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    Day of Silence

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    estherlin

    Posts : 16
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Day of Silence

    Post  estherlin on Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:32 pm

    Apr. 16 on the AHS campus constituted a special day as various students of Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) participate in the Day of Silence (DOS), a nationwide event meant to focus awareness on the mistreatment of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transsexual (LGBT) individuals or those who are perceived as such. For years, mistreated individuals have been driven to extremities such as suicide and running away as a result of the harassment they have to face for being who they are. On a day to day basis, words like “gay” spill out of students’ mouths. Students use these words with negative connotation and without any consideration for people who are of the orientation. Because of this kind of action, LGBT have been intimidated into passivity when they should not have to live in fear. The key is awareness. As advisor Ms. Madeline Antilla states, “We want people to stop and think.”

    Stemming from student-lead action on the campus of the University of Virginia (UVA) in 1996, the DOS has transformed into a tradition. In April of 2002, students organized the DOS in more than 1,900 schools across the country, with approximately 100,000 students who joined in the effort. Entering AHS about 8 years ago, the occasion is still going strong in AHS. It remains a efficient and nonviolent method of attracting attention to an important and widespread issue that transcends the boundaries of AHS. Even though only 20-40 students participate and these partakers from the GSA are small in numbers, their influence is significant and they continue to aim for greater equality for LGBT who have been unfairly discriminated against. Through this single event, individuals of LGBT orientation are encouraged to stand proud for themselves because because what they as themselves should not be impeded by external influences.

    Participants of the activity attained permission from their teachers beforehand. Since it would ultimately be distracting to the learning atmosphere to have students resist speech during class, participants of the DOS are encouraged to participate in class in whatever way necessary. Writing is also permitted. However, students carry around a card during the rest of the day that they present to other people when they are being spoken to. The card explains the purpose of the DOS movement and provokes other people into thinking about the issue. Sophomore Jessica Pineda is proud of the results because “we didn’t expect a lot of people to participate, but when I looked around the school, I saw quite a few people with tape on their mouths.” In addition, she was also glad that “compared to last year, the people who weren’t participating didn’t tease the participants.” When it comes down to it, Apr. 16 was really a day for many to take a stand for their beliefs.

    What will you do to end the Silence?


    Like I said, I haven't gotten any more email responses from people, but I'll make sure to insert them if I do.

    velindaliao

    Posts : 24
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Day of Silence

    Post  velindaliao on Thu Apr 22, 2010 11:56 am

    hi esther!

    please reword this sentence :D

    On a day to day basis, words like “gay” spill out of students’ mouths.

    AND HEY YOU DIDNT PROOFREAD :C EVERYTHING WAS IN PRESENT TENSE WOMAN

    estherlin

    Posts : 16
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Day of Silence

    Post  estherlin on Fri Apr 23, 2010 10:22 am

    SORRY VELINDAA! OKAY, I FIXED IT!



    Apr. 16 on the AHS campus constituted a special day as various students of Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) participate in the Day of Silence (DOS), a nationwide event meant to focus awareness on the mistreatment of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transsexual (LGBT) individuals or those who are perceived as such. For years, mistreated individuals have been driven to extremities such as suicide and running away as a result of the harassment they have to face for being who they are. On a day to day basis, students abuse words like "gay," without any consideration for people who are of the orientation. Students use these words with negative connotation and in a hurtful manner. Because of this kind of action, LGBT have been intimidated into passivity when they should not have to live in fear. The key is awareness. As advisor Ms. Madeline Antilla states, “we want people to stop and think.”

    Stemming from student-lead action on the campus of the University of Virginia (UVA) in 1996, the DOS has transformed into a tradition. In April of 2002, students organized the DOS in more than 1,900 schools across the country, with approximately 100,000 students who joined in the effort. Entering AHS about 8 years ago, the occasion is still going strong in AHS. It remains a efficient and nonviolent method of attracting attention to an important and widespread issue that transcends the boundaries of AHS. Even though only 20-40 students participate and these partakers from the GSA are small in numbers, their influence was significant and they continue to aim for greater equality for LGBT who have been unfairly discriminated against. Through this single event, individuals of LGBT orientation were encouraged to stand proud for themselves because what they are themselves should never be impeded by external influences.

    Participants of the activity attained permission from their teachers beforehand. Since it would ultimately be distracting to the learning atmosphere to have students resist speech during class, participants of the DOS were encouraged to participate in class in whatever way necessary. Writing was also permitted. However, students carried around a card during the rest of the day that they presented to other people when they were being spoken to. The card explained the purpose of the DOS movement and provoked other people into thinking about the issue. Sophomore Jessica Pineda was proud of the results because “we didn’t expect a lot of people to participate, but when I looked around the school, I saw quite a few people with tape on their mouths.” In addition, she was also glad that “compared to last year, the people who weren’t participating didn’t tease the participants.” When it comes down to it, Apr. 16 was really a day for many to take a stand for their beliefs.

    Now a question for you: What will you do to end the Silence?

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