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    velindaliao

    Posts : 24
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    stanford

    Post  velindaliao on Tue Apr 20, 2010 11:38 am

    With sand under my feet, seawater around my legs, and gentle winds blowing, I took a stroll on the beach. As I walked further away from the beach house where I was staying, my friends’ laughter faded into the sound of crashing waves. The sun was setting, casting an orange glow over the landscape. I took a picture - a snapshot of the sun disappearing behind a calm horizon. I can hardly remember another time when I was this thoroughly happy. This is what the last eight months of my life has been like. This is Stanford.

    That weekend, my residential assistants (upperclassman who lead and supervise my all-freshman dorm) had rented two beach houses to accommodate all 40 people in my dorm to mark the beginning of Spring Quarter. The camera I used was a Canon EOS 5D, an almost professional SLR camera that a class equipped me with.

    This class is the Technical Aspects of Photography, taught by a physics Nobel Prize laureate, Dr. Douglas Osheroff, who happens to be an avid photographer. There are countless professors like Dr. Osheroff in Stanford – professors who want to share their passions – professors willing to spend thousands of dollars on camera equipment for you, drive you to various scenic locations on photo excursions to “gain field experience,” then treat you to lunch simply because you happen to share the same interests as them.

    Besides these interest-driven seminars, my regular classes are just as remarkable. To provide some perspective, my multivariable calculus class uses the same textbook as an equivalent class at MIT, but we went through the entire book much faster than the class at MIT did. Why? Because while most universities (including MIT) use a fifteen-week semester system, Stanford operates on a ten-week quarter system. The pace of classes is definitely faster at Stanford, but we also get to choose classes twelve times as an undergraduate, as opposed to only eight times in semester-system universities. Students here have more opportunities to explore their interests.

    The atmosphere at Stanford is rather laid back. The cutthroat competition and snobby elitism commonly associated with top institutions simply don’t exist here. After all, Stanford’s campus used to be a large farm, and I suspect the landscape’s idyllic and pastoral past infects the spirit of whoever sets foot upon our beautiful campus.

    My peers are the nicest, most caring, and most diverse group of people I have ever met; not to mention they are all extremely intelligent, talented, and passionate about what they do. From the Icelandic polyglot aspiring to be a neurosurgeon to the Massachusetts entrepreneur who already owns a multimillion dollar company; the Malaysian winner of the International Mathematics Olympiad to the Californian violin prodigy who worked at the White House, this is the essence of Stanford.


    Last edited by velindaliao on Fri Apr 23, 2010 11:41 am; edited 4 times in total

    velindaliao

    Posts : 24
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: stanford

    Post  velindaliao on Tue Apr 20, 2010 11:54 am

    With soft sand under my feet, cool seawater around my legs, and gentle winds blowing through my hair, I took a stroll on the beach. As I walked further away from the beach-house where I was staying, the sound of my friends’ laughter and conversation faded into the sound of crashing waves. The sun was setting, casting an orange glow over the beautiful landscape. With a camera in my hands, I took a picture - a snapshot of the sun disappearing behind a calm horizon. I can hardly remember another time when I was this thoroughly happy. This is what the last eight months of my life has been like. This is Stanford.

    Last weekend, my residential assistants (upperclassman trained to lead and supervise my all-freshman dorm) rented two houses on a beach nearby to accommodate all 40 people in my dorm. It was a dorm trip that marks the beginning of Spring Quarter. The camera I used was a Canon EOS 5D, an almost professional SLR camera that a class equipped me with.

    This class is the Technical Aspects of Photography, taught by a physics Nobel Prize laureate, Dr. Douglas Osheroff, who happens to be an avid photographer. There are countless professors like Dr. Osheroff in Stanford – professors who want to share their passions – professors willing to spend thousands of dollars on camera equipment for you, drive you to various scenic locations on photo excursions to “gain field experience,” then treat you to lunch simply because you happen to share the same interests as them.

    Besides these interest-driven seminars, my regular classes are just as remarkable. To provide some perspective, my multivariable calculus class uses the same textbook as an equivalent class at MIT, but we went through the entire book much faster than the class at MIT did. Why? Because while most universities (including MIT) use a fifteen-week semester system, Stanford operates on a ten-week quarter system. The pace of classes is definitely faster at Stanford, but we also get to choose classes twelve times as an undergraduate, as opposed to only eight times in semester-system universities. Students here have more opportunities to explore their interests.

    The atmosphere at Stanford is rather laid back. The cutthroat competition and snobby elitism commonly associated with top institutions simply don’t exist here. After all, Stanford’s campus used to be a large farm, and I suspect the landscape’s idyllic and pastoral past infects the spirit of whoever sets foot upon our beautiful campus.

    My peers are the nicest, most caring, and most diverse group of people I have ever met; not to mention they are all extremely intelligent, talented, and passionate about what they do. From the Icelandic polyglot aspiring to be a neurosurgeon to the Massachusetts entrepreneur who already owns a multimillion dollar company; the Malaysian winner of the International Mathematics Olympiad to the Californian violin prodigy who worked at the White House, this is the essence of Stanford.

    velindaliao

    Posts : 24
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: stanford

    Post  velindaliao on Thu Apr 22, 2010 11:59 am

    With sand under my feet, seawater around my legs, and gentle winds blowing, I took a stroll on the beach. As I walked further away from the beach house where I was staying, my friends’ laughter faded into the sound of crashing waves. The sun was setting, casting an orange glow over the landscape. I took a picture of the sun disappearing behind a calm horizon. I can hardly remember another time when I was this thoroughly happy. This is what the last eight months of my life has been like. This is Stanford.

    That weekend, my residential assistants rented two beach houses to accommodate all 40 people in my dorm to mark the beginning of Spring Quarter. The camera I used was a Canon EOS 5D, an almost professional SLR camera that a class equipped me with.

    This class is the Technical Aspects of Photography, taught by a physics Nobel Prize laureate, Dr. Douglas Osheroff, who happens to be an avid photographer. There are countless professors like Dr. Osheroff in Stanford – professors who want to share their passions – professors willing to spend thousands of dollars on camera equipment for you, drive you to various scenic locations on photo excursions to “gain field experience,” then treat you to lunch simply because you share the same interests as them.

    [CUT ONE MORE WORD FROM THIS PARAGRAPH]
    Besides these interest-driven seminars, my regular classes are just as remarkable. My multivariable calculus class uses the same textbook as an equivalent class at MIT, but we went through the entire book much faster than the class at MIT did. Why? Because while most universities (including MIT) use a fifteen-week semester system, Stanford operates on a ten-week quarter system. Though the pace of classes is definitely faster at Stanford, we get to choose classes twelve times as undergraduates, as opposed to only eight times in semester-system universities.

    The atmosphere at Stanford is rather laid back. The cutthroat competition and snobby elitism commonly associated with top institutions simply don’t exist here. After all, Stanford’s campus used to be a large farm, and I suspect its idyllic and pastoral past infects the spirit of whoever sets foot upon our beautiful campus.

    My peers are the nicest, most caring, and most diverse group of people I have ever met; not to mention they are all extremely intelligent, talented, and passionate about what they do. From the Icelandic polyglot aspiring to be a neurosurgeon to the Massachusetts entrepreneur who already owns a multimillion dollar company; the Malaysian winner of the International Mathematics Olympiad to the Californian violin prodigy who worked at the White House, this is the essence of Stanford.

    velindaliao

    Posts : 24
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: stanford

    Post  velindaliao on Fri Apr 23, 2010 11:59 am

    ADD ONE SENTENCES/A LITTLE BIT TO DEREK'S PROFILE

    velindaliao

    Posts : 24
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: stanford

    Post  velindaliao on Sat Apr 24, 2010 9:26 pm

    With sand under my feet, seawater around my legs, and gentle winds blowing, I took a stroll on the beach. As I walked further away from the beach house where I was staying, my friends’ laughter faded into the sound of crashing waves. The sun was setting, casting an orange glow over the landscape. I took a picture of the sun disappearing behind a calm horizon. I can hardly remember another time when I was this thoroughly happy. This is what the last eight months of my life has been like. This is Stanford.

    That weekend, my residential assistants rented two beach houses to accommodate all 40 people in my dorm to mark the beginning of Spring Quarter. The camera I used was a Canon EOS 5D, an almost professional SLR camera that a class equipped me with.

    This class is the Technical Aspects of Photography, taught by a physics Nobel Prize laureate, Dr. Douglas Osheroff, who happens to be an avid photographer. There are countless professors like Dr. Osheroff in Stanford – professors who want to share their passions – professors willing to spend thousands of dollars on camera equipment for you, drive you to various scenic locations on photo excursions to “gain field experience,” then treat you to lunch simply because you share the same interests as them.

    Besides these interest-driven seminars, regular classes are just as remarkable. My multivariable calculus class uses the same textbook as an equivalent class at MIT, but we went through the entire book much faster than the class at MIT did. Why? Because while most universities (like MIT) use a fifteen-week semester system, Stanford operates on a ten-week quarter system. Though the pace of classes is definitely faster at Stanford, we get to choose classes 12 times as undergraduates, as opposed to only eight times in semester-system universities.

    The atmosphere at Stanford is rather laid back. The cutthroat competition and snobby elitism commonly associated with top institutions simply don’t exist here. After all, Stanford’s campus used to be a large farm, and I suspect its idyllic and pastoral past infects the spirit of whoever sets foot upon our beautiful campus.

    My peers are the nicest, most caring, and most diverse group of people I have ever met; not to mention they are all extremely intelligent, talented, and passionate about what they do. From the Icelandic polyglot aspiring to be a neurosurgeon to the Massachusetts entrepreneur who already owns a multimillion dollar company; the Malaysian winner of the International Mathematics Olympiad to the Californian violin prodigy who worked at the White House, this is the essence of Stanford.

    2ND REVISION - HOPE IT FITS :D


    Last edited by velindaliao on Sun Apr 25, 2010 4:12 pm; edited 1 time in total

    katetrinh

    Posts : 31
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: stanford

    Post  katetrinh on Sun Apr 25, 2010 1:29 pm

    DEREK's PROFILE:

    Stanford University is at a perfect geographic location for three reasons. First is the distance from home; while it is not as far as colleges in the east coast, it is not as close as UCs and private universities in Southern California. This means you are close enough to comfortably return home for the holidays, but far enough that your parents can’t easily surprise you in your dorm. Second is the beautiful California sunshine, but you already understand the benefits of that. Third is Stanford’s proximity to two amazing locations: San Francisco and San Jose, home of the Silicon Valley.
    If you are interested in engineering, computer science, or entrepreneurship, Stanford is an especially suitable choice because you will be at the heart of today’s biggest innovations. The founders of Google, Yahoo, and other successful companies went to Stanford, and you will find many buildings named after famous leaders including Bill Gates, Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard, and Jerry Yang. I have already attended many job fairs with employees like Facebook and Apple who have high expectations from Stanford students. My roommate, a computer science major, is taking an iPhone app class, meets weekly with CEO’s about internship offers, and enjoys a great community of exceptional minds. In my own field of engineering, you can participate in amazing projects like the DARPA Urban Challenge, solar car races, and revolutionary energy research. Of course, the other sciences and humanities at Stanford are also great, but you will find no other college with engineering and entrepreneurship opportunities like Stanford.
    Another quality that sets Stanford apart from other universities is its one-of-a-kind student atmosphere. Stanford prides itself on providing an extreme social life with an unusual student body. Our mascot is literally an ugly tree that dances around and makes fun of other college mascots. One of the most ridiculous traditions at Stanford is fountain hopping, which involves gathering a group of your crazy friends at midnight and jumping into the many ice-cold fountains on campus. If you are slightly more restrained, there is an amazing hiking destination in the foothills below Stanford, a vibrant ballroom dance community, or plenty of places to just relax in arguably the most beautiful campus in the nation. Every week you can find amazing shows, parties, speakers, and other events that only happen at Stanford. Because it is so isolated from other top private universities, Stanford truly presents a unique, untraditional college life that rewards hard work with lots of fun.

    velindaliao

    Posts : 24
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: stanford

    Post  velindaliao on Sun Apr 25, 2010 4:21 pm

    DEREK'S

    Stanford University is at a perfect geographic location for three reasons. First is the distance away from home; while it is not as far away as colleges in the east coast, it is not as close to home as UCs and private universities located in Southern California. This means you are close enough to comfortably return home for the holidays, but far away enough so that your parents cannot easily surprise you in your dorm. Second is the beautiful California sunshine, but I assume you already understand the benefits of that. Third is Stanford’s proximity to two amazing locations: San Francisco and San Jose, home of the Silicon Valley.

    If you are interested in engineering, computer science, or entrepreneurship, Stanford is an especially suitable choice because you will be at the heart of today’s biggest innovations. The founders of Google, Yahoo, and other successful companies went to Stanford, and you will find many buildings named after famous leaders including Bill Gates, Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard, and Jerry Yang. I have already attended many job fairs with employers from Facebook and Apple who have high expectations from Stanford students. My roommate, a computer science major, is taking an iPhone app class, meets weekly with CEO’s about internship offers, and enjoys a great community of exceptional minds. In my own field of engineering, Civil Engineering and Architecture, you can participate in amazing projects like the DARPA Urban Challenge, solar car races, and revolutionary energy research. Of course, the other sciences and humanities at Stanford are also great, but you will find no other college with engineering and entrepreneurship opportunities like Stanford.

    Another quality that sets Stanford apart from other universities is its one-of-a-kind student atmosphere. Stanford prides itself on providing an extreme social life with an unusual student body. Our mascot is literally an ugly tree that dances around and makes fun of other college mascots. One of the most ridiculous traditions at Stanford is fountain hopping, which involves gathering a group of your crazy friends at midnight and jumping into the many ice-cold fountains on campus. If you are slightly more restrained, there is an amazing hiking destination in the foothills below Stanford, a vibrant ballroom dance community, or plenty of places to just relax in arguably the most beautiful campus in the nation. Every week you can find amazing shows, parties, speakers, and other events that only happen at Stanford. Because it is so isolated from other top private universities, Stanford truly presents a unique, untraditional college life that rewards hard work with lots of fun.

    EDITED: so i just added some stuff to the first paragraph and then i changed the employees to employers and i also included his major into the 2nd paragraph :D tell me if it still doesnt fitttt

    also i just edited my last post on paul's article (its the last post with paul's profile. and i changed the 10 back to ten and stuff) so thats done as well :3

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