The Pow Wow Forum

The Apache Pow Wow


    Payroll Fiscal Crisis

    Share

    justinpark

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-09-02
    Age : 22

    Payroll Fiscal Crisis

    Post  justinpark on Mon Apr 12, 2010 11:07 am

    By: Justin Park


    A problem in the fiscal crisis has emerged, one that the Los Angeles government have been trying to ignore. However, because the nation is in the worst economic decline since the Depression, it has become impossible to overlook the problem of the city's payroll. Los Angeles' work force has increased in numbers by 2,000 to 3,000 people from the years 2000 through 2009. The city government plans to save the city from the menacing $212 million budget deficit that, if the economy continues with this demeanor, could steadily rise to a $1 billion budget deficit within an expanse of four years.


    The city's $4.4 billion general fund pays for city services such as the police and fire departments, parks, and libraries. However, the general fund also faces a grisly amount of budget deficit that could cut the fund by a fourth if the fiscal crisis remains. To aid in covering the city's bills, the city government has turned to other means of raising more money to fight off the budget deficit crisis. They have reached beyond staple tax revenue collections by liquidating city property, raising parking meter and trash service fees, and also by diverting revenue from the Department of Water and Power (DWP).


    The DWP has provided the city budget with $2.7 billion through the collection of electric bills since 1992. However, if the DWP withholds a $73 million payment to the general fund, the city government could run dry on money. Recently, the Acting DWP General Manager Raman Raj favored rejecting the money transfer for the city council turned down a suggested increase in electric bills. Acting DWP General Manager Raj said it put the DWP's financial outlook in "significant jeopardy".


    Now Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the Council have few options to clear the county from the fiscal crisis that it has been stuck in for several years. The Los Angeles voters are undoubtedly unwilling to vote for a raise in tax. So far, Mayor Villaraigosa and the Council have authorized the elimination of about 4,000 jobs, along with the 2,400 workers allowed to retired earlier than usual.


    This year, a projected $6 million will be saved through the cancellation of so far, 100 jobs along with the transferal of some jobs to certain ones that are paid for by special funding. The city also saw $26 million more in revenue from property taxes, which show that taxes are increasing once again. The payroll budget deficit has been dealt with through the cutting of jobs along with raising taxes. Los Angeles has never been in such a fiscal crisis and the only chance of clearing the major amounts of debt are to do what general civilians despise most, reduce jobs and augment taxes—all for the goodwill of the county.


    The Fiscal Crisis Continues

    Fighting the Problematic Economy

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Payroll Fiscal Crisis

    Post  reginaliu on Thu Apr 15, 2010 5:29 pm

    A problem in the fiscal crisis has emerged, one that the Los Angeles government have [has] been trying to ignore. However, because the nation is in the worst economic decline since the Depression, it has become impossible to overlook the problem of the city's payroll. Los Angeles' work force has increased in numbers by 2,000 to 3,000 people from the years 2000 through 2009. The city government plans to save the city from the menacing $212 million budget deficit that, if the economy continues with this demeanor, could steadily rise to a $1 billion budget deficit within an expanse of four years.


    The city's $4.4 billion general fund pays for city services such as the police and fire departments, parks, and libraries. However, the general fund also faces a grisly amount of budget deficit that could cut the fund by a fourth if the fiscal crisis remains. To aid in covering the city's bills, the city government has turned to other means of raising more money to fight off the budget deficit crisis. They have reached beyond staple tax revenue collections by liquidating city property, raising parking meter and trash service fees, and also by diverting revenue from the Department of Water and Power (DWP).


    The DWP has provided the city budget with $2.7 billion through the collection of electric bills since 1992. However, if the DWP withholds a $73 million payment to the general fund, the city government could run dry on money. Recently, the Acting DWP General Manager Raman Raj favored rejecting the money transfer for the city council [and] turned down a suggested increase in electric bills. Acting DWP General Manager Raj said it put the DWP's financial outlook in "significant jeopardy". [period inside quotation marks]


    Now Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the Council have few options to clear the county from the fiscal crisis that it has been stuck in for several years. The Los Angeles voters are undoubtedly unwilling to vote for a raise in tax. So far, Mayor Villaraigosa and the Council have authorized the elimination of about 4,000 jobs, along with the 2,400 workers allowed to retired earlier than usual.


    This year, a projected $6 million will be saved through the cancellation of so far, 100 jobs along with the transferal of some jobs to certain ones that are paid for by special funding. The city also saw $26 million more in revenue from property taxes, which show that taxes are increasing once again. The payroll budget deficit has been dealt with through the cutting of jobs along with raising taxes. Los Angeles has never been in such a fiscal crisis and the only chance of clearing the major amounts of debt are to do what general civilians despise most, reduce jobs and augment taxes—all for the goodwill [good] of the county.

    justinpark

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-09-02
    Age : 22

    Re: Payroll Fiscal Crisis

    Post  justinpark on Sun Apr 18, 2010 10:02 am

    A problem in the fiscal crisis has emerged, one that the Los Angeles government has been trying to ignore. However, because the nation is in the worst economic decline since the Depression, it has become impossible to overlook the problem of the city's payroll. Los Angeles' work force has increased in numbers by 2,000 to 3,000 people from the years 2000 through 2009. The city government plans to save the city from the menacing $212 million budget deficit that, if the economy continues with this demeanor, could steadily rise to a $1 billion budget deficit within an expanse of four years.


    The city's $4.4 billion general fund pays for city services such as the police and fire departments, parks, and libraries. However, the general fund also faces a grisly amount of budget deficit that could cut the fund by a fourth if the fiscal crisis remains. To aid in covering the city's bills, the city government has turned to other means of raising more money to fight off the budget deficit crisis. They have reached beyond staple tax revenue collections by liquidating city property, raising parking meter and trash service fees, and also by diverting revenue from the Department of Water and Power (DWP).


    The DWP has provided the city budget with $2.7 billion through the collection of electric bills since 1992. However, if the DWP withholds a $73 million payment to the general fund, the city government could run dry on money. Recently, the Acting DWP General Manager Raman Raj favored rejecting the money transfer for the city council [and] turned down a suggested increase in electric bills. Acting DWP General Manager Raj said it put the DWP's financial outlook in "significant jeopardy."


    Now Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the Council have few options to clear the county from the fiscal crisis that it has been stuck in for several years. The Los Angeles voters are undoubtedly unwilling to vote for a raise in tax. So far, Mayor Villaraigosa and the Council have authorized the elimination of about 4,000 jobs, along with the 2,400 workers allowed to retired earlier than usual.


    This year, a projected $6 million will be saved through the cancellation of so far, 100 jobs along with the transferal of some jobs to certain ones that are paid for by special funding. The city also saw $26 million more in revenue from property taxes, which show that taxes are increasing once again. The payroll budget deficit has been dealt with through the cutting of jobs along with raising taxes. Los Angeles has never been in such a fiscal crisis and the only chance of clearing the major amounts of debt are to do what general civilians despise most, reduce jobs and augment taxes—all for the good of the county.

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Payroll Fiscal Crisis

    Post  reginaliu on Sun Apr 18, 2010 10:42 am

    A problem in the fiscal crisis has emerged, one that the Los Angeles government has been trying to ignore. However, because the nation is in the worst economic decline since the Depression, it has become impossible to overlook the problem of the city's payroll. Los Angeles' work force has increased in numbers by [from] 2,000 to 3,000 people from the years 2000 through 2009. The city government plans to save the city from the menacing $212 million budget deficit that, if the economy continues with this demeanor, could steadily rise to a $1 billion budget deficit within an expanse of four years.


    The city's $4.4 billion general fund pays for city services such as the police and fire departments, parks, and libraries. However, the general fund also faces a grisly amount of budget deficit that could cut the fund by a fourth if the fiscal crisis remains. To aid in covering the city's bills, the city government has turned to other means of raising more money to fight off the budget deficit crisis. They have reached beyond staple tax revenue collections by liquidating city property, raising parking meter and trash service fees, and also by diverting revenue from the Department of Water and Power (DWP).


    The DWP has provided the city budget with $2.7 billion through the collection of electric bills since 1992. However, if the DWP withholds a $73 million payment to the general fund, the city government could run dry on money. Recently, the Acting DWP General Manager Raman Raj favored rejecting the money transfer for the city council [and] [delete brackets] turned down a suggested increase in electric bills. Acting DWP General Manager Raj said it put the DWP's financial outlook in "significant jeopardy."


    Now Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the Council have few options to clear the county from the fiscal crisis that it has been stuck in for several years. The Los Angeles voters are undoubtedly unwilling to vote for a raise in tax. So far, Mayor Villaraigosa and the Council have authorized the elimination of about 4,000 jobs, along with the 2,400 workers allowed to retired earlier than usual.


    This year, a projected $6 million will be saved through the cancellation of so far, 100 jobs along with the transferal of some jobs to certain ones that are paid for by special funding. The city also saw $26 million more in revenue from property taxes, which show that taxes are increasing once again. The payroll budget deficit has been dealt with through the cutting of jobs along with raising taxes. Los Angeles has never been in such a fiscal crisis and the only chance of clearing the major amounts of debt are to do what general civilians despise most, reduce jobs and augment taxes—all for the good of the county.

    justinpark

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-09-02
    Age : 22

    Re: Payroll Fiscal Crisis

    Post  justinpark on Sun Apr 18, 2010 5:09 pm

    A problem in the fiscal crisis has emerged, one that the Los Angeles government has been trying to ignore. However, because the nation is in the worst economic decline since the Depression, it has become impossible to overlook the problem of the city's payroll. Los Angeles' work force has increased in numbers from 2,000 to 3,000 people from the years 2000 through 2009. The city government plans to save the city from the menacing $212 million budget deficit that, if the economy continues with this demeanor, could steadily rise to a $1 billion budget deficit within an expanse of four years.


    The city's $4.4 billion general fund pays for city services such as the police and fire departments, parks, and libraries. However, the general fund also faces a grisly amount of budget deficit that could cut the fund by a fourth if the fiscal crisis remains. To aid in covering the city's bills, the city government has turned to other means of raising more money to fight off the budget deficit crisis. They have reached beyond staple tax revenue collections by liquidating city property, raising parking meter and trash service fees, and also by diverting revenue from the Department of Water and Power (DWP).


    The DWP has provided the city budget with $2.7 billion through the collection of electric bills since 1992. However, if the DWP withholds a $73 million payment to the general fund, the city government could run dry on money. Recently, the Acting DWP General Manager Raman Raj favored rejecting the money transfer for the city council and turned down a suggested increase in electric bills. Acting DWP General Manager Raj said it put the DWP's financial outlook in "significant jeopardy."


    Now Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the Council have few options to clear the county from the fiscal crisis that it has been stuck in for several years. The Los Angeles voters are undoubtedly unwilling to vote for a raise in tax. So far, Mayor Villaraigosa and the Council have authorized the elimination of about 4,000 jobs, along with the 2,400 workers allowed to retired earlier than usual.


    This year, a projected $6 million will be saved through the cancellation of so far, 100 jobs along with the transferal of some jobs to certain ones that are paid for by special funding. The city also saw $26 million more in revenue from property taxes, which show that taxes are increasing once again. The payroll budget deficit has been dealt with through the cutting of jobs along with raising taxes. Los Angeles has never been in such a fiscal crisis and the only chance of clearing the major amounts of debt are to do what general civilians despise most, reduce jobs and augment taxes—all for the good of the county.

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Payroll Fiscal Crisis

    Post  reginaliu on Sun Apr 18, 2010 9:46 pm

    A problem in the fiscal crisis has emerged, one that the Los Angeles government has been trying to ignore. However, because the nation is in the worst economic decline since the Depression, it has become impossible to overlook the problem of the city's payroll. Los Angeles' work force has increased in numbers from 2,000 to 3,000 people from the years 2000 through 2009. The city government plans to save the city from the menacing $212 million budget deficit that, if the economy continues with this demeanor, could steadily rise to a $1 billion budget deficit within an expanse of four years.


    The city's $4.4 billion general fund pays for city services such as the police and fire departments, parks, and libraries. However, the general fund also faces a grisly amount of budget deficit that could cut the fund by a fourth if the fiscal crisis remains. To aid in covering the city's bills, the city government has turned to other means of raising more money to fight off the budget deficit crisis. They have reached beyond staple tax revenue collections by liquidating city property, raising parking meter and trash service fees, and also by diverting revenue from the Department of Water and Power (DWP).


    The DWP has provided the city budget with $2.7 billion through the collection of electric bills since 1992. However, if the DWP withholds a $73 million payment to the general fund, the city government could run dry on money. Recently, the Acting DWP General Manager Raman Raj favored rejecting the money transfer for the city council and turned down a suggested increase in electric bills. Acting DWP General Manager Raj said it put the DWP's financial outlook in "significant jeopardy."


    Now Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the Council have few options to clear the county from the fiscal crisis that it has been stuck in for several years. The Los Angeles voters are undoubtedly unwilling to vote for a raise in tax. So far, Mayor Villaraigosa and the Council have authorized the elimination of about 4,000 jobs, along with the 2,400 workers allowed to retired earlier than usual.


    This year, a projected $6 million will be saved through the cancellation of so far, 100 jobs along with the transferal of some jobs to certain ones that are paid for by special funding. The city also saw $26 million more in revenue from property taxes, which show that taxes are increasing once again. The payroll budget deficit has been dealt with through the cutting of jobs along with raising taxes. Los Angeles has never been in such a fiscal crisis and the only chance of clearing the major amounts of debt are to do what general civilians despise most, reduce jobs and augment taxes—all for the good of the county.

    no changes

    justinpark

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-09-02
    Age : 22

    Re: Payroll Fiscal Crisis

    Post  justinpark on Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:59 pm

    By: Justin Park

    A problem in the fiscal crisis has emerged, one that the Los Angeles government have been trying to ignore. However, because the nation is in the worst economic decline since the Depression, it has become impossible to overlook the problem of the city's payroll. Los Angeles' work force has increased in numbers by 2,000 to 3,000 people from the years 2000 through 2009. The city government plans to save the city from the menacing $212 million budget deficit that, if the economy continues with this demeanor, could steadily rise to a $1 billion budget deficit within an expanse of four years.

    The city's $4.4 billion general fund pays for city services such as the police and fire departments, parks, and libraries. However, the general fund also faces a grisly amount of budget deficit that could cut the fund by a fourth if the fiscal crisis remains. To aid in covering the city's bills, the city government has turned to other means of raising more money to fight off the budget deficit crisis. They have reached beyond staple tax revenue collections by liquidating city property, raising parking meter and trash service fees, and also by diverting revenue from the Department of Water and Power (DWP). Freshman Elbert Wang believes that, "During this economic recession, California must increase taxes, find a reliable source of income, and limit salary increases in order to close the budget deficit."


    The DWP has provided the city budget with $2.7 billion through the collection of electric bills since 1992. However, if the DWP withholds a $73 million payment to the general fund, the city government could run dry on money. Recently, the Acting DWP General Manager Raman Raj favored rejecting the money transfer for the city council turned down a suggested increase in electric bills. Acting DWP General Manager Raj said it put the DWP's financial outlook in "significant jeopardy".

    Now Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the Council have few options to clear the county from the fiscal crisis that it has been stuck in for several years. The Los Angeles voters are undoubtedly unwilling to vote for a raise in tax. So far, Mayor Villaraigosa and the Council have authorized the elimination of about 4,000 jobs, along with the 2,400 workers allowed to retired earlier than usual. "I believe that although our economy may be recovering at a gradual pace, the elimination of jobs will make our efforts futile; however, I believe that these acts must be made for they are necessary to fight the new fiscal crisis that has emerged," said freshman Eric Gao.

    This year, a projected $6 million will be saved through the cancellation of so far, 100 jobs along with the transferal of some jobs to certain ones that are paid for by special funding. The city also saw $26 million more in revenue from property taxes, which show that taxes are increasing once again. The payroll budget deficit has been dealt with through the cutting of jobs along with raising taxes. Los Angeles has never been in such a fiscal crisis and the only chance of clearing the major amounts of debt are to do what general civilians despise most, reduce jobs and augment taxes—all for the goodwill of the county.

    The Fiscal Crisis Continues
    Fighting the Problematic Economy

    Sponsored content

    Re: Payroll Fiscal Crisis

    Post  Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Sat Jul 22, 2017 2:33 pm