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    Samart Choices

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    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Samart Choices

    Post  raphaellu on Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:17 am

    Raphael Lu

    Smart Choices (no quotes yet)
    As many people know, America is experiencing an epidemic of obesity. Numerous organizations have produced a health stamp that claims its food to be healthy such as the well-known “Smart-spot®️” found on every bag of Baked Cheetos®️ or the “Sensible Choices®️” logo found on every box of those 100 Calorie Snacks®️. In this frenzy of “healthy foods” a new organization has emerged, replacing the old organizations by uniting the major food companies. These organizations were originally started to aide shoppers in making healthful food choices and hopefully resolve America’s obesity.
    However, many critics claim the standards to receive the stamp are way too lenient. The most debated section of the new organization is the category of breakfast items. The requirement for cereal is the maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving. 12 grams of sugar is approximately 3 teaspoons of sugar and when combined with the other sugary items one has for breakfast, you might as well have eaten a candy bar instead.
    For example a serving size of Lucky Charms®️ (1 cup) and a cup of Blueberry Yoplait Yogurt®️ are already 39 grams of sugar. The recommended daily amount of sugar is around 40 grams. This is a problem because it is impossible to not eat sugar for the rest of the day.
    Because of this, the organization has been accused if being a marketing tool. Why else would a company sell obviously unhealthy foods as “healthy”? The only other reasonable explanation of this is to sell the food to the less aware public or to people who are desperate to lose weight.
    The effect of this lure of “healthy foods” is the buying of more of these products. This instead of helping the consumers actually harms them. When they eat the foods they in turn will become more obese. After getting fatter, they will think that they need to eat more “healthy” foods. This throws the consumers on a viscous cycle and making their lives worse.
    Some people might debate and say that the company also certifies healthier foods such free range turkey and fresh vegetables. However, in our fast passed society, people rarely have time for a fresh home cooked meal; instead they just nuke a tv dinner or go out for a quick bite just for the convenience.
    Just because a product has the “Healthy Choices®️” or any other logo, doesn’t ensure that the food is healthy. However, it can still be put into consideration while shopping. If the consumer uses their brain he or she can eliminate the obviously unhealthy food like Froot Loops®️ and be steered to the path of truly healthful choices. More over, even if a food is healthy it doesn’t mean they should eat a lot. If everyone where to be mindful of what they buy and how much they consume, they can eliminate the need for these organizations, that are vulnerable to corrupt, and truly begin the lose weight.

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    smart choices

    Post  raphaellu on Wed Oct 07, 2009 11:43 am

    Raphael Lu

    Smart Choices (no quotes yet) (looking for quotes right now)
    As many people know, America is experiencing an epidemic of obesity. Numerous organizations have produced a health stamp that claims its food to be healthy such as the well-known Smart-spot found on every bag of Baked Cheetos or the “Sensible Choices” logo found on every box of those 100 Calorie Snacks. In this frenzy of healthy foods a new organization has emerged, replacing the old organizations by uniting the major food companies. These organizations were originally started to aide shoppers in making healthful food choices and hopefully resolve America’s obesity.
    However, many critics claim the standards to receive the stamp are way too lenient therefore allowing virtually any product to claim that it healthy. This in turn tricks the consumer into buying the products. The most debated section of the new organization is the category of breakfast items. The requirement for cereal is the maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving. 12 grams of sugar is approximately 3 teaspoons of sugar and when combined with the other sugary items one has for breakfast, one might as well have eaten a candy bar instead.
    For example a serving size of Lucky Charms (1 cup) and a cup of Blueberry Yoplait Yogurt are already 39 grams of sugar. The recommended daily amount of sugar is around 40 grams. This is a problem because it hard to consume only one gram of sugar for the rest of the day.
    Because of this, the organization has been accused of being a marketing tool. Because of the many unhealthful foods claiming to be healthy, one can only assume that these companies are trying to pass off there foods a healthful. They make more money by tricking the consumer into buying something that they think is good for them.
    The effect of this lure of “healthy foods” is the buying of more of these products. This instead of helping the consumers actually harms them. When they eat the foods they in turn will become more obese. After getting fatter, they will think that they need to eat more “healthy” foods. This throws the consumers on a vicious cycle and making their lives worse.
    Some people might debate and say that the company also certifies healthier foods such free range turkey and fresh vegetables. However, in our fast paced society, people rarely have time for a fresh home cooked meal; instead they just heat a tv dinner or go out for a quick bite just for the convenience.
    Just because a product has the “Healthy Choices” or any other logo, doesn’t ensure that the food is healthy. However, it should still be put into consideration while shopping. If the consumer uses their brain he or she can eliminate the obviously unhealthy food like Froot Loops and steered to the path of truly healthful choices. If everyone where to be mindful of what they buy and how much they consume, they can eliminate the need for these organizations, that are vulnerable to corruption, and truly begin to make smarter choices.

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    smart choices (with quotes!!!!!!!!)

    Post  raphaellu on Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:36 am

    FINAL
    Raphael Lu

    Smart Choices (with quotes!!!)
    As many people know, America is experiencing an epidemic of obesity. Numerous organizations have produced a health stamp that claims its food to be healthy such as the well-known Smart-spot found on every bag of Baked Cheetos or the “Sensible Choices” logo found on every box of those 100 Calorie Snacks. In this frenzy of healthy foods a new organization has emerged, replacing the old organizations by uniting the major food companies. These organizations were originally started to aide shoppers in making healthful food choices and hopefully resolve America’s obesity.
    However, many critics claim the standards to receive the stamp are way too lenient therefore allowing virtually any product to claim that it healthy. This in turn tricks the consumer into buying the products. Freshman Josephine Truong believes that “some food corporations are brainwashing young adults and children into thinking that some of their products are actually better for them.”
    The most debated section of the new organization is the category of breakfast items. The requirement for cereal is the maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving. 12 grams of sugar is approximately 3 teaspoons of sugar and when combined with the other sugary items one has for breakfast, one might as well have eaten a candy bar instead.
    For example a serving size of Lucky Charms (1 cup) and a cup of Blueberry Yoplait Yogurt are already 39 grams of sugar. The recommended daily amount of sugar is around 40 grams. This is a problem because it hard to consume only one gram of sugar for the rest of the day.
    Because of this, the organization has been accused of being a marketing tool. Because of the many unhealthful foods claiming to be healthy, one can only assume that these companies are trying to pass off there foods a healthful. They make more money by tricking the consumer into buying something that they think is good for them.
    The effect of this lure of “healthy foods” is the buying of more of these products. This instead of helping the consumers actually harms them. When they eat the foods they in turn will become more obese. After getting fatter, they will think that they need to eat more “healthy” foods. This throws the consumers on a vicious cycle and making their lives worse. To junior Bryant Zhong a health snack has “fiber, oats, wheat, grain, not to much sugar, food coloring, and preservatives.”
    Some people might debate and say that the company also certifies healthier foods such free range turkey and fresh vegetables. However, in our fast paced society, people rarely have time for a fresh home cooked meal; instead they just heat a tv dinner or go out for a quick bite just for the convenience.
    Just because a product has the “Healthy Choices” or any other logo, doesn’t ensure that the food is healthy. Senior student Greta Phoong is one of the more skeptical types, she doesn’t really believe in the logos. In stead she looks at the back labels and looks at all the fats and other contents” However, the logos can still be put into consideration while shopping. If the consumer uses their brain he or she can eliminate the obviously unhealthy food like Froot Loops and steered to the path of truly healthful choices. If everyone where to be mindful of what they buy and how much they consume, they can eliminate the need for these organizations, that are vulnerable to corruption, and truly begin to make smarter choices.

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Samart Choices

    Post  reginaliu on Thu Oct 08, 2009 10:50 pm

    As many people know, America is experiencing an epidemic of obesity. Numerous organizations have produced a health stamp that claims its food to be healthy such as the well-known Smart-spot found on every bag of Baked Cheetos or the “Sensible Choices” logo found on every box of those 100 Calorie Snacks. In this frenzy of healthy foods a new organization has emerged, replacing the old organizations by uniting the major food companies. These organizations were originally started to aide [aid (aide is a noun)] shoppers in making healthful food choices and hopefully resolve America’s obesity.
    However, many critics claim the standards to receive the stamp are way too lenient therefore allowing virtually any product to claim that it [is] healthy. This in turn tricks the consumer into buying the products. Freshman Josephine Truong believes that “some food corporations are brainwashing young adults and children into thinking that some of their products are actually better for them.”
    The most debated section of the new organization is the category of breakfast items. The requirement for cereal is the maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving. 12 grams of sugar is approximately 3 teaspoons of sugar and when combined with the other sugary items one has for breakfast, one might as well have eaten a candy bar instead.
    For example a serving size of Lucky Charms (1 cup) and a cup of Blueberry Yoplait Yogurt are already 39 grams of sugar. The recommended daily amount of sugar is around 40 grams. This is a problem because it hard to consume only one gram of sugar for the rest of the day.
    Because of this, the organization has been accused of being a marketing tool. Because of the many unhealthful foods claiming to be healthy, one can only assume that these companies are trying to pass off there [their] foods a [as] healthful [This sentence is confusing. Do you mean "Because of the many unhealthful foods claiming to be healthy, one can only assume whether or not the companies are just trying to pass off their products as healthful" or something of that nature? Also, don't let too many sentences start with "Because" in a row]. They make more money by tricking the consumer into buying something that they think is good for them.
    The effect of this lure of “healthy foods” is the buying of more of these products. [This is a little repetitive.] This instead of helping the consumers actually harms them. When they eat the foods they in turn [take out "in turn"] will become more obese. After getting fatter, they will think that they need to eat more “healthy” foods. This throws the consumers on a vicious cycle and making [makes] their lives worse. To junior Bryant Zhong a health snack has “fiber, oats, wheat, grain, not to [too] much sugar, food coloring [it's unclear if you're saying it should have food coloring or if it shouldn't], and preservatives.”
    Some people might debate and say that the company also certifies healthier foods such [as] free range turkey and fresh vegetables. However, in our fast paced society, people rarely have time for a fresh home cooked meal; instead they just heat a tv dinner or go out for a quick bite just for the convenience [This doesn't support your previous statement that some say that companies also certify genuinely healthy food nor does it contradict it].
    Just because a product has the “Healthy Choices” or any other logo, doesn’t ensure that the food is healthy. Senior student [take out "student"] Greta Phoong is one of the more skeptical types [skeptic], [replace comma with semi colon] she doesn’t really believe in the logos. In stead [Instead] she looks at the back labels and looks at all the fats and other contents” [Where did this quotation mark come from?] However, the logos can still be put into consideration while shopping. If the consumer uses their brain he or she can eliminate the obviously unhealthy food like Froot Loops and steered [verb tense] to the path of truly healthful choices. If everyone where [were] to be mindful of what they buy and how much they consume, they can [could] eliminate the need for these organizations, that are vulnerable to corruption, and truly begin to make smarter choices.

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    smart choices

    Post  raphaellu on Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:43 pm

    FINAL
    Raphael Lu

    Smart Choices (with quotes!!!)
    As many people know, America is experiencing an epidemic of obesity. Numerous organizations have produced a health stamp that claims its food to be healthy such as the well-known Smart-spot found on every bag of Baked Cheetos or the “Sensible Choices” logo found on every box of those 100 Calorie Snacks. In this frenzy of healthy foods a new organization has emerged, replacing the old organizations by uniting the major food companies. These organizations were originally started to aid shoppers in making healthful food choices and hopefully resolve America’s obesity.
    However, many critics claim the standards to receive the stamp are way too lenient therefore allowing virtually any product to claim that it is healthy. This in turn tricks the consumer into buying the products. Freshman Josephine Truong believes that “some food corporations are brainwashing young adults and children into thinking that some of their products are actually better for them.”
    The most debated section of the new organization is the category of breakfast items. The requirement for cereal is the maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving. 12 grams of sugar is approximately 3 teaspoons of sugar and when combined with the other sugary items one has for breakfast, one might as well have eaten a candy bar instead.
    For example a serving size of Lucky Charms (1 cup) and a cup of Blueberry Yoplait Yogurt are already 39 grams of sugar. The recommended daily amount of sugar is around 40 grams. This is a problem because it hard to consume only one gram of sugar for the rest of the day.
    Because of this, the organization has been accused of being a marketing tool. With all of the many unhealthful foods claiming to be healthy, one can only assume that these companies are trying to pass off these foods as healthful. They make more money by tricking the consumer into buying something that they think is good for them.
    These so called healthy foods create a lure for consumers. This instead of helping the consumers actually harms them. When they eat the foods they will become more obese. After getting fatter, they will think that they need to eat more “healthy” foods. This throws the consumers on a vicious cycle and makes their lives worse. To junior Bryant Zhong a health snack has “fiber, oats, wheat, and grain with not too much sugar, food coloring, and preservatives.”
    Just because a product has the “Healthy Choices” or any other logo, doesn’t ensure that the food is healthy. Senior Greta Phoong is one of the more skeptic types; she doesn’t really believe in the logos. Instead she looks at “the back labels and looks at all the fats and other contents” However, the logos can still be put into consideration while shopping. If the consumer uses their brain he or she can eliminate the obviously unhealthy food like Froot Loops and be steered to the path of truly healthful choices. If everyone were to be mindful of what they buy and how much they consume, they could eliminate the need for these organizations that are vulnerable to corruption, and truly begin to make smarter choices.

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Samart Choices

    Post  reginaliu on Fri Oct 09, 2009 11:28 pm

    As many people know, America is experiencing an epidemic of obesity. Numerous organizations have produced a health stamp that claims its food to be healthy such as the well-known Smart-spot found on every bag of Baked Cheetos or the “Sensible Choices” logo found on every box of those 100 Calorie Snacks. In this frenzy of healthy foods a new organization has emerged, replacing the old organizations by uniting the major food companies. These organizations were originally started to aid shoppers in making healthful food choices and hopefully resolve America’s obesity.
    However, many critics claim the standards to receive the stamp are way too lenient therefore allowing virtually any product to claim that it is healthy. This in turn tricks the consumer into buying the products. Freshman Josephine Truong believes that “some food corporations are brainwashing young adults and children into thinking that some of their products are actually better for them.”
    The most debated section of the new organization is the category of breakfast items. The requirement for cereal is the maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving. 12 [Twelve (Spell out figures when they begin a sentence)] grams of sugar is approximately 3 [three (spell out figures less than ten)] teaspoons of sugar and when combined with the other sugary items one has for breakfast, one might as well have eaten a candy bar instead.
    For example a serving size of Lucky Charms (1 cup) and a cup of Blueberry Yoplait Yogurt are already 39 grams of sugar. The recommended daily amount of sugar is around 40 grams. This is a problem because it [is] hard to consume only one gram of sugar for the rest of the day.
    Because of this, the organization has been accused of being a marketing tool. With all of the many unhealthful foods claiming to be healthy, one can only assume that these companies are trying to pass off these foods as healthful [This sentence doesn't make much sense]. They make more money by tricking the consumer into buying something that they think is good for them [when it fact, it is not].
    These so called healthy foods create a lure for consumers. This instead of helping the consumers actually harms them. When they eat the foods they will become more obese. After getting fatter, they will think that they need to eat more “healthy” foods. This throws the consumers on a vicious cycle and makes their lives worse. To junior Bryant Zhong a health snack has “fiber, oats, wheat, and grain with not too much sugar, food coloring, and preservatives.”
    Just because a product has the “Healthy Choices” or any other logo, doesn’t ensure that the food is healthy. Senior Greta Phoong is one of the more skeptic types; she doesn’t really believe in the logos. Instead she looks at “the back labels and looks at all the fats and other contents[.]” However, the logos can still be put [taken] into consideration while shopping. If the consumer uses their brain he or she can eliminate the obviously unhealthy food like Froot Loops and be steered to the path of truly healthful choices. If everyone were to be mindful of what they buy and how much they consume, they could eliminate the need for these organizations that are vulnerable to corruption, and truly begin to make smarter choices.

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    smart choices

    Post  raphaellu on Mon Oct 12, 2009 11:44 am

    (christine and michelle's correction are in here too) (working on the bad quotes)
    Smart Choices (with quotes!!!)
    As many people know, America is experiencing an epidemic of obesity. Numerous organizations have produced a health stamp that claims their food to be healthy such as the well-known Smart Spot found on every bag of Baked Cheetos or the “Sensible Solution” logo found on every box of those 100 Calorie Packs. In this frenzy of healthy foods, a new organization has emerged, replacing the old organizations by uniting the major food companies. These organizations were originally started to aid shoppers in making healthful food choices and hopefully resolve America’s obesity.
    However, many critics claim the standards to receive the stamp are way too lenient, therefore allowing virtually any company to claim that its products healthy. This tricks the consumer into buying their products. Freshman Josephine Truong believes that “some food corporations are brainwashing young adults and children into thinking that some of their products are actually better for them.”
    The most debated section of the new organization is the category of breakfast items. The requirement for cereal is the maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving which is approximately three teaspoons of sugar and when combined with the other sugary snacks during the day, one might as well have eaten a candy bar instead.
    For example, a serving size of Lucky Charms (1 cup) and a cup of Blueberry Yoplait Yogurt are already 39 grams of sugar! The recommended daily amount of sugar is around 40 grams. This produces a problem due to the fact that one is bound to eat other sugary snacks during the day.
    Because of this, these organizations have been accused of being a marketing tool. With all of the many unhealthful foods claiming to be healthy, one can only assume that these companies are trying to pass off these foods as healthful. This makes the consumers think that by buying their products they can become healthier.
    These so called healthy foods create a lure for consumers. This instead of helping the consumers actually harms them. When they eat the foods they will become more obese. After getting fatter, they will think that they need to eat more “healthy” foods. This throws the consumers on a vicious cycle and makes their lives worse. To junior Bryant Zhong a health snack has “fiber, oats, wheat, and grain with not too much sugar, food coloring, and preservatives.”
    Just because a product has the “Healthy Choices” or any other logo, doesn’t ensure that the food is healthy. Senior Greta Phoong is one of the more skeptic types; she doesn’t really believe in the logos. Instead she looks at “the back labels and looks at all the fats and other contents.” However, the logos can still be taken into consideration while shopping. If the consumer uses their brain he or she can eliminate the obviously unhealthy foods like Froot Loops and be steered to the path of truly healthful choices. If everyone were to be mindful of what they buy and how much they consume, they eliminate the need for these organizations that are vulnerable to corruption, and truly begin to make smarter choices.

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Samart Choices

    Post  reginaliu on Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:41 pm

    As many people know, America is experiencing an epidemic of obesity. Numerous organizations have produced a health stamp that claims their food to be healthy such as the well-known Smart Spot found on every bag of Baked Cheetos or the “Sensible Solution” logo found on every box of those 100 Calorie Packs. In this frenzy of healthy foods, a new organization has emerged, replacing the old organizations by uniting the major food companies. These organizations were originally started to aid shoppers in making healthful food choices and hopefully resolve America’s obesity.
    However, many critics claim the standards to receive the stamp are way too lenient, therefore allowing virtually any company to claim that its products healthy. This tricks the consumer into buying their products. Freshman Josephine Truong believes that “some food corporations are brainwashing young adults and children into thinking that some of their products are actually better for them.”
    The most debated section of the new organization is the category of breakfast items. The requirement for cereal is the maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving which is approximately three teaspoons of sugar and when combined with the other sugary snacks during the day, one might as well have eaten a candy bar instead.
    For example, a serving size of Lucky Charms (1 cup) and a cup of Blueberry Yoplait Yogurt are already 39 grams of sugar! The recommended daily amount of sugar is around 40 grams. This produces a problem due to the fact that one is bound to eat other sugary snacks during the day.
    Because of this, these organizations have been accused of being a marketing tool. With all of the many unhealthful foods claiming to be healthy, one can only assume that these companies are trying to pass off these foods as healthful [Take this sentence out and find a different transition]. This makes the consumers think that by buying their products they can become healthier.
    These so called healthy foods create a lure for consumers. This instead of helping the consumers actually harms them. When they eat the foods they will become more obese. After getting fatter, they will think that they need to eat more “healthy” foods. This throws the consumers on a vicious cycle and makes their lives worse. To junior Bryant Zhong a health snack has “fiber, oats, wheat, and grain with not too much sugar, food coloring, and preservatives.”
    Just because a product has the “Healthy Choices” or any other logo, doesn’t ensure that the food is healthy. Senior Greta Phoong is one of the more skeptic types; she doesn’t really believe in the logos. Instead she looks at “the back labels and looks at all the fats and other contents.” However, the logos can still be taken into consideration while shopping. If the consumer uses their brain he or she can eliminate the obviously unhealthy foods like Froot Loops and be steered to the path of truly healthful choices. If everyone were to be mindful of what they buy and how much they consume, they eliminate the need for these organizations that are vulnerable to corruption, and truly begin to make smarter choices.

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    smart choices

    Post  raphaellu on Tue Oct 13, 2009 12:13 am

    FINAL
    Smart Choices (only 2 quotes) (everyone else i interview, kept repeating what others said so I could only get two quotes)
    As many people know, America is experiencing an epidemic of obesity. Numerous organizations have produced a health stamp that claims their food to be healthy such as the well-known Smart Spot found on every bag of Baked Cheetos or the “Sensible Solution” logo found on every box of those 100 Calorie Packs. In this frenzy of healthy foods, a new organization has emerged, replacing the old organizations by uniting the major food companies. These organizations were originally started to aid shoppers in making healthful food choices and hopefully resolve America’s obesity.
    However, many critics claim the standards to receive the stamp are way too lenient, therefore allowing virtually any company to claim that its products healthy. This tricks the consumer into buying their products. Freshman Josephine Truong states that “if you read the nutrition facts, you’ll find out that it sill contains unhealthy things. It just has less and the original ones, but they go ahead and call it healthy. People these days are trying so hard to be healthier so the corporations takes advantage of that and brainwashes them.”
    The most debated section of the new organization is the category of breakfast items. The requirement for cereal is the maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving which is approximately three teaspoons of sugar and when combined with the other sugary snacks during the day, one might as well have eaten a candy bar instead.
    For example, a serving size of Lucky Charms (1 cup) and a cup of Blueberry Yoplait Yogurt are already 39 grams of sugar! The recommended daily amount of sugar is around 40 grams. This produces a problem due to the fact that one is bound to eat other sugary snacks during the day.
    Because of this, these organizations have been accused of being a marketing tool. With all of the obviously unhealthy foods that are trying to be healthy one can only think that the companies making these foods are using it as a marketing tool. This makes the consumers think that by buying their products they can become healthier.
    Just because a product has the “Healthy Choices” or any other logo, doesn’t ensure that the food is healthy. Senior Greta Phoong is one of the more skeptic types; she doesn’t really believe in the logos. Instead she looks at “the back labels and looks at all the fats and other contents.” However, the logos can still be taken into consideration while shopping. If the consumer uses their brain he or she can eliminate the obviously unhealthy foods like Froot Loops and be steered to the path of right decisions. If everyone were to be mindful of what they buy and how much they consume, they eliminate the need for these organizations that are vulnerable to corruption, and begin to make “Sensible Solutions.”

    reginaliu

    Posts : 189
    Join date : 2009-09-03

    Re: Samart Choices

    Post  reginaliu on Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:46 pm

    Smart Choices (only 2 quotes) (everyone else i interview, kept repeating what others said so I could only get two quotes)
    As many people know, America is experiencing an epidemic of obesity. Numerous organizations have produced a health stamp that claims their food to be healthy such as the well-known Smart Spot found on every bag of Baked Cheetos or the “Sensible Solution” logo found on every box of those 100 Calorie Packs. In this frenzy of healthy foods, a new organization has emerged, replacing the old organizations by uniting the major food companies. These organizations were originally started to aid shoppers in making healthful food choices and hopefully resolve America’s obesity.
    However, many critics claim the standards to receive the stamp are way too lenient, therefore allowing virtually any company to claim that its products healthy. This tricks the consumer into buying their products. Freshman Josephine Truong states that “if you read the nutrition facts, you’ll find out that it sill [still] contains unhealthy things. It just has less and the original ones, but they go ahead and call it healthy. People these days are trying so hard to be healthier so the corporations takes advantage of that and brainwashes them.”
    The most debated section of the new organization is the category of breakfast items. The requirement for cereal is the maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving which is approximately three teaspoons of sugar and when combined with the other sugary snacks during the day, one might as well have eaten a candy bar instead.
    For example, a serving size of Lucky Charms (1 cup) and a cup of Blueberry Yoplait Yogurt are already 39 grams of sugar! The recommended daily amount of sugar is around 40 grams. This produces a problem due to the fact that one is bound to eat other sugary snacks during the day.
    Because of this, these organizations have been accused of being a marketing tool. With all of the obviously unhealthy foods that are trying to be healthy one can only think that the companies making these foods are using it as a marketing tool. [It still doesn't make that much sense and it doesn't connect well with the next sentence.] This makes the consumers think that by buying their products they can become healthier.
    Just because a product has the “Healthy Choices” or any other logo, doesn’t ensure that the food is healthy. Senior Greta Phoong is one of the more skeptic types; she doesn’t really believe in the logos. Instead she looks at “the back labels and looks at all the fats and other contents.” However, the logos can still be taken into consideration while shopping. If the consumer uses their brain he or she can eliminate the obviously unhealthy foods like Froot Loops and be steered to the path of right decisions. If everyone were to be mindful of what they buy and how much they consume, they eliminate the need for these organizations that are vulnerable to corruption, and begin to make “Sensible Solutions. [don't capitalize]

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    smart choices

    Post  raphaellu on Tue Oct 13, 2009 9:20 pm

    As many people know, America is experiencing an epidemic of obesity. Numerous organizations have produced a health stamp that claims their food to be healthy such as the well-known Smart Spot found on every bag of Baked Cheetos or the “Sensible Solution” logo found on every box of those 100 Calorie Packs. In this frenzy of healthy foods, a new organization has emerged, replacing the old organizations by uniting the major food companies. These organizations were originally started to aid shoppers in making healthful food choices and hopefully resolve America’s obesity.
    However, many critics claim the standards to receive the stamp are way too lenient, therefore allowing virtually any company to claim that its products healthy. This tricks the consumer into buying their products. Freshman Josephine Truong states that “if you read the nutrition facts, you’ll find out that it still contains unhealthy things. It just has less and the original ones, but they go ahead and call it healthy. People these days are trying so hard to be healthier so the corporations takes advantage of that and brainwashes them.”
    The most debated section of the new organization is the category of breakfast items. The requirement for cereal is the maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving which is approximately three teaspoons of sugar and when combined with the other sugary snacks during the day, one might as well have eaten a candy bar instead.
    For example, a serving size of Lucky Charms (1 cup) and a cup of Blueberry Yoplait Yogurt are already 39 grams of sugar! The recommended daily amount of sugar is around 40 grams. This produces a problem due to the fact that one is bound to eat other sugary snacks during the day.
    Because of this, these organizations have been accused of being a marketing tool. Many other food categories have also deceivingly been called healthy. This makes the consumers think that by buying their products they can become healthier.
    Just because a product has the “Healthy Choices” or any other logo, doesn’t ensure that the food is healthy. Senior Greta Phoong is one of the more skeptic types; she doesn’t really believe in the logos. Instead she looks at “the back labels and looks at all the fats and other contents.” However, the logos can still be taken into consideration while shopping. If the consumer uses their brain he or she can eliminate the obviously unhealthy foods like Froot Loops and be steered to the path of right decisions. If everyone were to be mindful of what they buy and how much they consume, they eliminate the need for these organizations that are vulnerable to corruption, and begin to make “sensible solutions.”

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