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    amyleong

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2009-09-09

    Foods That Look Healthy

    Post  amyleong on Wed Oct 07, 2009 1:10 am

    This October, your food is in disguised for Halloween, but for the most part, it actually has been hidden for years. If you didn’t know, most food that you eat is “camouflaged,” or in another words causing you to think that they are good for you. However, if you look closely into the ingredients, most of them are not as healthy as you think.



    The chaos of calories begins in the morning as soon as you grab breakfast on your way to school. One example includes your neighborhood-friendly yogurt, which supposedly holds all the ingredients ensured for a healthy choice at the grocery store. On the down side, yogurt contains loads of corn syrup and sweeteners. Those that do include fruit at the bottom generally have twice the amount of sugar, adding to the amount of calories and if you add nuts, it is increasing the amount of fat. Although, it is a better alternative to junk food, yogurt does have its downfalls.



    Another food that is filled with fiber, whole-grain nuts, and dried fruits pertains to granola bars, another delicious, yet misleading snack. Although it does contain small quantities of vitamins and fiber, granola bars contain high amounts of carbohydrates and artificial ingredients, including the sugary syrups and chocolate chips. Along with these delectable bites, rice cakes also share the high amounts of fat as well as trans fat. Even though the box may boasts of its low-cholesterol and whole grains, flavored rice cakes generally add fat, and can add up quickly.



    As for lunch time, most of us usually pack a sandwich with packed meats such as turkey or ham. Though it may make the perfect lunch, these packaged meats contribute to the downside of your diet by its greater attributes of sodium. An intake of packaged turkey is one-third of the maximum daily recommended amount, so try to buy fresh meat or turn to low-sodium varieties to keep within your sodium intake.



    Furthermore, another food that you should minimize is sushi made with white rice and imitation crab meat. Only seen as an intake of carbohydrates, sushi is not recognized for its following features. First of all, it contains high glycemics, calories, and carbohydrates. In case you did not know, glycemics refer to the high fructose sugars and white flour, which may lead to killer diseases in the future. In addition, there is only a small amount of protein in each serving and the imitation crab meat is also another word for sugar. For a healthier choice, try to use real sushi made with salmon or tuna.



    Although many believe that soy products are healthy, there are many disagreements arguing its increased amounts of cancers. The most important aspect is that soy is linked to increase estrogen in males, and breast cancer in women. Unfortunately, these products also endorse hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, and infertility. So instead of taking the route of increased diseases, try any high protein food instead, such as brown rice or whole grains and be soy-free.



    Now that you know the “hidden disguises” of these delicious deceptive delectables, beware of the food that you eat because even the boxes marked low fat or include vitamins can be crucial to your health. Take the healthy route by looking closely at your ingredients; even though they may look delicious, they might not be as healthy as you think. Beware of this chaos of calories, and I hope you are reminded that these foods can lead to the downside of your diet.

    hanarudolph

    Posts : 152
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Foods That Look Healthy

    Post  hanarudolph on Sun Oct 11, 2009 10:14 am

    This October, your food is [change to "may be" in disguised [change to "disguise"] for Halloween, but for the most part, it [unclear antecedent- my food has been hidden? i know where my food is. do u mean ingredients?or you can say "it has been keeping secrets for years."] actually has been hidden for years. If you didn’t know, most of the food that you eat is “camouflaged,” or in another words, causing you to think that they ["it"- you need to keep the same pronoun going; "most" is also singular] are [and change "are" to "is"] good for you [parallel structure! "or in other words, it causes you to think that it is good for you."]. However, if you look closely into [change to "at"] the ingredients, most of them [your antecedent is unclear again-- the ingredients aren't ambiguous, it's the food that mistakenly thought as healthy.] are not as healthy as you think.


    [no need for some many spaces! delete! after all your paragraphs!]
    The chaos of calories begins in the morning as soon as you grab breakfast on your way to school. One example includes your neighborhood-friendly yogurt, which supposedly holds all the ingredients ensured for a healthy choice at the grocery store. On the down side, yogurt contains loads of corn syrup and sweeteners. Those that do include fruit at the bottom generally have twice the amount of sugar, adding to the amount of calories and if you add nuts, it is increasing the amount of fat. Although, it is a better alternative to junk food, yogurt does have its downfalls. The chaos of calories begins in the morning as you grab breakfast on your way to school. That neighborhood-friendly [what does that even mean, by the way?] yogurt, which supposedly ensures all the ingredients needed for a healthy day at school, actually contains loads of corn syrup and sweeteners. Yogurt with fruit at the bottom is even worse, generally having twice the regular amount of sugar and multiplying that calorie intake. Nuts increase the amount of fat. So while yogurt is better than junk food, think twice: it has its issues too.]



    Another food that is filled with fiber, whole-grain nuts, and dried fruits pertains to granola bars, another delicious, yet misleading snack. Although it does contain small quantities of vitamins and fiber, granola bars contain high amounts of carbohydrates and artificial ingredients, including the sugary syrups and chocolate chips. Along with these delectable bites, rice cakes also share the high amounts of fat as well as trans fat. Even though the box may boasts of its low-cholesterol and whole grains, flavored rice cakes generally add fat, and can add up quickly. [Want another false advertiser? Think granola bars, another delicious yet misleading snack filled with fiber, whole-grain nuts, and dried fruits. While they do contain small quantities of vitamins and fiber, granola bars contain high amounts of carbohydrates and artificial ingredients, such as the sugary syrup and chocolate chips. Rice cakes also share high amounts of fat, not to mention trans fat. Even though the box boasts of low-cholesterol and whole grains, flavored rice cakes are full of fat... which we all know can add up.]



    As for lunch time, most of us usually pack a sandwich with packed meats such as turkey or ham. Though it may make the perfect lunch, these packaged meats contribute to the downside of your diet by its greater attributes of sodium. An intake of packaged turkey is one-third of the maximum daily recommended amount, so try to buy fresh meat or turn to low-sodium varieties to keep within your sodium intake. [As for lunch time, many of us often pack sandwiches with deli meat such as turkey or ham. These packaged meats may make the perfect lunch, but they're not so great for your diet with the amount of sodium they provide. An intake of packaged turkey is one-third the maximum daily-recommended amount, so try to buy fresh meat or turn to low-sodium options in order to maintain a healthy sodium intake.]



    Furthermore, another food that you should minimize is sushi made with white rice and imitation crab meat. Only seen as an intake of carbohydrates, sushi is not recognized for its following features. First of all, it contains high glycemics, calories, and carbohydrates. In case you did not know, glycemics refer to the high fructose sugars and white flour, which may lead to killer diseases in the future. In addition, there is only a small amount of protein in each serving and the imitation crab meat is also another word for sugar. For a healthier choice, try to use real sushi made with salmon or tuna. The sushi with white rice and imitation crab meat bought at convenience stores is also a bad idea. Sushi is not just a source of carbohydrates-- it also contains high glycemics, and thus calories. Glycemics refers to the high fructose sugars in the white flour, which, if you want a disease-free future, you may want to avoid. As for the imitation crab meat, there's very little protein and a whole lot of sugar. For a healthier choice, try real sushi with salmon or tuna.]



    Although many believe that soy products are healthy, there are many disagreements arguing its increased amounts of cancers. The most important aspect is that soy is linked to increase estrogen in males, and breast cancer in women. Unfortunately, these products also endorse hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, and infertility. So instead of taking the route of increased diseases, try any high protein food instead, such as brown rice or whole grains and be soy-free. Even soy products are argued to be a possible cause of cancer. You may think it's healthy, but really, soy has been linked to increased amounts of estrogen in men and breast cancer for women. Unfortunately, these products can also be a source of hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, and infertility. So rather increase your chance for disease, try high protein foods, such as brown rice or whole grains. [You may not want to say be soy-free because some people are recommended by doctors to have a soy diet. like me, for instance: i can't drink milk because of allergies, and my dad drinks soy-milk be cause he's lactose intolerant. soy can be a good alternative for some people.]]



    Now that you know the “hidden [delete "hidden" and quotation marks] disguises” of these delicious but deceptive delectables, beware of the food that [delete "that"] you eat, because even the boxes marked "low fat" or include vitamins [change "include vitamins" to "Vitamin __" (with quotation marks)] can be crucial to your health. Take the healthy route by looking closely [change "looking closely" to "carefully inspecting"] at [delete "at"] your ingredients; even though they [the antecedent is wrong again: the food looks delicious, not the ingredients as you're suggesting] may look delicious, they might not be as healthy as you think. Beware of this chaos of calories, and I hope you are reminded that these foods can lead to the downside of your diet. [This last sentence is awkward. Delete and come up with a better conclusion.]

    amyleong

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2009-09-09

    Foods That Look Healthy Revision

    Post  amyleong on Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:22 pm

    This October, your food may be in disguise for Halloween, but for the most part, it has been keeping secrets for years. If you didn’t know, most of the food that you eat is “camouflaged,” or in other words, it causes you to think that it is good for you. However, if you look closely at the ingredients, most of them are not as healthy as you think.


    The chaos of calories begins in the morning as you grab breakfast on your way to school. That neighborhood-friendly yogurt, which supposedly ensures all the ingredients needed for a healthy day at school, actually contains loads of corn syrup and sweeteners. Yogurt with fruit at the bottom is even worse, generally having twice the regular amount of sugar and multiplying that calorie intake. Nuts increase the amount of fat. So while yogurt is better than junk food, think twice: it has its issues too.


    Want another false advertiser? Think granola bars, another delicious yet misleading snack filled with fiber, whole-grain nuts, and dried fruits. While they do contain small quantities of vitamins and fiber, granola bars contain high amounts of carbohydrates and artificial ingredients, such as the sugary syrup and chocolate chips. Rice cakes also share high amounts of fat, not to mention trans fat. Even though the box boasts of low-cholesterol and whole grains, flavored rice cakes are full of fat, which we all know can add up.

    As for lunch time, many of us often pack sandwiches with deli meat such as turkey or ham. These packaged meats may make the perfect lunch, but they're not so great for your diet with the amount of sodium they provide. An intake of packaged turkey is one-third the maximum daily-recommended amount, so try to buy fresh meat or turn to low-sodium options in order to maintain a healthy sodium intake.

    The sushi with white rice and imitation crab meat bought at convenience stores is also a bad idea. Sushi is not just a source of carbohydrates-- it also contains high glycemics, and thus calories. Glycemics refers to the high fructose sugars in the white flour, which, if you want a disease-free future, you may want to avoid. As for the imitation crab meat, there's very little protein and a whole lot of sugar. For a healthier choice, try sushi with real salmon or tuna.

    Even soy products are argued to be a possible cause of cancer. You may think it's healthy, but really, soy has been linked to increased amounts of estrogen in men and breast cancer for women. Unfortunately, these products can also be a source of hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, and infertility. So rather increase your chance for disease, try high protein foods, such as brown rice or whole grains.

    Now that you know the “disguises” of these
    delicious but deceptive delectables, beware of the food that you eat, because even the boxes marked "low fat" or include vitamins can be crucial to your health. Take the healthy route by carefully inspecting your ingredients; even though the food may look delicious, they might not be as healthy as you think.

    hanarudolph

    Posts : 152
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Foods That Look Healthy

    Post  hanarudolph on Mon Oct 12, 2009 11:43 am

    Now that you know the “disguises” of these delicious but deceptive delectables, beware of the food that you eat, because even the boxes marked "low fat!" or "includes vitamins!" can be crucial to your health. Take the healthy route by carefully inspecting your ingredients; even though the food may look delicious, they might not be as healthy as you think. go back to the disguise theme to wrap up your article: "even though the food may look delicious, it could just be playing tricks on you." or something like that.

    amyleong

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2009-09-09

    Foods That Looks Healthy Revision

    Post  amyleong on Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:00 pm

    This October, your food may be in disguise for Halloween, but for the most part, it has been keeping secrets for years. If you didn’t know, most of the food that you eat is “camouflaged,” or in other words, it causes you to think that it is good for you. However, if you look closely at the ingredients, most of them are not as healthy as you think.

    The chaos of calories begins in the morning as you grab breakfast on your way to school. That neighborhood-friendly yogurt, which supposedly ensures all the ingredients needed for a healthy day at school, actually contains loads of corn syrup and sweeteners. Yogurt with fruit at the bottom is even worse, generally having twice the regular amount of sugar and multiplying that calorie intake. Nuts increase the amount of fat. So while yogurt is better than junk food, think twice: it has its issues too.

    Want another false advertiser? Think granola bars, another delicious yet misleading snack filled with fiber, whole-grain nuts, and dried fruits. While they do contain small quantities of vitamins and fiber, granola bars contain high amounts of carbohydrates and artificial ingredients, such as the sugary syrup and chocolate chips. Rice cakes also share high amounts of fat, not to mention trans fat. Even though the box boasts of low-cholesterol and whole grains, flavored rice cakes are full of fat, which we all know can add up.

    As for lunch time, many of us often pack sandwiches with deli meat such as turkey or ham. These packaged meats may make the perfect lunch, but they're not so great for your diet with the amount of sodium they provide. An intake of packaged turkey is one-third the maximum daily-recommended amount, so try to buy fresh meat or turn to low-sodium options in order to maintain a healthy sodium intake.

    The sushi with white rice and imitation crab meat bought at convenience stores is also a bad idea. Sushi is not just a source of carbohydrates-- it also contains high glycemics, and thus calories. Glycemics refers to the high fructose sugars in the white flour, which, if you want a disease-free future, you may want to avoid. As for the imitation crab meat, there's very little protein and a whole lot of sugar. For a healthier choice, try sushi with real salmon or tuna.

    Even soy products are argued to be a possible cause of cancer. You may think it's healthy, but really, soy has been linked to increased amounts of estrogen in men and breast cancer for women. Unfortunately, these products can also be a source of hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, and infertility. So rather increase your chance for disease, try high protein foods, such as brown rice or whole grains.

    Now that you know the “disguises” of these delicious but deceptive delectables, beware of the food that you eat, because even the boxes marked "low fat!" or "includes vitamins!" can be crucial to your health. Take the healthy route by carefully inspecting your ingredients. Even though the food may look delicious, it could just be playing tricks on you.

    hanarudolph

    Posts : 152
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Foods That Look Healthy

    Post  hanarudolph on Tue Oct 13, 2009 11:51 am

    This October, your food may be in disguise for Halloween, but for the most part, it has been keeping secrets for years. If you didn’t know, most of the food that you eat is “camouflaged,” or in other words, it causes you to think that it is [keep the contractions consistent! either have them or don't have them at all-- and check the rest of your article for consistency as well.] good for you. However, if you look closely at the ingredients, most of them are not as healthy as you think.

    The chaos of calories begins in the morning as you grab breakfast on your way to school. That neighborhood-friendly [again, what does "neighborhood-friendly" mean?] yogurt, which supposedly ensures all the ingredients needed for a healthy day at school, actually contains loads of corn syrup and sweeteners. Yogurt with fruit at the bottom is even worse, generally having twice the regular amount of sugar and multiplying that calorie intake. Nuts increase the amount of fat. So while yogurt is better than junk food, think twice: it has its issues too.

    Want another false advertiser? Think granola bars, another delicious yet misleading snack filled with fiber, whole-grain nuts, and dried fruits. While they do contain small quantities of vitamins and fiber, granola bars contain high amounts of carbohydrates and artificial ingredients, such as the sugary syrup and chocolate chips. Rice cakes also share high amounts of fat, not to mention trans fat. Even though the box boasts of low-cholesterol and whole grains, flavored rice cakes are full of fat, which we all know can add up.

    As for lunch time, many of us often pack sandwiches with deli meat such as turkey or ham. These packaged meats may make the perfect lunch, but they're not so great for your diet with the amount of sodium they provide. An intake of packaged turkey is one-third the maximum daily-recommended amount, so try to buy fresh meat or turn to low-sodium options in order to maintain a healthy sodium intake.

    The sushi with white rice and imitation crab meat bought at convenience stores is also a bad idea. Sushi is not just a source of carbohydrates-- it also contains high glycemics, and thus calories. Glycemics refers to the high fructose sugars in the white flour, which, if you want a disease-free future, you may want to avoid. As for the imitation crab meat, there's very little protein and a whole lot of sugar. For a healthier choice, try sushi with real salmon or tuna.

    Even soy products are argued to be a possible cause of cancer. You may think it's healthy, but really, soy has been linked to increased amounts of estrogen in men and breast cancer for women. Unfortunately, these products can also be a source of hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, and infertility. So rather than increase your chance for [reword to "of" disease, try high-protein foods, such as brown rice or whole grains.

    Now that you know the “disguises” of these delicious but deceptive delectables, beware of the food that you eat, because even the boxes marked "low fat!" or "includes vitamins!" can be crucial [change "crucial" to a negative word synonymous to "bad"]to your health. Take the healthy route by carefully inspecting your ingredients. Even though [change to "if"] the food may look [change "may look" to "looks"] delicious, it could just be playing tricks on you.

    amyleong

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2009-09-09

    Foods That Look Healthy

    Post  amyleong on Tue Oct 13, 2009 5:34 pm

    This October, your food may be in disguise for Halloween, but for the most part, it has been keeping secrets for years. If you didn’t know, most of the food that you eat is “camouflaged,” or in other words, it causes you to think that it’s good for you. However, if you look closely at the ingredients, most of them are not as healthy as you think.

    The chaos of calories begins in the morning as you grab breakfast on your way to school. That neighborhood-friendly yogurt, which supposedly ensures all the ingredients needed for a healthy day at school, actually contains loads of corn syrup and sweeteners. Yogurt with fruit at the bottom is even worse, generally having twice the regular amount of sugar and multiplying that calorie intake. Nuts increase the amount of fat. So while yogurt is better than junk food, think twice: it has its issues too.

    Want another false advertiser? Think granola bars, another delicious yet misleading snack filled with fiber, whole-grain nuts, and dried fruits. While they do contain small quantities of vitamins and fiber, granola bars contain high amounts of carbohydrates and artificial ingredients, such as the sugary syrup and chocolate chips. Rice cakes also share high amounts of fat, not to mention trans fat. Even though the box boasts of low-cholesterol and whole grains, flavored rice cakes are full of fat, which we all know can add up.

    As for lunch time, many of us often pack sandwiches with deli meat such as turkey or ham. These packaged meats may make the perfect lunch, but they're not so great for your diet with the amount of sodium they provide. An intake of packaged turkey is one-third the maximum daily-recommended amount, so try to buy fresh meat or turn to low-sodium options in order to maintain a healthy sodium intake.

    The sushi with white rice and imitation crab meat bought at convenience stores is also a bad idea. Sushi is not just a source of carbohydrates-- it also contains high glycemics, and thus calories. Glycemics refers to the high fructose sugars in the white flour, which, if you want a disease-free future, you may want to avoid. As for the imitation crab meat, there's very little protein and a whole lot of sugar. For a healthier choice, try sushi with real salmon or tuna.

    Even soy products are argued to be a possible cause of cancer. You may think it's healthy, but really, soy has been linked to increased amounts of estrogen in men and breast cancer for women. Unfortunately, these products can also be a source of hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, and infertility. So
    rather than increase your chance of disease, try high-protein foods, such as brown rice or whole grains.

    Now that you know the “disguises” of these delicious but deceptive delectables, beware of the food that you eat, because even the boxes marked "low fat!" or "includes vitamins!" can be crucial to your health. Take the healthy route by carefully inspecting your
    ingredients. If the food looks delicious, it could just be playing tricks on you.



    *Hey Hana! Thanks for the corrections. My article flows much better now. Anyway, the neighborhood-friendly part just means that yogurt is one of the snacks that most of us eat everyday and seems healthy to us, so I'm just going to leave that part. Is that okay?

    hanarudolph

    Posts : 152
    Join date : 2009-09-01

    Re: Foods That Look Healthy

    Post  hanarudolph on Tue Oct 13, 2009 6:54 pm

    Ummm... it's still awkward, but okay then-- it's not hugely noticeable *shrug*
    One more thing: (I liked it with the "even")
    Now that you know the “disguises” of these delicious but deceptive delectables, beware of the food that you eat, because even the boxes marked "low fat!" or "includes vitamins!" can be crucial to your health. Take the healthy route by carefully inspecting your ingredients. Even If the food looks delicious, it could just be playing tricks on you.

    amyleong

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2009-09-09

    Revision

    Post  amyleong on Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:11 pm

    This October, your food may be in disguise for Halloween, but for the most part, it has been keeping secrets for years. If you didn’t know, most of the food that you eat is “camouflaged,” or in other words, it causes you to think that it’s good for you. However, if you look closely at the ingredients, most of them are not as healthy as you think.

    The chaos of calories begins in the morning as you grab breakfast on your way to school. That neighborhood-friendly yogurt, which supposedly ensures all the ingredients needed for a healthy day at school, actually contains loads of corn syrup and sweeteners. Yogurt with fruit at the bottom is even worse, generally having twice the regular amount of sugar and multiplying that calorie intake. Nuts increase the amount of fat. So while yogurt is better than junk food, think twice: it has its issues too.

    Want another false advertiser? Think granola bars, another delicious yet misleading snack filled with fiber, whole-grain nuts, and dried fruits. While they do contain small quantities of vitamins and fiber, granola bars contain high amounts of carbohydrates and artificial ingredients, such as the sugary syrup and chocolate chips. Rice cakes also share high amounts of fat, not to mention trans fat. Even though the box boasts of low-cholesterol and whole grains, flavored rice cakes are full of fat, which we all know can add up.

    As for lunch time, many of us often pack sandwiches with deli meat such as turkey or ham. These packaged meats may make the perfect lunch, but they're not so great for your diet with the amount of sodium they provide. An intake of packaged turkey is one-third the maximum daily-recommended amount, so try to buy fresh meat or turn to low-sodium options in order to maintain a healthy sodium intake.

    The sushi with white rice and imitation crab meat bought at convenience stores is also a bad idea. Sushi is not just a source of carbohydrates-- it also contains high glycemics, and thus calories. Glycemics refers to the high fructose sugars in the white flour, which, if you want a disease-free future, you may want to avoid. As for the imitation crab meat, there's very little protein and a whole lot of sugar. For a healthier choice, try sushi with real salmon or tuna.

    Even soy products are argued to be a possible cause of cancer. You may think it's healthy, but really, soy has been linked to increased amounts of estrogen in men and breast cancer for women. Unfortunately, these products can also be a source of hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, and infertility. So rather than increase your chance of disease, try high-protein foods, such as brown rice or whole grains.

    Now that you know the “disguises” of these delicious but deceptive delectables, beware of the food that you eat, because even the boxes marked "low fat!" or "includes vitamins!" can be crucial to your health. Take the healthy route by carefully inspecting your ingredients. Even if the food looks delicious, it could just be playing tricks on you.

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