canada Flintridge were called, and evacuation centers were erected at various places in the area, including at Crescenta Valley High School. As orders for evacuation exceeded the thousands, around 6,600 by Aug. 31, to be exact, reports poured in of frantic families carrying nothing but a few belongings and their pets underarm into emergency shelters. “I packed valuables, such as my cello, important papers, pictures—only the really personal ones—and my dog,” admitted Ashley Park, a senior at Crescenta Valley High School, “When leaving the house, I went through most of the rooms thinking ‘wow… this may be the last time I’m seeing whatever's here.’”
    Though, not all were compliant with evacuation orders. For example, half the residents of Acton, a semi-rural community up near the fire, dug in and decided to stay, while residents of La Crescenta formed neighborhood watch groups called “ember shifts,” designed to spot and respond to embers that may wander into town. Of course, officials expressed dismay, particularly Gov. Schwarzenegger, who cited as examples three people who were injured in Big Tujunga Canyon the day before because they refused to evacuate.
    By Aug. 31, the fire had roughly reached the height of its nastiness, with firefighters having only been able to contain 5% of the fire, 74 structures destroyed, and with the eastern flank advancing towards the historic Mount Wilson Observatory and all its neighboring radio communications facilities. Once over the hump however, the firefighters managed to stomp back the wall that threatened Mount Wilson in an epic three day battle, which ended Sept. 3. “Thankfully, the Observatory went unscathed. It’s a landmark in the physics world,” said senior Timofey Semenov. By Sept. 7, the fire was 56% contained.
    It was during the week of Sept. 7 when the Station Fire got as close to us as it ever would, with firefighters conducting controlled burns above Monrovia and Arcadia, releasing plumes of gray smoke. “I was worried the fires had reached the Foothills area,” confessed junior Coleen Ju, “I’m relieved I was wrong.” By Sept. 15 the blaze was 91% contained.
    And so [ INSERT DATE FIRE ENDS ], with the once roaring blaze now de-clawed and toothless, firefighters stamped out the last remaining embers, ending the Station Fire’s month-long reign of terror over the southland. And though it left its indelible mark on Los Angeles in the way of over 80 houses destroyed, 100 million dollars in disaster response, and the passing of 2 firefighters, Los Angeles persists.

    Joanna Shen

    Posts : 87
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: station fire by andrew lin

    Post  Joanna Shen on Wed Sep 23, 2009 5:30 pm

    Should investigators confirm that the Station Fire was indeed man-made, the arsonist could face the death penalty. Though not much has been released concerning the details of what officials have found, it has been established that pool-like burn patterns and a foreign substance, both indications of the presence of an accelerant such as gasoline, were found at the suspected origin of the Station Fire.
    Whether the arsonist gets two years in prison or the death penalty all depends on one thing: intent. Because two firefighters died in their effort to halt the inferno, the case is being treated as a homicide. Should the blaze have been an accident, the result of, say, a smoldering cigarette, then the arsonist could be charged with involuntary manslaughter, for which the minimum sentence is two years. However, as authorities admit, the possibility that the fire was an accident is highly unlikely. One anonymous source said, “There was material that didn’t belong there. It was clear evidence that the fire was intentionally set.” Thus, it could be a contest between whether the person should be charged with first or secondary degree murder or voluntary manslaughter, which carries with it a 20-year sentence. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger initially set the reward for finding the arsonist at $100,000. The number is now at $150,000.
    Intentional or not, however, the damage has been wrought. First spotted Aug. 26 at Mile Marker 29 along the Angeles Crest Highway, up in the mountains north of La Canada Flintridge, which is twenty minutes north and west of Arcadia, the Station Fire advanced into the densely populated neighborhoods to the south. On Aug. 27 and 28, the first evacuations in Palos Verdes Peninsula and La Canada Flintridge were called, and evacuation centers were erected at various places in the area, including at Crescenta Valley High School. As orders for evacuation exceeded 6,000 by Aug. 31, to be exact, reports poured in of frantic families carrying nothing but a few belongings and their pets underarm into emergency shelters.
    However, not all were compliant with evacuation orders. Half the residents of Acton, a community near the fire, dug in and decided to stay, while residents of La Crescenta formed neighborhood watch groups called “ember shifts,” designed to spot and respond to embers that may wander into town. Of course, officials expressed dismay, particularly Gov. Schwarzenegger, who cited that three people were injured in Big Tujunga Canyon because they refused to evacuate as reasons to follow regulations.
    By Aug. 31, the fire had roughly reached the height of its nastiness, with firefighters having only been able to contain 5% of the fire. 74 structures were destroyed and the eastern flank was advancing towards the historic Mount Wilson Observatory and all its neighboring radio communications facilities. Once over the hump however, the firefighters managed to stomp back the wall that threatened Mount Wilson in an epic three-day battle, which ended Sept. 3. By Sept. 7, the fire was 56% contained.
    It was on Sept. 7 that the Station Fire got as close to us as it ever would, with firefighters conducting controlled burns above Monrovia and Arcadia, containing the fire to 91%.

    andrewlin

    Posts : 35
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    final

    Post  andrewlin on Wed Sep 23, 2009 8:48 pm

    Should investigators confirm that the Station Fire was indeed man-made, the arsonist could face the death penalty. Though not much has been released concerning the details of what officials have found, as it could possibly hurt chances of apprehending the criminal, it has been established that pool-like burn patterns and a foreign substance, both indications of the presence of an accelerant such as gasoline, were found at the suspected origin of the Station Fire.
    Whether the arsonist gets two years in prison or the death penalty all depends on one thing: intent. Because two firefighters died in their effort to halt the inferno, the case is being treated as a homicide. Should the blaze have been an accident, the result of, say, a smoldering cigarette, then the arsonist could be charged with involuntary manslaughter, for which the minimum sentence is two years. However, as authorities admit, the possibility that the fire was an accident is highly unlikely, or as one anonymous source connected with the investigation said, “There was material that didn't belong there. It was clear evidence that the fire was intentionally set.” Thus it could be a contest between whether the person should be charged with first or secondary degree murder or voluntary manslaughter, which carries with it a 20-year sentence. And though Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger initially set the reward for finding the arsonist at $100,000, it is, as of Sept. 8, $150,000.
    Intentional or not , however, the damage has been wrought. First spotted Aug. 26 at Mile Marker 29 along the Angeles Crest Highway, up in the mountains north of La Canada Flintridge, which is twenty minutes north and west of Arcadia, the Station Fire advanced into the densely populated neighborhoods to the south. On Aug. 27 and 28, the first evacuations in Palos Verdes Peninsula and La Canada Flintridge were called, and evacuation centers were erected at various places in the area, including at Crescenta Valley High School. As orders for evacuation exceeded the thousands, around 6,600 by Aug. 31, to be exact, reports poured in of frantic families carrying nothing but a few belongings and their pets underarm into emergency shelters. “I packed valuables, such as my cello, important papers, pictures—only the really personal ones—and my dog,” admitted Ashley Park, a senior at Crescenta Valley High School, “When leaving the house, I went through most of the rooms thinking ‘wow… this may be the last time I’m seeing whatever's here.’”
    Though, not all were compliant with evacuation orders. For example, half the residents of Acton, a semi-rural community up near the fire, dug in and decided to stay, while residents of La Crescenta formed neighborhood watch groups called “ember shifts,” designed to spot and respond to embers that may wander into town. Of course, officials expressed dismay, particularly Gov. Schwarzenegger, who cited as examples three people who were injured in Big Tujunga Canyon the day before because they refused to evacuate.
    By Aug. 31, the fire had roughly reached the height of its nastiness, with firefighters having only been able to contain 5% of the fire, 74 structures destroyed, and with the eastern flank advancing towards the historic Mount Wilson Observatory and all its neighboring radio communications facilities. Once over the hump however, the firefighters managed to stomp back the wall that threatened Mount Wilson in an epic three day battle, which ended Sept. 3. “Thankfully, the Observatory went unscathed. It’s a landmark in the physics world,” said senior Timofey Semenov. By Sept. 7, the fire was 56% contained.
    It was during the week of Sept. 7 when the Station Fire got as close to us as it ever would, with firefighters conducting controlled burns above Monrovia and Arcadia, releasing plumes of gray smoke. “I was worried the fires had reached the Foothills area,” confessed junior Coleen Ju, “I’m relieved I was wrong.” By Sept. 15 the blaze was 91% contained, and a week later, in a final display of defiance, the fire rode the Santa Ana winds to negligible effect.
    And so Sept. 25, with the once roaring blaze now de-clawed and toothless, firefighters reached full containment, ending the Station Fire’s month-long reign of terror over the southland. And though it left its indelible mark on Los Angeles in the way of over 80 houses destroyed, 100 million dollars in disaster response, and the passing of 2 firefighters, Los Angeles persists.

    Sponsored content

    Re: station fire by andrew lin

    Post  Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Sun Oct 22, 2017 2:07 am