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    W Virginia Mining Catastrophe

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    justinpark

    Posts : 55
    Join date : 2009-09-02
    Age : 22

    W Virginia Mining Catastrophe

    Post  justinpark on Sun Apr 18, 2010 5:11 pm

    By: Justin Park & Brandon Pang

    A tragic event occured on April 5 and was recorded as the most devastating mining accident since 1970. Families mourned over the loss of their children and churchgoers also honored the death of the 29 miners that were unfortunately caught in the accident. The explosion was an astounding 12,000 feet in length. Massey Energy Co., the corporation who owned the coal mine, is still working to get out miners; the list of the deaths are not yet official as sadly, more deceased miners are still being discovered in the ruins of the mine.

    West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin said, “None of our miners suffered, this journey has ended and now the healing will start.” In an optimistic point of view, "the only thing good that can come out of this is to educate everyone and put regulations in place if needed to make sure this doesn’t happen again” said Kevin Stricklin, Administrator of the Mine Safety and Health Administration.

    People don't know exactly how the explosion occurred. President Barack Obama has ordered federal investigators to conduct an inspection as to what might have caused it. Four years ago, a same kind of mine accident occurred, a very short time gap for cases like this. Authorities suggested that high levels of explosive methane gas could have played a role in the disaster. Massey has also been repeatedly cited and fined for malfunctions with the system that vents methane and for allowing combustible dust to accumulate.

    Churches have been busy with assuaging the deceased miners' families, constantly consoling them, and sympathizing with them. It seems occasions like these are not out of the ordinary since an mine disaster took place just four years previous. Catholic Bishop Michael J. Bransfield said, "Can those entrusted with the protection of miners be trusted to fulfill the jobs and enforce the laws? Is our technology in the U.S. mines in 2010 equal to the technology that is easily available in other industries? Is it safer to travel in space than to work in a West Virginia mine?"

    This tragedy has stirred up the whole region of West Virginia; a region where many people are in the mining occupation or know people who do. Apparently, the mining business has a stable profit income and earns most than other jobs in the area. Catastrophes like this have people all around America questioning, "Why do they do it? Why do they go into the mines and put their selves in danger?"

    What if the city of Arcadia, California was a major location for coal mining, or just mining in general. Tragedies where people perish from being stuck in mines slowly running out of oxygen while inhaling dangerous chemicals, or even being blasted by an explosion in places that are confined, just isn't normal. Nevertheless, if our economy is to continue, then mining must also continue. Hopefully Massey and the Mine Safety and Health Administration will provide safer facilities so calamities like this does not occur in a regular basis.

    Catastrophic Mining Calamity
    Explosion that Rocked W Virginia

    brandonpang

    Posts : 19
    Join date : 2010-01-29

    Re: W Virginia Mining Catastrophe

    Post  brandonpang on Mon Apr 19, 2010 3:55 am

    By: Justin Park & Brandon Pang

    A tragic event occurred on Apr. 5, which was recorded as the most devastating mining accident since 1970. Families mourned over the loss of their children and churchgoers honored the death of the 29 miners that were unfortunately caught in the accident. The explosion was an astounding 12,000 feet in length. Massey Energy Co., the corporation who owned the coal mine, is still working to get out miners; the list of the deaths are not yet official as sadly, more deceased miners are still being discovered in the ruins of the mine.

    West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin said, “None of our miners suffered, this journey has ended and now the healing will start.” In an optimistic point of view, "the only thing good that can come out of this is to educate everyone and put regulations in place if needed to make sure this doesn’t happen again” said Kevin Stricklin, Administrator of the Mine Safety and Health Administration.

    People do not know exactly how the explosion occurred. President Barack Obama has ordered federal investigators to conduct an inspection as to what might have caused it. Four years ago, a same kind of mine accident occurred, a very short time gap for cases like this. Authorities suggested that high levels of explosive methane gas could have played a role in the disaster. Massey has also been repeatedly cited and fined for malfunctions with the system, that vents methane and for allowing combustible dust to accumulate.

    Churches have been busy with assuaging the deceased miners' families, constantly consoling them, and sympathizing with them. It seems occasions like these are not out of the ordinary since a mine disaster took place just four years previous. Catholic Bishop Michael J. Bransfield said, "Can those entrusted with the protection of miners be trusted to fulfill the jobs and enforce the laws? Is our technology in the U.S. mines in 2010 equal to the technology that is easily available in other industries? Is it safer to travel in space than to work in a West Virginia mine?"

    This tragedy has stirred up the whole region of West Virginia; a region where many people are in the mining occupation or know people who do. Apparently, the mining business has a stable profit income and earns most than other jobs in the area. Catastrophes like this have people all around America questioning, "Why do they do it? Why do they go into the mines and put their selves in danger?"

    What if the city of Arcadia, California was a major location for coal mining, or just mining in general? Freshmen Allen Miao said, “I would be very concerned if Arcadia were a mining city for two reasons. One, the exhaust and chemicals given off by mining industries are very [pernicious] and could risk the well-being of thousands of citizens. Secondly, the dangers of the mining industry are far too extreme and tragic, and lives should not be risked for the selfish desires of mining companies.” Tragedies where people perish from being stuck in mines slowly running out of oxygen while inhaling dangerous chemicals, or even being blasted by an explosion in places that are confined, just isn't normal. Nevertheless, if our economy is to continue, then mining must also continue. Hopefully, Massey and the Mine Safety and Health Administration will provide safer facilities so calamities like this do not occur in a regular basis.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100411/ap_on_re_us/us_mine_explosion;_ylt=AkEFLWhhWhLb_stKy6mwBHWs0NUE;_ylu=X3oDMTFlM29xZmF2BHBvcwM2NgRzZWMDYWNjb3JkaW9uX3Vfc19uZXdzBHNsawNjaHVyY2hnb2Vyc2g-
    http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-04-10/west-virginia-mine-death-toll-at-29-worst-since-1970-update1-.html

    Catastrophic Mining Calamity
    Explosion that Rocked W Virginia

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