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    jasminewu

    Posts : 56
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Santa Clara Law

    Post  jasminewu on Mon May 10, 2010 8:12 am

    Jasmine Wu
    Santa Clara Law

    Remember back in the day, when you would go to the nearby McDonalds and look forward to, along with eating your Happy Meal, receiving that coveted limited-ruby-edition Smiley Charm Plush Bear? Or, remember sitting in a Burger King booth and fighting your brother’s Super Ninja toy with your own Power Ninja toy (adding ketchup for dramatic effect, of course), while dunking your chicken nuggets in barbecue sauce and having an all-around good time? Children in Santa Clara were familiar with such feelings, but that was before a county law was passed, banning restaurants from giving away toys with certain children’s meals labeled as unhealthy.

    This new ordinance, though supported by people all over the country, has been laid under heavy fire by Santa Clara parents accusing the government of interfering with their rights and abilities to make decisions for their own children. Some parents say that the toys included in fast food children’s meals are just added bonuses to make their children more satisfied with their meals, while other parents are just outraged at the government’s involvement in their children’s mealtimes. In general, the parents against the new law believe it to be, on the government’s part, unnecessary and intrusive.

    On the other hand, the parents for the new ordinance support their view by pointing out that nearly one in four children in Santa Clara County is either overweight or obese, and they believe that this new law is a step in a positive direction. “This ordinance breaks the link between unhealthy food and prizes,” said Ken Yeager, the law’s author. “Obviously, toys in and of themselves do not make children obese. But it is unfair to parents and children to use toys to capture the tastes of children when they are young and get them hooked on eating high-sugar, high-fat foods early in life.”

    While this is thought to be the first law of its type, Yeager hopes that this new law will affect other cities around the country so they will act in a fashion similar to “ripples that create a wave,” this wave being a reform in the attitude towards fast food.

    (will add quotes asap)

    jasminewu

    Posts : 56
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Santa Clara Law

    Post  jasminewu on Wed May 12, 2010 10:34 am

    Jasmine Wu
    Santa Clara Law

    Remember back in the day, when you would go to the nearby McDonald's and look forward to, along with eating your Happy Meal, receiving that coveted limited-ruby-edition Smiley Charm Plush Bear? Or, remember sitting in a Burger King booth and fighting your brother’s Super Ninja toy with your own Power Ninja toy (adding ketchup for dramatic effect, of course), while dunking your chicken nuggets in barbecue sauce and having an all-around good time? Children in Santa Clara were familiar with such feelings, but that was before a county law, banning restaurants from giving away toys with certain children’s meals labeled as unhealthy, was passed.

    This new ordinance, though supported by people all over the country, has been laid under heavy fire by Santa Clara parents accusing the government of interfering with their rights and abilities to make decisions for their own children. Some parents say that the toys included in fast food children’s meals are just added bonuses to make their children more satisfied with their meals, while other parents are just outraged at the government’s involvement in their children’s mealtimes. In general, the parents against the new law believe it to be, on the government’s part, unnecessary and intrusive.

    On the other hand, the parents for the new ordinance support their view by pointing out that nearly one in four children in Santa Clara County is either overweight or obese. They believe that this new law is a step in a positive direction and hope that, as a result of the new law, obesity rates will decrease within the county. “This ordinance breaks the link between unhealthy food and prizes,” said Ken Yeager, the law’s author. “Obviously, toys in and of themselves do not make children obese. But it is unfair to parents and children to use toys to capture the tastes of children when they are young and get them hooked on eating high-sugar, high-fat foods early in life.”

    While this is thought to be the first law of its type, Yeager hopes that this new law will affect other cities around the country so they will act in a fashion similar to “ripples that create a wave,” this wave being a reform in the attitude towards fast food.

    nancyxiao

    Posts : 170
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Santa Clara Law

    Post  nancyxiao on Sun May 16, 2010 1:25 am

    Jasmine Wu
    Santa Clara Law

    Remember back in the day, when you would go to the nearby McDonald's and look forward to, along with eating your Happy Meal, receiving that coveted limited-ruby-edition Smiley Charm Plush Bear? Or, remember sitting in a Burger King booth and fighting your brother’s Super Ninja toy with your own Power Ninja toy (adding ketchup for dramatic effect, of course), while dunking your chicken nuggets in barbecue sauce and having an all-around good time? Children in Santa Clara were familiar with such feelings, but that was before a county law, banning restaurants from giving away toys with certain children’s meals labeled as unhealthy, was passed.

    This new ordinance, though supported by people all over the country, has been laid under heavy fire by Santa Clara parents accusing the government of interfering with their rights and abilities to make decisions for their own children. Some parents say that the toys included in fast food children’s meals are just added bonuses to make their children more satisfied with their meals, while other parents are just outraged at the government’s involvement in their children’s mealtimes. In general, the parents against the new law believe it to be, on the government’s part, unnecessary and intrusive.

    On the other hand, the parents for the new ordinance support their view by pointing out that nearly one in four children in Santa Clara County is either overweight or obese. They believe that this new law is a step in a positive direction and hope that, as a result of the new law, obesity rates will decrease within the county. “This ordinance breaks the link between unhealthy food and prizes,” said Ken Yeager, the law’s author. “Obviously, toys in and of themselves do not make children obese. But it is unfair to parents and children to use toys to capture the tastes of children when they are young and get them hooked on eating high-sugar, high-fat foods early in life.”

    While this is thought to be the first law of its type, Yeager hopes that this new law will affect other cities around the country so they will act in a fashion similar to “ripples that create a wave,” this wave being a reform in the attitude towards fast food.

    jasminewu

    Posts : 56
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Santa Clara Law

    Post  jasminewu on Mon May 17, 2010 9:37 am

    Jasmine Wu
    Santa Clara Law

    Remember back in the day, when you would go to the nearby McDonald’s and look forward to, along with eating your Happy Meal, receiving that coveted limited-ruby-edition Smiley Charm Plush Bear? Or, remember sitting in a Burger King booth and fighting your brother’s Super Ninja toy with your own Power Ninja toy (adding ketchup for dramatic effect, of course), while dunking your chicken nuggets in barbecue sauce and having an all-around good time? Children in Santa Clara were familiar with such feelings, but that was before a county law was passed, banning restaurants from giving away toys with certain children’s meals labeled as unhealthy.

    This new ordinance, though supported by people all over the country, has been laid under heavy fire by Santa Clara parents accusing the government of interfering with their rights and abilities to make decisions for their own children. Some parents say that the toys included in fast food children’s meals are just added bonuses to make their children more satisfied with their meals, while other parents are just outraged at the government’s involvement in their children’s mealtimes. In general, the parents against the new law believe it to be, on the government’s part, unnecessary and intrusive. Sophomore James Star agreed with those calling this an example of a “nanny government” and said, “Most fast food places have a healthy alternative in their children's menus, so if parents didn’t want to give their children unhealthy food with a toy in the first place, they could order the apple slices or something else.” Senior Carrie Chow said, “I don't think it’ll stop anything; fries are good with or without a toy.”

    On the other hand, the parents for the new ordinance support their view by pointing out that nearly one in four children in Santa Clara County is either overweight or obese, and they believe that this new law is a step in a positive direction. “This ordinance breaks the link between unhealthy food and prizes,” said Ken Yeager, the law’s author. “Obviously, toys in and of themselves do not make children obese. But it is unfair to parents and children to use toys to capture the tastes of children when they are young and get them hooked on eating high-sugar, high-fat foods early in life.” Sophomore Andersen Shen said, “[The law] is not saying that you can’t order the unhealthy foods; it’s just turning away the appeal of them (similar to anti-smoking movements of the late 1900’s.”

    While this is thought to be the first law of its type, Yeager hopes that this new law will affect other cities around the country so they will act in a fashion similar to “ripples that create a wave,” this wave being a reform in the attitude towards fast food.

    (460 words)

    jasminewu

    Posts : 56
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Santa Clara Law

    Post  jasminewu on Mon May 17, 2010 9:44 am

    Jasmine Wu
    Santa Clara Law

    Remember back in the day, when you would go to the nearby McDonald’s and look forward to, along with eating your Happy Meal, receiving that coveted limited-ruby-edition Smiley Charm Plush Bear? Or, remember sitting in a Burger King booth and fighting your brother’s Super Ninja toy with your own Power Ninja toy (adding ketchup for dramatic effect, of course), while dunking your chicken nuggets in barbecue sauce and having an all-around good time? Children in Santa Clara were familiar with such feelings, but that was before a county law was passed, banning restaurants from giving away toys with certain children’s meals labeled as unhealthy.

    This new ordinance, though supported by people all over the country, has been laid under heavy fire by Santa Clara parents accusing the government of interfering with their rights and abilities to make decisions for their own children. Some parents say that the toys included in fast food children’s meals are just added bonuses to make their children more satisfied with their meals, while other parents are just outraged at the government’s involvement in their children’s mealtimes. In general, the parents against the new law believe it to be, on the government’s part, unnecessary and intrusive. Sophomore James Star agreed with those calling this an example of a “nanny government” and said, “Most fast food places have a healthy alternative in their children's menus, so if parents didn’t want to give their children unhealthy food with a toy in the first place, they could order the apple slices or something else.” Senior Carrie Chow said, “I don't think it’ll stop anything; fries are good with or without a toy.”

    On the other hand, the parents for the new ordinance support their view by pointing out that nearly one in four children in Santa Clara County is either overweight or obese, and they believe that this new law is a step in a positive direction. “This ordinance breaks the link between unhealthy food and prizes,” said Ken Yeager, the law’s author. “Obviously, toys in and of themselves do not make children obese. But it is unfair to parents and children to use toys to capture the tastes of children when they are young and get them hooked on eating high-sugar, high-fat foods early in life.” Sophomore Andersen Shen said, “[The law] is not saying that you can’t order the unhealthy foods; it’s just turning away the appeal of them (similar to anti-smoking movements of the late 1900’s).”

    While this is thought to be the first law of its type, Yeager hopes that this new law will affect other cities around the country so they will act in a fashion similar to “ripples that create a wave,” this wave being a reform in the attitude towards fast food.

    (460 words)

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