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    Earthquake Aftermath

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    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Earthquake Aftermath

    Post  raphaellu on Sun May 09, 2010 2:30 pm

    Earthquake Aftermath (getting that 3rd quote)

    Raphael Lu

    Houses destroyed, the fear of tsunamis swallowing cites, children being abandoned by their parents, schools forced to open half damaged and a factory bursting into flames. These incidents all have something in common: earthquakes.
    Over the months of Mar. Apr., earthquakes began to litter the planet and leaving millions of people in despair. It all started with the magnitude 7.0 earthquake in Haiti, then the 6.9 shake in Taiwan, the 6.6 quake in Japan, then a 6.4 in Chile, later a 6.9 quake in China, the 7.2 in Mexico, a 6.4 in Peru, and the recent 7.4 quake in Indonesia.
    Although some of the places like Japan and Chile were affected as much, places like Haiti and China fell into much disrepair.
    In Haiti hundreds of inhabitants are still homeless and forced to live in temporary houses. As the time progressed officials began seeing strange sites. Hundreds of children and babies were scattered across the streets with no apparent parents near by. It was later revealed that these orphans were abandoned by their parents. With the dwindling supplies and poor housings parents have been leaving their children to support groups in to make it ‘easier’ on themselves. Freshman Anna Wang is uncomfortable with it. She said that that were not justified to that “because the children would probably not be able to survive without their parents.”
    In China and Peru streets cracked open while houses in China toppled down as unfortunate bystanders were buried under feet’s of ruble. During the earthquake in Taiwan, a textile factory burst into flames leaving hundreds of people unemployed.
    In Mexico, many schools were damaged in the violent shake. With the schools year progressing, many of the schools were forced to reopen were much of the buildings are still damaged.
    Down in Indonesia, a massive tsunami watch was triggered in fear of a repeat on what happened many years ago.
    As people settle down once again many people can help to think if this relates to a recently made movie about an apocalypse soon to come. Freshman Keith Harmel, however, believes that “we should[n’t] be too concerned at the moment, but we should continue to help any countries that are having problems with earthquakes.”

    Earthquake Fever
    Non-stop Shakage

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Earthquake Aftermath

    Post  raphaellu on Sun May 16, 2010 6:05 pm

    Earthquake Aftermath

    Raphael Lu

    Houses destroyed, the fear of tsunamis swallowing cites, children being abandoned by their parents, schools forced to open half-damaged, and a factory bursting into flames. These incidents all have something in common: earthquakes.
    Over the months of March April, earthquakes began to litter the planet and leaving millions of people in despair. It all started with the infamous magnitude 7.0 earthquake in Haiti, then the 6.9 shake in Taiwan, the 6.6 quake in Japan, then a 6.4 in Chile, later a 6.9 quake in China, the 7.2 in Mexico, a 6.4 in Peru, and the recent 7.4 quake in Indonesia. Freshman Holly Yamagata said that “the earthquakes are [not] related in any way...besides the fact that they are all around the ring of fire. I think it's just a coincidence that all these earthquakes are happening at the same time.” Although some of the places like Japan and Chile weren’t affected as much, places like Haiti and China fell into much disrepair.
    In Haiti hundreds of inhabitants are still homeless and forced to live in temporary houses. As the time progressed officials began seeing strange sights. Many children and babies appeared to have been scattered across the streets with no apparent parents near by. It was later revealed that these orphans were abandoned by their parents. With the dwindling supplies and poor housings parents have been leaving their children to support groups in to make it ‘easier’ on themselves. Even with the supply of relief and help this small country is getting, many families are still in need and are resorting to drastic measures in order to survive. Freshman Anna Wang is uncomfortable with it and believes that they are not justified to do that “because the children would probably not be able to survive without their parents.”
    In China and Peru, streets cracked open while houses in China toppled down as unfortunate bystanders were buried under feet’s of ruble. When the shaking stops local residents and monks from a near by temple, pitched in the help remove the debris and tried to save any possible victims. During the earthquake in Taiwan, a textile factory burst into flames leaving hundreds of people unemployed. Part of Taiwan also experienced power outages and a few subway lines were temporally shut down.
    In Mexico, many schools were damaged in the violent shake. With the schools year progressing, many of the schools were forced to reopen were much of the buildings are still damaged.
    Down in Indonesia, a massive tsunami watch was triggered in fear of a repeat on what happened many years ago.
    Freshman Keith Harmel, however, believes that “we should[n’t] be too concerned at the moment, but we should continue to help any countries that are having problems with earthquakes.” As the earthquakes die down, countries begin to settle and rebuild; awaiting, but somewhat prepared, for another quake to strike again.

    Earthquake Fever
    Non-stop Shakeage

    nancyxiao

    Posts : 170
    Join date : 2009-08-31

    Re: Earthquake Aftermath

    Post  nancyxiao on Tue May 18, 2010 10:08 pm

    Earthquake Aftermath

    Raphael Lu

    Houses destroyed, the fear of tsunamis swallowing cites, children being abandoned by their parents, schools forced to open half-damaged, and a factory bursting into flames. These incidents all have something [one factor] in common: earthquakes.
    Over the months of March [insert "and"] April, earthquakes began to litter [littered] the planet and leaving [left] millions of people in despair. It all started with the infamous magnitude 7.0 earthquake in Haiti, then the 6.9 shake in Taiwan, the 6.6 quake in Japan, then a 6.4 in Chile, later a 6.9 quake in China, the 7.2 in Mexico, a 6.4 in Peru, and the recent 7.4 quake in Indonesia. Freshman Holly Yamagata said that “the earthquakes are [not] related in any way...besides the fact that they are all around the ring of fire. I think it's just a coincidence that all these earthquakes are happening at the same time.” Although some of the places like Japan and Chile weren’t affected as much, places like Haiti and China fell into much disrepair.
    In Haiti hundreds of inhabitants are still homeless and forced to live in temporary houses. As the time progressed officials began seeing strange sights. Many children and babies appeared to have been scattered across the streets with no apparent parents near by. It was later revealed that these orphans were abandoned by their parents. With the dwindling supplies and poor housings parents have been leaving their children to support groups in to make it ‘easier’ on themselves. Even with the supply of relief and help this small country is getting, many families are still in need and are resorting to drastic measures in order to survive. Freshman Anna Wang is uncomfortable with it and believes that they are not justified to do that “because the children would probably not be able to survive without their parents.”
    In China and Peru, streets cracked open while houses in China toppled down as unfortunate bystanders were buried under feet’s of ruble [???]. When the shaking stops [stopped,] local residents and monks from a near by temple, pitched in the help remove the debris and tried to save any possible victims. During the earthquake in Taiwan, a textile factory burst into flames leaving hundreds of people unemployed. Part of Taiwan also experienced power outages and a few subway lines were temporally shut down.
    In Mexico, many schools were damaged in the violent shake. With the schools year [school year] progressing, many of the schools were forced to reopen were much of the buildings are still damaged.
    Down in Indonesia, a massive tsunami watch was triggered in fear of a repeat on what happened many years ago.
    Freshman Keith Harmel, however, believes that “we should[n’t] [this looks really awkward] be too concerned at the moment, but we should continue to help any countries that are having problems with earthquakes.” As the earthquakes die down, countries begin to settle and rebuild; awaiting, but somewhat prepared, for another quake to strike again.

    Earthquake Fever
    Non-stop Shakeage

    raphaellu

    Posts : 62
    Join date : 2009-09-05

    Re: Earthquake Aftermath

    Post  raphaellu on Wed May 19, 2010 11:22 pm

    Earthquake Aftermath

    Raphael Lu

    Houses destroyed, the fear of tsunamis swallowing cites, children being abandoned by their parents, schools forced to open half-damaged, and a factory bursting into flames. These incidents all have one factor in common: earthquakes.
    Over the months of March and April, earthquakes littered the planet and left millions of people in despair. It all started with the infamous magnitude 7.0 earthquake in Haiti, then the 6.9 shake in Taiwan, the 6.6 quake in Japan, then a 6.4 in Chile, later a 6.9 quake in China, the 7.2 in Mexico, a 6.4 in Peru, and the recent 7.4 quake in Indonesia. Freshman Holly Yamagata said that “the earthquakes are [not] related in any way...besides the fact that they are all around the ring of fire. I think it's just a coincidence that all these earthquakes are happening at the same time.” Although some of the places like Japan and Chile weren’t affected as much, places like Haiti and China fell into much disrepair.
    In Haiti hundreds of inhabitants are still homeless and forced to live in temporary houses. As the time progressed officials began seeing strange sights. Many children and babies appeared to have been scattered across the streets with no apparent parents near by. It was later revealed that these orphans were abandoned by their parents. With the dwindling supplies and poor housings parents have been leaving their children to support groups in to make it ‘easier’ on themselves. Even with the supply of relief and help this small country is getting, many families are still in need and are resorting to drastic measures in order to survive. Freshman Anna Wang is uncomfortable with it and believes that they are not justified to do that “because the children would probably not be able to survive without their parents.”
    In China and Peru, streets cracked open while houses in China toppled down as unfortunate bystanders were buried under feets of ruble. When the shaking stopped local residents and monks from a near by temple, pitched in the help remove the debris and tried to save any possible victims. During the earthquake in Taiwan, a textile factory burst into flames leaving hundreds of people unemployed. Part of Taiwan also experienced power outages and a few subway lines were temporally shut down.
    In Mexico, many schools were damaged in the violent shake. With the schools year progressing, many of the school were forced to reopen were much of the buildings are still damaged.
    Down in Indonesia, a massive tsunami watch was triggered in fear of a repeat on what happened many years ago.
    Freshman Keith Harmel, however, believes that we shouldn’t "be too concerned at the moment, but we should continue to help any countries that are having problems with earthquakes.” As the earthquakes die down, countries begin to settle and rebuild; awaiting, but somewhat prepared, for another quake to strike again.

    Earthquake Fever
    Non-stop Shakeage

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