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    evandelgado

    Posts : 47
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Trashed Beaches/ Runoff

    Post  evandelgado on Tue Feb 02, 2010 8:29 am

    Trash-Strewn Beaches
    Evan Delgado, staff writer
    California was recently struck with a series of storms, pounding California with sheets of rain. Although the rain did wonders for the near-drought situation in California, it also revealed shocking pollution, especially on public beaches. Swirling winds and pouring water forced trash and debris into rivers, which eventually find their way to beaches and the ocean. Beaches near river mouths were hit especially hard. Seal Beach certainly felt the impact of the rain storms, its previously clear, beautiful sands littered with shopping carts, bicycle tires, shoes, and thousands upon thousands of plastic cups and bottles. Many beachgoers were shocked by the change in their beloved beaches, although some specialists believe that the pollution has decreased over time. Seal Beach was besieged with mounts of refuse that had flowed down the San Gabriel River, runs from the Angeles National Forest through the Santa Fe Flood Control Basin and is 75 miles long. In Long Beach, the sands were also covered with trash due to the Los Angeles River.
    The state of the beaches raises some issues about pollution and urbanization. The polluted areas near river mouths are also said to be dangerous, and people are advised to avoid them due to fear of contamination and bacteria in the area. The cause of the pollution in the rivers is a direct effect of urbanization, and a new ordinance has been considered in California to control runoff with small, cost-effective natural systems. Many hope that the ordinance will be approved in the next six months and go into effect by 2011.
    In Arcadia, we may not see the damage to California’s beaches firsthand, but it is important for us to understand the consequences of pollution. “It's definitely tough to be more environmentally conscientious but what our generation needs to realize is that all the pollution that floats around eventually harms us and our children to come.” says freshman president Tricia Xu. One thing we can people can do is recycle whatever they can.

    *I have a few quotes in the works (waiting for a response)
    **I’m still looking for stuff to add but each paragraph has it’s topic

    evandelgado

    Posts : 47
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Trashed Beaches/ Runoff

    Post  evandelgado on Tue Feb 02, 2010 5:41 pm

    Trash-Strewn Beaches
    Evan Delgado, staff writer
    California was recently struck with a series of storms, pounding California with sheets of rain. Although the rain did wonders for the near-drought situation in California, it also revealed shocking pollution, especially on public beaches. Swirling winds and pouring water forced trash and debris into rivers, which eventually found their way to beaches and the ocean, and as result beaches near river mouths were covered with a wide variety of trash and everyday objects. Seal Beach certainly felt the impact of the rain storms, its previously clear, beautiful sands are now littered with shopping carts, bicycle tires, shoes, and thousands upon thousands of plastic cups and bottles. Many beachgoers were shocked by the state of their beloved beaches. Seal Beach’s pristine image was destroyed due to the refuse that had flowed down the San Gabriel River, which runs from the Angeles National Forest through the Santa Fe Flood Control Basin and is 75 miles long. In Long Beach, the sands were also covered with trash due to the Los Angeles River. Junior Leslie Chang said,” What’s contributing to the build-up of pollution is how apathetic some people are regarding our current situation. Every day after lunch, there are at least five water bottles left on the tables, not to mention all the empty chip bags and lunch trays lying around. Really, have we gotten so lazy that we cannot pick up our trash and throw it in the recycling bin or trash can that's three feet away?” said junior Leslie Chang.
    The state of the beaches raises some issues about pollution and urbanization. The polluted areas near river mouths are also said to be dangerous, and people are advised to avoid them due to fear of contamination and bacteria in the area. The cause of the pollution in the rivers is a direct effect of urbanization, and a new ordinance has been considered in California to control runoff with small, cost-effective natural systems. Many hope that the ordinance will be approved in the next six months and go into effect by 2011.
    In Arcadia, we may not see the damage to California’s beaches firsthand, but it is important for us to understand the consequences of pollution. “It's definitely tough to be more environmentally conscientious but what our generation needs to realize is that all the pollution that floats around eventually harms us and our children to come,” said freshman president Tricia Xu. One thing people can do is recycle whatever they can. The pollution problem is largely man-made, but people can do their part to clean up their streets and their planet. “Disregarding our litter may not be a problem on the first day, nor the second, but soon enough we will pay for our mistakes. But by then it would be too late,” said Chang.

    evandelgado

    Posts : 47
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Trashed Beaches/ Runoff

    Post  evandelgado on Wed Feb 03, 2010 5:06 pm

    Trash-Strewn Beaches
    Evan Delgado, staff writer
    California was recently struck with a series of storms, pounding California with sheets of rain. Although the rain did wonders for the near-drought situation in California, it also revealed shocking pollution, especially on public beaches. Swirling winds and pouring water forced trash and debris into rivers, which eventually found their way to beaches and the ocean, and as result beaches near river mouths were covered with a wide variety of trash and everyday objects. Seal Beach certainly felt the impact of the rain storms. Its previously clear, beautiful sands are now littered with shopping carts, bicycle tires, shoes, and thousands upon thousands of plastic cups and bottles. Many beachgoers were shocked by the state of their beloved beaches. Seal Beach’s pristine image was destroyed due to the refuse that had flowed down the San Gabriel River, which runs from the Angeles National Forest through the Santa Fe Flood Control Basin and is 75 miles long. In Long Beach, the sands were also covered with trash due to the Los Angeles River. Junior Leslie Chang said,” What’s contributing to the build-up of pollution is how apathetic some people are regarding our current situation. Every day after lunch, there are at least five water bottles left on the tables, not to mention all the empty chip bags and lunch trays lying around. Really, have we gotten so lazy that we cannot pick up our trash and throw it in the recycling bin or trash can that's three feet away?” said junior Leslie Chang.
    The state of the beaches raises some issues about pollution and urbanization. The polluted areas near river mouths are also said to be dangerous, and people are advised to avoid them due to fear of contamination and bacteria in the area. The cause of the pollution in the rivers is a direct effect of urbanization, and a new ordinance has been considered in California to control runoff with small, cost-effective natural systems. Many hope that the ordinance will be approved in the next six months and go into effect by 2011.
    In Arcadia, we may not see the damage to California’s beaches firsthand, but it is important for us to understand the consequences of pollution. “It's definitely tough to be more environmentally conscientious but what our generation needs to realize is that all the pollution that floats around eventually harms us and our children to come,” said freshman president Tricia Xu. One thing people can do is recycle whatever they can. The pollution problem is largely man-made, but people can do their part to clean up their streets and their planet. “Disregarding our litter may not be a problem on the first day, nor the second, but soon enough we will pay for our mistakes. But by then it would be too late,” said Chang.

    Joanna Liao

    Posts : 161
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 23

    Re: Trashed Beaches/ Runoff

    Post  Joanna Liao on Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:37 pm

    California was recently struck with a series of storms, pounding California with sheets of rain. Although the rain did wonders for the near-drought situation in California, it also revealed shocking pollution, especially on public beaches. Swirling winds and pouring water forced trash and debris into rivers, which eventually found their way to beaches and the ocean, (end sentence) and (delete and) as result (comma) beaches near river mouths were covered with a wide variety of trash and everyday objects. Seal Beach certainly felt the impact of the rain storms. Its previously clear, beautiful sands are now littered with shopping carts, bicycle tires, shoes, and thousands upon thousands of plastic cups and bottles. Many beachgoers were shocked by the state of their beloved beaches. Seal Beach’s pristine image was destroyed due to the refuse that had flowed down the San Gabriel River, which runs from the Angeles National Forest through the Santa Fe Flood Control Basin and is 75 miles long. In Long Beach, the sands were also covered with trash due to the Los Angeles River. Junior Leslie Chang said, “What’s contributing to the build-up of pollution is how apathetic some people are regarding our current situation. Every day after lunch, there are at least five water bottles left on the tables, not to mention all the empty chip bags and lunch trays lying around. Really, have we gotten so lazy that we cannot pick up our trash and throw it in the recycling bin or trash can that's three feet away?” said junior Leslie Chang. (delete: said leslie change LOL)
    The state of the beaches raises some issues about pollution and urbanization. The polluted areas near river mouths are also said to be dangerous, and people are advised to avoid them due to fear of contamination and bacteria in the area. The cause of the pollution in the rivers is a direct effect of urbanization, and a new ordinance has been considered in California to control runoff with small, cost-effective natural systems. Many hope that the ordinance will be approved in the next six months and go into effect by 2011.
    In Arcadia, we may not see the damage to California’s beaches firsthand, but it is important for us to understand the consequences of pollution. “It's definitely tough to be more environmentally conscientious but what our generation needs to realize is that all the pollution that floats around eventually harms us and our children to come,” said freshman president (president?... of wat?) Tricia Xu. One thing people can do is recycle whatever they can. The pollution problem is largely man-made, but people can do their part to clean up their streets and their planet. “Disregarding our litter may not be a problem on the first day, nor the second, but soon enough we will pay for our mistakes. But by then it would be too late,” said Chang.

    evandelgado

    Posts : 47
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Trashed Beaches/ Runoff

    Post  evandelgado on Wed Feb 03, 2010 10:36 pm

    California was recently struck with a series of storms, pounding California with sheets of rain. Although the rain did wonders for the near-drought situation in California, it also revealed shocking pollution, especially on public beaches. Swirling winds and pouring water forced trash and debris into rivers, which eventually found their way to beaches and the ocean. As result , beaches near river mouths were covered with a wide variety of trash and everyday objects. Seal Beach certainly felt the impact of the rain storms. Its previously clear, beautiful sands are now littered with shopping carts, bicycle tires, shoes, and thousands upon thousands of plastic cups and bottles. Many beachgoers were shocked by the state of their beloved beaches. Seal Beach’s pristine image was destroyed due to the refuse that had flowed down the San Gabriel River, which runs from the Angeles National Forest through the Santa Fe Flood Control Basin and is 75 miles long. In Long Beach, the sands were also covered with trash due to the Los Angeles River. Junior Leslie Chang said, “What’s contributing to the build-up of pollution is how apathetic some people are regarding our current situation. Every day after lunch, there are at least five water bottles left on the tables, not to mention all the empty chip bags and lunch trays lying around. Really, have we gotten so lazy that we cannot pick up our trash and throw it in the recycling bin or trash can that's three feet away?” urbanization. The polluted areas near river mouths are also said to be dangerous, and people are advised to avoid them due to fear of contamination and bacteria in the area. The cause of the pollution in the rivers is a direct effect of urbanization, and a new ordinance has been considered in California to control runoff with small, cost-effective natural systems. Many hope that the ordinance will be approved in the next six months and go into effect by 2011.
    In Arcadia, we may not see the damage to California’s beaches firsthand, but it is important for us to understand the consequences of pollution. “It's definitely tough to be more environmentally conscientious but what our generation needs to realize is that all the pollution that floats around eventually harms us and our children to come,” said freshman president Tricia Xu. One thing people can do is recycle whatever they can. The pollution problem is largely man-made, but people can do their part to clean up their streets and their planet. “Disregarding our litter may not be a problem on the first day, nor the second, but soon enough we will pay for our mistakes. But by then it would be too late,” said Chang.

    Joanna Liao

    Posts : 161
    Join date : 2009-09-01
    Age : 23

    Re: Trashed Beaches/ Runoff

    Post  Joanna Liao on Thu Feb 04, 2010 9:28 pm

    California was recently struck with a series of storms, pounding California with sheets of rain. Although the rain did wonders for the near-drought situation in California, it also revealed shocking pollution, especially on public beaches. Swirling winds and pouring water forced trash and debris into rivers, which eventually found their way to beaches and the ocean. As result, beaches near river mouths were covered with a wide variety of trash and everyday objects. Seal Beach certainly felt the impact of the rain storms (just pick one: rain or storm). Its previously clear, beautiful sands are now littered with shopping carts, bicycle tires, shoes, and thousands upon thousands of plastic cups and bottles. Many beachgoers were shocked by the state of their beloved beaches. Seal Beach’s pristine image was destroyed due to the refuse that had flowed down the San Gabriel River, which runs from the Angeles National Forest through the Santa Fe Flood Control Basin and is 75 miles long. In Long Beach, the sands were also covered with trash due to the Los Angeles River. Junior Leslie Chang said, “What’s contributing to the build-up of pollution is how apathetic some people are regarding our current situation. Every day after lunch, there are at least five water bottles left on the tables, not to mention all the empty chip bags and lunch trays lying around. Really, have we gotten so lazy that we cannot pick up our trash and throw it in the recycling bin or trash can that's three feet away?” urbanization (?). The polluted areas near river mouths are also said to be dangerous, and people are advised to avoid them due to fear of contamination and bacteria in the area. The cause of the pollution in the rivers is a direct effect of urbanization, and a new ordinance has been considered in California to control runoff with small, cost-effective natural systems. Many hope that the ordinance will be approved in the next six months and go into effect by 2011.
    In Arcadia, we may not see the damage to California’s beaches firsthand, but it is important for us to understand the consequences of pollution. “It's definitely tough to be more environmentally conscientious but what our generation needs to realize is that all the pollution that floats around eventually harms us and our children to come,” said freshman (asb?) president Tricia Xu. One thing people can do is recycle whatever they can. The pollution problem is largely man-made, but people can do their part to clean up their streets and their planet. “Disregarding our litter may not be a problem on the first day, nor the second, but soon enough we will pay for our mistakes. But by then it would be too late,” said Chang.

    evandelgado

    Posts : 47
    Join date : 2009-09-02

    Re: Trashed Beaches/ Runoff

    Post  evandelgado on Mon Feb 08, 2010 9:47 am

    Trashed Beaches a Result of Recent Storms
    by:Evan Delgado
    California was recently struck with a series of storms, pounding California with sheets of rain. Although the rain did wonders for the near-drought situation in California, it also revealed shocking pollution, especially on public beaches. Swirling winds and pouring water forced trash and debris into rivers, which eventually found their way to beaches and the ocean. As result, beaches near river mouths were covered with a wide variety of trash and everyday objects. Seal Beach certainly felt the impact of the rain. Its previously clear, beautiful sands are now littered with shopping carts, bicycle tires, shoes, and thousands upon thousands of plastic cups and bottles. Many beachgoers were shocked by the state of their beloved beaches. Seal Beach’s pristine image was destroyed due to the refuse that had flowed down the San Gabriel River, which runs from the Angeles National Forest through the Santa Fe Flood Control Basin and is 75 miles long. In Long Beach, the sands were also covered with trash due to the Los Angeles River. Junior Leslie Chang said, “What’s contributing to the build-up of pollution is how apathetic some people are regarding our current situation. Every day after lunch, there are at least five water bottles left on the tables, not to mention all the empty chip bags and lunch trays lying around. Really, have we gotten so lazy that we cannot pick up our trash and throw it in the recycling bin or trash can that's three feet away?” The polluted areas near river mouths are also said to be dangerous, and people are advised to avoid them due to fear of contamination and bacteria in the area. The cause of the pollution in the rivers is a direct effect of urbanization, and a new ordinance has been considered in California to control runoff with small, cost-effective natural systems. Many hope that the ordinance will be approved in the next six months and go into effect by 2011.
    In Arcadia, we may not see the damage to California’s beaches firsthand, but it is important for us to understand the consequences of pollution. “It's definitely tough to be more environmentally conscientious but what our generation needs to realize is that all the pollution that floats around eventually harms us and our children to come,” said ASB freshman president Tricia Xu. One thing people can do is recycle whatever they can. The pollution problem is largely man-made, but people can do their part to clean up their streets and their planet. “Disregarding our litter may not be a problem on the first day, nor the second, but soon enough we will pay for our mistakes. But by then it would be too late,” said Chang.

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