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    andrewchang

    Posts : 38
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    California STAR Testing

    Post  andrewchang on Mon Sep 07, 2009 10:58 pm

    California’s standardized test results have never been particularly impressive—but they’re improving. The 2009 STAR testing results, released as a whole on August 20 by State Superintendent Jack O’Connell, indicated a continuation of the upward trend which California test scores have seen in the last seven years. 2009 marked the first year where over 50% of students were proficient in the Language Arts, up from 46% in 2008. “I am pleased and encouraged to see that for the seventh year in a row, California public school students continue to improve,” remarked O’Connell in an interview regarding the latest release of scores.

    In 2003, state proficiency scores in the language arts and mathematics peaked at a lowly 35%. Given this clear problem, the state decided to change its standardized testing apparatus, aligning it to meet specific state academic standards. Since then, the number has been on a steady incline—and we can only hope for the continuation of this trend. “When I first saw that our proficiency was only at 50%, I thought we were doing badly,” remarked senior Austin Ho, “but when I found out that we were actually improving I was proud.”

    But as junior Justine Lee put it best: “Our scores may be rising, but not fast enough.” And the problem may be in a factor not yet investigated. “It seems like many people just don’t care about the STAR test,” laughed senior Andrew Taylor, “and I know for a fact that I didn’t do as well as I could have simply because I thought it didn’t really matter.” The lack of incentive for students to do well on STAR testing may very well be the reason for our state’s lackluster performance as a whole; as the only test not affecting one’s individual success as a college applicant, the STAR test ends up commonly taking a backseat to higher priorities in students’ lives.

    In the end, the answer to another step in vast improvement can be speculated to lie in simply taking the test seriously. But even at its current rate, our state test score improvements leave little room for complaint. We can only hope that California’s STARs will continue to shine.

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: California STAR Testing

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Fri Sep 11, 2009 2:05 am

    California’s standardized test results have never been particularly impressive—but they’re improving. The 2009 STAR testing results, released as a whole on August 20 by State Superintendent Jack O’Connell, indicated a continuation of the upward trend which California test scores have seen in the last seven years. 2009 marked the first year where over 50% of students were proficient in the Language Arts, up from 46% in 2008. “I am pleased and encouraged to see that for the seventh year in a row, California public school students continue to improve,” remarked O’Connell in an interview regarding the latest release of scores.

    In 2003, state proficiency scores in the language arts [Language Arts] and mathematics [Mathematics] peaked at a lowly 35%. Given this clear problem, the state decided to change its standardized testing apparatus, aligning it to meet specific state academic standards. Since then, the number has been on a steady incline—and we can only hope for the continuation of this trend. “When I first saw that our proficiency was only at 50%, I thought we were doing badly,” remarked senior Austin Ho, “but when I found out that we were actually improving [add comma] I was proud.”

    But as junior Justine Lee put it best: “Our scores may be rising, but not fast enough.” And the problem may be in a factor not yet investigated. “It seems like many people just don’t care about the STAR test,” laughed senior Andrew Taylor, “and I know for a fact that I didn’t do as well as I could have simply because I thought it didn’t really matter.” The lack of incentive for students to do well on STAR testing may very well be the reason for our state’s lackluster performance as a whole; as the only test not affecting one’s individual success as a college applicant, the STAR test ends up commonly taking a backseat to higher priorities in students’ lives.

    In the end, the answer to another step in vast improvement can be speculated to lie in simply taking the test seriously. But [add comma] even at its current rate, our state test score improvements leave little room for complaint. We can only hope that California’s STARs will continue to shine.

    andrewchang

    Posts : 38
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    DRAFT 2

    Post  andrewchang on Mon Sep 14, 2009 1:18 am

    California’s standardized test results have never been particularly impressive—but they’re improving. And in the context of improvement, whether schoolwide or statewide, we’ve always reached our goals. The 2009 STAR testing results, released as a whole on August 20 by State Superintendent Jack O’Connell, indicated a continuation of the upward trend which California test scores have seen in the last seven years. “I am pleased and encouraged to see that for the seventh year in a row, California public school students continue to improve,” remarked O’Connell in an interview regarding the latest release of scores.

    In 2003, state proficiency scores in the Language Arts and Mathematics peaked at a lowly 35%. Given this clear problem, the state decided to change its standardized testing apparatus, aligning it to meet specific state academic standards. Since then, the number has been on a steady incline—and we can only hope for the continuation of this trend. 2009 marked the first year where over 50% of students were proficient in the Language Arts, up from 46% in 2008.
    “When I first saw that our proficiency was only at 50%, I thought we were doing badly,” remarked senior Austin Ho, “but when I found out that we were actually improving, I was proud.”

    On the contextual level of Arcadia High School, we aren’t doing too badly either. Since 2007, our school’s API, or Academic Performance Index, has stayed at 859—a rank of 10 statewide and 6 in the similar schools category. And the STAR testing results in 2009 have established Arcadia High School to be one of the highest-scoring schools in the San Gabriel Valley, with average scores in the Language Arts and Mathematics at around 400. In other words, the statewide API performance target is a number which we’ve long since conquered as a school.

    –This is where I’ll insert details of my interview with Dr. Shawn, to be conducted ASAP-

    But as junior Justine Lee put it best: “Our API may be good now, but it’s not rising. 400 is proficient, but we have to remember that it’s out of 600 total points.” And the problem may be in a factor not yet investigated. “It seems like many people just don’t care about the STAR test,” laughed senior Andrew Taylor, “and I know for a fact that I didn’t do as well as I could have simply because I thought it didn’t really matter.” The lack of incentive for students to do well on STAR testing may very well be the reason for our school’s objectively lackluster performance as a whole; as the only test not affecting one’s individual success as a college applicant, the STAR test ends up commonly taking a backseat to higher priorities in students’ lives.

    In the end, the answer to another step in vast improvement can be speculated to lie in simply taking the test seriously. But, even at its current rate, our school’s test score improvements leave little room for complaint. We can only hope that Arcadia’s STARs will continue to shine.

    NOTE: API reports in 2009 have not yet been released, so we’re stuck with STAR data.

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: California STAR Testing

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Mon Sep 14, 2009 11:40 pm

    didn't see anything to edit but be sure to get that interview in soon! I will be editing that part also when inserted.

    andrewchang

    Posts : 38
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: California STAR Testing

    Post  andrewchang on Tue Sep 15, 2009 11:19 pm

    California’s standardized test results have never been stunningly impressive—but they’re getting better. In the context of improvement, whether schoolwide or statewide, we’ve always reached our goals. And our Arcadia High School is no exception to this standard of achievement; if anything, we’re above and beyond it.

    The 2009 STAR testing results, released as a whole on August 20 by State Superintendent Jack O’Connell, indicated a continuation of the upward trend which California test scores have seen in the last seven years. “I am pleased and encouraged to see that for the seventh year in a row, California public school students continue to improve,” remarked O’Connell in an interview regarding the latest release of scores. In 2003, state proficiency scores in the language arts and mathematics peaked at a lowly 35%. Given this clear problem, the state decided to change its standardized testing apparatus, aligning it to meet specific state academic standards. Since then, the number has been on a steady incline—and we can only hope for the continuation of this trend.

    On the contextual level of Arcadia High School, we aren’t doing too badly either. Since 2007, our school’s API, or Academic Performance Index, has risen from 859 to 876—a 17-point improvement propelling the high school to a rank of 43rd out of 987 schools in the state. And the STAR testing results in 2009 have established Arcadia High School to be one of the highest-scoring schools in the San Gabriel Valley. In other words, the statewide API performance target is a number which we’ve long since conquered as a school.

    But as junior Justine Lee put it best: “Our API may be good now, but it’s not rising. A score of 400 is proficient, but we have to remember that it’s out of 600 total points.” The relatively slow speed with which our scores are rising, indeed, draws a slew of legitimate questioning. “It seems like many people just don’t care about the STAR test,” explained senior Andrew Taylor, delineating a possible reason as to why our scores are still objectively mediocre. And the lack of incentive for students to do well on STAR testing may very well be the reason for our school’s objectively lackluster performance as a whole; as the only test not affecting one’s individual success as a college applicant, the STAR test ends up commonly taking a backseat to higher priorities in students’ lives.

    But District Superintendent Dr. Joel Shawn thinks differently. “California schools have a belief that everyone is entitled to a public education,” he said, “and to apply the same academic standard to such a wide group of people is an incredibly challenging job.” And Shawn, too, has his point—that growth in and of itself is a remarkable thing because of the wide variety of factors which Arcadia High School must take into account. In our school alone, we take care of ten different subgroups of students, each with their own strengths and weaknesses and each requiring a vast amount of attention. Given this fact, it is imperative to realize that growth, perhaps, cannot possibly occur rapidly because of the very academic nature of California schools in general.

    In the end, the answer to another step in vast improvement cannot be said for certain. But even at its current rate, our school’s test score improvements leave little room for complaint. “It’s truly hard to believe how good our school is,” remarked Dr. Shawn—and it’s true. We can only hope that Arcadia’s STARs will continue to shine.

    lenakalemkiarian

    Posts : 166
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: California STAR Testing

    Post  lenakalemkiarian on Wed Sep 16, 2009 6:02 pm

    California’s standardized test [capitalize: Standardized Test] results have never been stunningly impressive—but they’re getting better. In the context of improvement, whether schoolwide or statewide, we’ve always reached our goals. And our Arcadia High School is no exception to this standard of achievement; if anything, we’re above and beyond it.

    The 2009 STAR testing results, released as a whole on August 20 by State Superintendent Jack O’Connell, indicated a continuation of the upward trend which California test scores have seen in the last seven years. “I am pleased and encouraged to see that for the seventh year in a row, California public school students continue to improve,” remarked O’Connell in an interview regarding the latest release of scores. In 2003, state proficiency scores in the language arts and mathematics peaked at a lowly 35%. Given this clear problem, the state decided to change its standardized testing apparatus, aligning it to meet specific state academic standards. Since then, the number has been on a steady incline—and we can only hope for the continuation of this trend.

    On the contextual level of Arcadia High School, we aren’t doing too badly either. Since 2007, our school’s API, or Academic Performance Index, has risen from 859 to 876—a 17-point improvement propelling the high school to a rank of 43rd out of 987 schools in the state. And the STAR testing results in 2009 have established Arcadia High School to be one of the highest-scoring schools in the San Gabriel Valley. In other words, the statewide API performance target is a number which we’ve long since conquered as a school.

    But as junior Justine Lee put it best: “Our API may be good now, but it’s not rising. A score of 400 is proficient, but we have to remember that it’s out of 600 total points.” The relatively slow speed with which our scores are rising, indeed, draws a slew of legitimate questioning. “It seems like many people just don’t care about the STAR test,” explained senior Andrew Taylor, delineating a possible reason as to why our scores are still objectively mediocre. And the lack of incentive for students to do well on STAR testing may very well be the reason for our school’s objectively lackluster performance as a whole; as the only test not affecting one’s individual success as a college applicant, the STAR test ends up commonly taking a backseat to higher priorities in students’ lives.

    But District Superintendent Dr. Joel Shawn thinks differently. “California schools have a belief that everyone is entitled to a public education,” he said, “and to apply the same academic standard to such a wide group of people is an incredibly challenging job.” And Shawn, too, has his point—that growth in and of itself is a remarkable thing because of the wide variety of factors which Arcadia High School must take into account. In our school alone, we take care of ten different subgroups of students, each with their own strengths and weaknesses and each requiring a vast amount of attention. Given this fact, it is imperative to realize that growth, perhaps, cannot possibly occur rapidly because of the very academic nature of California schools in general.

    In the end, the answer to another step in vast improvement cannot be said for certain. But even at its current rate, our school’s test score improvements leave little room for complaint. “It’s truly hard to believe how good our school is,” remarked Dr. Shawn—and it’s true. We can only hope that Arcadia’s STARs will continue to shine.

    Joanna Shen

    Posts : 87
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: California STAR Testing

    Post  Joanna Shen on Wed Sep 23, 2009 5:30 pm

    California’s standardized test results have never been stunningly impressive—but they’re getting better. In the context of improvement, whether schoolwide or statewide, we’ve always reached our goals. And our AHS is no exception to this standard of achievement; if anything, we’re above and beyond it.
    The 2009 STAR testing results, released as a whole on Aug. 20, indicated a continuation of the upward trend which California test scores have seen in the last seven years. “I am pleased and encouraged to see that for the seventh year in a row, California public school students continue to improve,” remarked State Superintendent Jack O’Connell. In 2003, state proficiency scores in the language arts and mathematics peaked at a lowly 35%. Given this clear problem, the state decided to change its standardized testing apparatus, aligning it to meet specific state academic standards. Since then, the number has been on a steady incline—and we can only hope for the continuation of this trend.
    On the contextual level of Arcadia High School, we aren’t doing too badly either. Since 2007, our school’s API, or Academic Performance Index, has risen from 859 to 876—a 17-point improvement propelling the high school to a rank of 43rd out of 987 schools in the state. And the STAR testing results in 2009 have established AHS to be one of the highest-scoring schools in the San Gabriel Valley. In other words, the statewide API performance target is a number which we’ve already reached.
    The relatively slow speed with which our scores are rising, indeed, draws a slew of legitimate questioning. “It seems like many people just don’t care about the STAR test,” explained senior Andrew Taylor, delineating a possible reason. And the lack of incentive for students to do well on STAR testing may very well be the reason for our school’s slow progress as a whole; as the only test not affecting one’s individual success as a college applicant, the STAR test ends up commonly taking a backseat to higher priorities in students’ lives.
    But District Superintendent Dr. Joel Shawn thinks differently. “California schools have a belief that everyone is entitled to a public education,” he said, “and to apply the same academic standard to such a wide group of people is an incredibly challenging job.” And Dr. Shawn, too, has his point—that growth in and of itself is a remarkable thing because of the wide variety of factors which AHS must take into account. In our school alone, we take care of ten different subgroups of students, each with their own strengths and weaknesses and each requiring a vast amount of attention. Given this fact, it is imperative to realize that growth, perhaps, cannot possibly occur rapidly because of the very academic nature of California schools in general.
    In the end, the answer to another step in vast improvement cannot be said for certain. But even at its current rate, our school’s test score improvements leave little room for complaint. “It’s truly hard to believe how good our school is,” remarked Dr. Shawn—and it’s true. We can only hope that Arcadia’s STARs will continue to shine.

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